Merge branch 'jc/test-cleanup'
authorJunio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
Mon, 30 Sep 2019 04:19:23 +0000 (13:19 +0900)
committerJunio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com>
Mon, 30 Sep 2019 04:19:23 +0000 (13:19 +0900)
Code cleanup.

* jc/test-cleanup:
  t3005: remove unused variable
  t: use LF variable defined in the test harness

470 files changed:
.gitattributes
.gitignore
.travis.yml
Documentation/Makefile
Documentation/MyFirstContribution.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/RelNotes/2.23.0.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/RelNotes/2.24.0.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/blame-options.txt
Documentation/config.txt
Documentation/config/advice.txt
Documentation/config/blame.txt
Documentation/config/branch.txt
Documentation/config/checkout.txt
Documentation/config/color.txt
Documentation/config/core.txt
Documentation/config/diff.txt
Documentation/config/feature.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/config/fetch.txt
Documentation/config/format.txt
Documentation/config/gc.txt
Documentation/config/index.txt
Documentation/config/interactive.txt
Documentation/config/log.txt
Documentation/config/pack.txt
Documentation/config/remote.txt
Documentation/config/stash.txt
Documentation/config/status.txt
Documentation/config/tag.txt
Documentation/config/transfer.txt
Documentation/fetch-options.txt
Documentation/git-blame.txt
Documentation/git-branch.txt
Documentation/git-check-ref-format.txt
Documentation/git-checkout.txt
Documentation/git-cherry-pick.txt
Documentation/git-clean.txt
Documentation/git-clone.txt
Documentation/git-commit-graph.txt
Documentation/git-commit.txt
Documentation/git-cvsserver.txt
Documentation/git-fast-export.txt
Documentation/git-fast-import.txt
Documentation/git-fetch.txt
Documentation/git-for-each-ref.txt
Documentation/git-format-patch.txt
Documentation/git-log.txt
Documentation/git-merge-base.txt
Documentation/git-merge.txt
Documentation/git-multi-pack-index.txt
Documentation/git-pack-objects.txt
Documentation/git-pull.txt
Documentation/git-push.txt
Documentation/git-rebase.txt
Documentation/git-remote.txt
Documentation/git-repack.txt
Documentation/git-rerere.txt
Documentation/git-reset.txt
Documentation/git-restore.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/git-rev-list.txt
Documentation/git-revert.txt
Documentation/git-send-email.txt
Documentation/git-stash.txt
Documentation/git-switch.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/git-tag.txt
Documentation/git-update-server-info.txt
Documentation/git.txt
Documentation/gitattributes.txt
Documentation/gitcli.txt
Documentation/gitcore-tutorial.txt
Documentation/giteveryday.txt
Documentation/githooks.txt
Documentation/gitrepository-layout.txt
Documentation/gittutorial-2.txt
Documentation/gittutorial.txt
Documentation/gitworkflows.txt
Documentation/glossary-content.txt
Documentation/merge-options.txt
Documentation/rev-list-options.txt
Documentation/revisions.txt
Documentation/sequencer.txt
Documentation/technical/api-ref-iteration.txt
Documentation/technical/api-trace2.txt
Documentation/technical/api-tree-walking.txt
Documentation/technical/commit-graph-format.txt
Documentation/technical/commit-graph.txt
Documentation/technical/hash-function-transition.txt
Documentation/technical/partial-clone.txt
Documentation/technical/protocol-v2.txt
Documentation/user-manual.txt
GIT-VERSION-GEN
Makefile
RelNotes
advice.c
advice.h
apply.c
apply.h
archive-tar.c
archive.c
blame.c
blame.h
blob.c
branch.c
branch.h
builtin.h
builtin/am.c
builtin/blame.c
builtin/branch.c
builtin/cat-file.c
builtin/checkout.c
builtin/clone.c
builtin/column.c
builtin/commit-graph.c
builtin/commit.c
builtin/describe.c
builtin/env--helper.c [new file with mode: 0644]
builtin/fast-export.c
builtin/fetch.c
builtin/fsck.c
builtin/gc.c
builtin/grep.c
builtin/hash-object.c
builtin/index-pack.c
builtin/log.c
builtin/merge-tree.c
builtin/merge.c
builtin/mktree.c
builtin/multi-pack-index.c
builtin/name-rev.c
builtin/pack-objects.c
builtin/patch-id.c
builtin/prune.c
builtin/pull.c
builtin/range-diff.c
builtin/read-tree.c
builtin/rebase.c
builtin/receive-pack.c
builtin/remote.c
builtin/repack.c
builtin/reset.c
builtin/rev-list.c
builtin/revert.c
builtin/rm.c
builtin/show-branch.c
builtin/stash.c
builtin/submodule--helper.c
builtin/tag.c
builtin/unpack-objects.c
builtin/update-index.c
builtin/upload-pack.c
builtin/verify-commit.c
builtin/worktree.c
builtin/write-tree.c
cache-tree.c
cache.h
ci/lib.sh
ci/run-build-and-tests.sh
command-list.txt
commit-graph.c
commit-graph.h
commit.c
common-main.c
compat/mingw.c
compat/mingw.h
compat/msvc.h
compat/nedmalloc/malloc.c.h
compat/obstack.h
compat/poll/poll.c
compat/vcbuild/.gitignore [new file with mode: 0644]
compat/vcbuild/README
compat/vcbuild/find_vs_env.bat [new file with mode: 0644]
compat/vcbuild/scripts/clink.pl
compat/vcbuild/vcpkg_copy_dlls.bat [new file with mode: 0644]
compat/vcbuild/vcpkg_install.bat [new file with mode: 0644]
compat/win32/git.manifest [new file with mode: 0644]
compat/win32/pthread.h
compat/winansi.c
config.c
config.mak.uname
configure.ac
connected.c
contrib/buildsystems/Generators.pm
contrib/buildsystems/Generators/Vcproj.pm
contrib/buildsystems/Generators/Vcxproj.pm [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/buildsystems/engine.pl
contrib/completion/git-completion.bash
contrib/completion/git-prompt.sh
convert.c
convert.h
credential-store.c
decorate.c
delta-islands.c
diff.c
diff.h
diffcore-rename.c
dir-iterator.c
dir-iterator.h
environment.c
fast-import.c
fetch-negotiator.c
fetch-negotiator.h
fetch-object.c [deleted file]
fetch-object.h [deleted file]
fetch-pack.c
fsck.c
gettext.c
git-add--interactive.perl
git-compat-util.h
git-gui/git-gui.sh
git-gui/lib/checkout_op.tcl
git-gui/lib/commit.tcl
git-gui/lib/diff.tcl
git-gui/lib/index.tcl
git-mergetool.sh
git-p4.py
git-rebase--am.sh [deleted file]
git-rebase--common.sh [deleted file]
git-rebase--preserve-merges.sh
git-send-email.perl
git-sh-i18n.sh
git.c
git.rc
gitk-git/gitk
gitk-git/po/zh_cn.po [new file with mode: 0644]
grep.c
hash.h
hashmap.h
help.c
http-push.c
http.c
http.h
khash.h
line-log.c
list-objects-filter-options.c
list-objects-filter-options.h
list-objects-filter.c
list-objects-filter.h
list-objects.c
ll-merge.c
ll-merge.h
match-trees.c
merge-recursive.c
midx.c
midx.h
notes.c
object-store.h
object.c
object.h
oidmap.c
oidset.c
oidset.h
pack-bitmap-write.c
pack-bitmap.c
pack-bitmap.h
pack-objects.c
pack-objects.h
packfile.c
packfile.h
parse-options-cb.c
parse-options.c
parse-options.h
patch-ids.c
patch-ids.h
path.c
path.h
po/README
po/bg.po
po/ca.po
po/de.po
po/es.po
po/fr.po
po/git.pot
po/it.po
po/ru.po
po/sv.po
po/vi.po
po/zh_CN.po
progress.c
promisor-remote.c [new file with mode: 0644]
promisor-remote.h [new file with mode: 0644]
range-diff.c
reachable.c
read-cache.c
ref-filter.c
refs.c
refs.h
refs/files-backend.c
refs/packed-backend.c
repo-settings.c [new file with mode: 0644]
repository.h
revision.c
sequencer.c
sequencer.h
server-info.c
setup.c
sha1-file.c
sha1-name.c
shallow.c
strbuf.c
strbuf.h
submodule.c
submodule.h
t/README
t/helper/test-dir-iterator.c [new file with mode: 0644]
t/helper/test-example-decorate.c
t/helper/test-hashmap.c
t/helper/test-match-trees.c
t/helper/test-oidmap.c [new file with mode: 0644]
t/helper/test-tool.c
t/helper/test-tool.h
t/lib-git-daemon.sh
t/lib-git-svn.sh
t/lib-httpd.sh
t/lib-patch-mode.sh
t/lib-rebase.sh
t/perf/p5601-clone-reference.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t0000-basic.sh
t/t0001-init.sh
t/t0007-git-var.sh
t/t0011-hashmap.sh
t/t0016-oidmap.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t0017-env-helper.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t0021-conversion.sh
t/t0027-auto-crlf.sh
t/t0040-parse-options.sh
t/t0066-dir-iterator.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t0090-cache-tree.sh
t/t0205-gettext-poison.sh
t/t0410-partial-clone.sh
t/t1007-hash-object.sh
t/t1090-sparse-checkout-scope.sh
t/t1305-config-include.sh
t/t1309-early-config.sh
t/t1410-reflog.sh
t/t1450-fsck.sh
t/t1600-index.sh
t/t1700-split-index.sh
t/t2014-checkout-switch.sh [moved from t/t2014-switch.sh with 100% similarity]
t/t2020-checkout-detach.sh
t/t2022-checkout-paths.sh
t/t2060-switch.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t2070-restore.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t2071-restore-patch.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t2203-add-intent.sh
t/t2400-worktree-add.sh
t/t3200-branch.sh
t/t3203-branch-output.sh
t/t3206-range-diff.sh
t/t3206/history.export
t/t3311-notes-merge-fanout.sh
t/t3400-rebase.sh
t/t3418-rebase-continue.sh
t/t3420-rebase-autostash.sh
t/t3422-rebase-incompatible-options.sh
t/t3427-rebase-subtree.sh
t/t3430-rebase-merges.sh
t/t3510-cherry-pick-sequence.sh
t/t3903-stash.sh
t/t4014-format-patch.sh
t/t4018-diff-funcname.sh
t/t4018/dts-labels [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/dts-node-unitless [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/dts-nodes [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/dts-nodes-comment1 [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/dts-nodes-comment2 [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/dts-reference [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/dts-root [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/matlab-class-definition [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/matlab-function [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/matlab-octave-section-1 [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/matlab-octave-section-2 [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/matlab-section [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/rust-fn [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/rust-impl [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/rust-struct [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4018/rust-trait [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4034-diff-words.sh
t/t4034/dts/expect [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4034/dts/post [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4034/dts/pre [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t4067-diff-partial-clone.sh
t/t4150-am.sh
t/t4202-log.sh
t/t4203-mailmap.sh
t/t4211-line-log.sh
t/t5000-tar-tree.sh
t/t5000/huge-object [moved from t/t5000/19f9c8273ec45a8938e6999cb59b3ff66739902a with 100% similarity]
t/t5004-archive-corner-cases.sh
t/t5200-update-server-info.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t5307-pack-missing-commit.sh
t/t5310-pack-bitmaps.sh
t/t5318-commit-graph.sh
t/t5319-multi-pack-index.sh
t/t5324-split-commit-graph.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t5500-fetch-pack.sh
t/t5504-fetch-receive-strict.sh
t/t5510-fetch.sh
t/t5512-ls-remote.sh
t/t5514-fetch-multiple.sh
t/t5537-fetch-shallow.sh
t/t5545-push-options.sh
t/t5552-skipping-fetch-negotiator.sh
t/t5553-set-upstream.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t5601-clone.sh
t/t5604-clone-reference.sh
t/t5607-clone-bundle.sh
t/t5616-partial-clone.sh
t/t5617-clone-submodules-remote.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t5618-alternate-refs.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t5700-protocol-v1.sh
t/t5702-protocol-v2.sh
t/t5703-upload-pack-ref-in-want.sh
t/t6000-rev-list-misc.sh
t/t6011-rev-list-with-bad-commit.sh
t/t6030-bisect-porcelain.sh
t/t6040-tracking-info.sh
t/t6043-merge-rename-directories.sh
t/t6112-rev-list-filters-objects.sh
t/t6200-fmt-merge-msg.sh
t/t6300-for-each-ref.sh
t/t6302-for-each-ref-filter.sh
t/t6501-freshen-objects.sh
t/t7004-tag.sh
t/t7060-wtstatus.sh
t/t7064-wtstatus-pv2.sh
t/t7201-co.sh
t/t7405-submodule-merge.sh
t/t7502-commit-porcelain.sh
t/t7503-pre-commit-and-pre-merge-commit-hooks.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t7503-pre-commit-hook.sh [deleted file]
t/t7508-status.sh
t/t7512-status-help.sh
t/t7600-merge.sh
t/t7610-mergetool.sh
t/t7700-repack.sh
t/t7810-grep.sh
t/t7814-grep-recurse-submodules.sh
t/t8003-blame-corner-cases.sh
t/t8013-blame-ignore-revs.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t8014-blame-ignore-fuzzy.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t9001-send-email.sh
t/t9300-fast-import.sh
t/t9350-fast-export.sh
t/t9350/broken-iso-8859-7-commit-message.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t9350/simple-iso-8859-7-commit-message.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
t/t9801-git-p4-branch.sh
t/t9817-git-p4-exclude.sh
t/t9902-completion.sh
t/t9903-bash-prompt.sh
t/test-lib-functions.sh
t/test-lib.sh
tag.c
templates/hooks--pre-merge-commit.sample [new file with mode: 0755]
trace.c
transport-helper.c
transport-internal.h
transport.c
transport.h
tree-diff.c
tree-walk.c
tree-walk.h
tree.c
unpack-trees.c
upload-pack.c
url.c
url.h
userdiff.c
walker.c
wrapper.c
wt-status.c
wt-status.h

index 9fa72ad..b08a141 100644 (file)
@@ -5,6 +5,7 @@
 *.pl eof=lf diff=perl
 *.pm eol=lf diff=perl
 *.py eol=lf diff=python
+*.bat eol=crlf
 /Documentation/**/*.txt eol=lf
 /command-list.txt eol=lf
 /GIT-VERSION-GEN eol=lf
index 2374f77..fc445ed 100644 (file)
@@ -58,6 +58,7 @@
 /git-difftool
 /git-difftool--helper
 /git-describe
+/git-env--helper
 /git-fast-export
 /git-fast-import
 /git-fetch
 /git-range-diff
 /git-read-tree
 /git-rebase
-/git-rebase--am
-/git-rebase--common
-/git-rebase--interactive
 /git-rebase--preserve-merges
 /git-receive-pack
 /git-reflog
 /git-request-pull
 /git-rerere
 /git-reset
+/git-restore
 /git-rev-list
 /git-rev-parse
 /git-revert
 /git-submodule
 /git-submodule--helper
 /git-svn
+/git-switch
 /git-symbolic-ref
 /git-tag
 /git-unpack-file
 *.user
 *.idb
 *.pdb
-/Debug/
-/Release/
+*.ilk
+*.iobj
+*.ipdb
+*.dll
+.vs/
+Debug/
+Release/
+/UpgradeLog*.htm
+/git.VC.VC.opendb
+/git.VC.db
 *.dSYM
index ffb1bc4..fc5730b 100644 (file)
@@ -21,6 +21,10 @@ matrix:
       compiler:
       addons:
       before_install:
+    - env: jobname=linux-gcc-4.8
+      os: linux
+      dist: trusty
+      compiler:
     - env: jobname=Linux32
       os: linux
       compiler:
index dbf5a0f..76f2ecf 100644 (file)
@@ -76,6 +76,7 @@ SP_ARTICLES += howto/maintain-git
 API_DOCS = $(patsubst %.txt,%,$(filter-out technical/api-index-skel.txt technical/api-index.txt, $(wildcard technical/api-*.txt)))
 SP_ARTICLES += $(API_DOCS)
 
+TECH_DOCS += MyFirstContribution
 TECH_DOCS += SubmittingPatches
 TECH_DOCS += technical/hash-function-transition
 TECH_DOCS += technical/http-protocol
diff --git a/Documentation/MyFirstContribution.txt b/Documentation/MyFirstContribution.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..f867037
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,1134 @@
+My First Contribution to the Git Project
+========================================
+:sectanchors:
+
+[[summary]]
+== Summary
+
+This is a tutorial demonstrating the end-to-end workflow of creating a change to
+the Git tree, sending it for review, and making changes based on comments.
+
+[[prerequisites]]
+=== Prerequisites
+
+This tutorial assumes you're already fairly familiar with using Git to manage
+source code.  The Git workflow steps will largely remain unexplained.
+
+[[related-reading]]
+=== Related Reading
+
+This tutorial aims to summarize the following documents, but the reader may find
+useful additional context:
+
+- `Documentation/SubmittingPatches`
+- `Documentation/howto/new-command.txt`
+
+[[getting-started]]
+== Getting Started
+
+[[cloning]]
+=== Clone the Git Repository
+
+Git is mirrored in a number of locations. Clone the repository from one of them;
+https://git-scm.com/downloads suggests one of the best places to clone from is
+the mirror on GitHub.
+
+----
+$ git clone https://github.com/git/git git
+$ cd git
+----
+
+[[identify-problem]]
+=== Identify Problem to Solve
+
+////
+Use + to indicate fixed-width here; couldn't get ` to work nicely with the
+quotes around "Pony Saying 'Um, Hello'".
+////
+In this tutorial, we will add a new command, +git psuh+, short for ``Pony Saying
+`Um, Hello''' - a feature which has gone unimplemented despite a high frequency
+of invocation during users' typical daily workflow.
+
+(We've seen some other effort in this space with the implementation of popular
+commands such as `sl`.)
+
+[[setup-workspace]]
+=== Set Up Your Workspace
+
+Let's start by making a development branch to work on our changes. Per
+`Documentation/SubmittingPatches`, since a brand new command is a new feature,
+it's fine to base your work on `master`. However, in the future for bugfixes,
+etc., you should check that document and base it on the appropriate branch.
+
+For the purposes of this document, we will base all our work on the `master`
+branch of the upstream project. Create the `psuh` branch you will use for
+development like so:
+
+----
+$ git checkout -b psuh origin/master
+----
+
+We'll make a number of commits here in order to demonstrate how to send a topic
+with multiple patches up for review simultaneously.
+
+[[code-it-up]]
+== Code It Up!
+
+NOTE: A reference implementation can be found at
+https://github.com/nasamuffin/git/tree/psuh.
+
+[[add-new-command]]
+=== Adding a New Command
+
+Lots of the subcommands are written as builtins, which means they are
+implemented in C and compiled into the main `git` executable. Implementing the
+very simple `psuh` command as a built-in will demonstrate the structure of the
+codebase, the internal API, and the process of working together as a contributor
+with the reviewers and maintainer to integrate this change into the system.
+
+Built-in subcommands are typically implemented in a function named "cmd_"
+followed by the name of the subcommand, in a source file named after the
+subcommand and contained within `builtin/`. So it makes sense to implement your
+command in `builtin/psuh.c`. Create that file, and within it, write the entry
+point for your command in a function matching the style and signature:
+
+----
+int cmd_psuh(int argc, const char **argv, const char *prefix)
+----
+
+We'll also need to add the declaration of psuh; open up `builtin.h`, find the
+declaration for `cmd_push`, and add a new line for `psuh` immediately before it,
+in order to keep the declarations sorted:
+
+----
+int cmd_psuh(int argc, const char **argv, const char *prefix);
+----
+
+Be sure to `#include "builtin.h"` in your `psuh.c`.
+
+Go ahead and add some throwaway printf to that function. This is a decent
+starting point as we can now add build rules and register the command.
+
+NOTE: Your throwaway text, as well as much of the text you will be adding over
+the course of this tutorial, is user-facing. That means it needs to be
+localizable. Take a look at `po/README` under "Marking strings for translation".
+Throughout the tutorial, we will mark strings for translation as necessary; you
+should also do so when writing your user-facing commands in the future.
+
+----
+int cmd_psuh(int argc, const char **argv, const char *prefix)
+{
+       printf(_("Pony saying hello goes here.\n"));
+       return 0;
+}
+----
+
+Let's try to build it.  Open `Makefile`, find where `builtin/push.o` is added
+to `BUILTIN_OBJS`, and add `builtin/psuh.o` in the same way next to it in
+alphabetical order. Once you've done so, move to the top-level directory and
+build simply with `make`. Also add the `DEVELOPER=1` variable to turn on
+some additional warnings:
+
+----
+$ echo DEVELOPER=1 >config.mak
+$ make
+----
+
+NOTE: When you are developing the Git project, it's preferred that you use the
+`DEVELOPER` flag; if there's some reason it doesn't work for you, you can turn
+it off, but it's a good idea to mention the problem to the mailing list.
+
+NOTE: The Git build is parallelizable. `-j#` is not included above but you can
+use it as you prefer, here and elsewhere.
+
+Great, now your new command builds happily on its own. But nobody invokes it.
+Let's change that.
+
+The list of commands lives in `git.c`. We can register a new command by adding
+a `cmd_struct` to the `commands[]` array. `struct cmd_struct` takes a string
+with the command name, a function pointer to the command implementation, and a
+setup option flag. For now, let's keep mimicking `push`. Find the line where
+`cmd_push` is registered, copy it, and modify it for `cmd_psuh`, placing the new
+line in alphabetical order.
+
+The options are documented in `builtin.h` under "Adding a new built-in." Since
+we hope to print some data about the user's current workspace context later,
+we need a Git directory, so choose `RUN_SETUP` as your only option.
+
+Go ahead and build again. You should see a clean build, so let's kick the tires
+and see if it works. There's a binary you can use to test with in the
+`bin-wrappers` directory.
+
+----
+$ ./bin-wrappers/git psuh
+----
+
+Check it out! You've got a command! Nice work! Let's commit this.
+
+`git status` reveals modified `Makefile`, `builtin.h`, and `git.c` as well as
+untracked `builtin/psuh.c` and `git-psuh`. First, let's take care of the binary,
+which should be ignored. Open `.gitignore` in your editor, find `/git-push`, and
+add an entry for your new command in alphabetical order:
+
+----
+...
+/git-prune-packed
+/git-psuh
+/git-pull
+/git-push
+/git-quiltimport
+/git-range-diff
+...
+----
+
+Checking `git status` again should show that `git-psuh` has been removed from
+the untracked list and `.gitignore` has been added to the modified list. Now we
+can stage and commit:
+
+----
+$ git add Makefile builtin.h builtin/psuh.c git.c .gitignore
+$ git commit -s
+----
+
+You will be presented with your editor in order to write a commit message. Start
+the commit with a 50-column or less subject line, including the name of the
+component you're working on, followed by a blank line (always required) and then
+the body of your commit message, which should provide the bulk of the context.
+Remember to be explicit and provide the "Why" of your change, especially if it
+couldn't easily be understood from your diff. When editing your commit message,
+don't remove the Signed-off-by line which was added by `-s` above.
+
+----
+psuh: add a built-in by popular demand
+
+Internal metrics indicate this is a command many users expect to be
+present. So here's an implementation to help drive customer
+satisfaction and engagement: a pony which doubtfully greets the user,
+or, a Pony Saying "Um, Hello" (PSUH).
+
+This commit message is intentionally formatted to 72 columns per line,
+starts with a single line as "commit message subject" that is written as
+if to command the codebase to do something (add this, teach a command
+that). The body of the message is designed to add information about the
+commit that is not readily deduced from reading the associated diff,
+such as answering the question "why?".
+
+Signed-off-by: A U Thor <author@example.com>
+----
+
+Go ahead and inspect your new commit with `git show`. "psuh:" indicates you
+have modified mainly the `psuh` command. The subject line gives readers an idea
+of what you've changed. The sign-off line (`-s`) indicates that you agree to
+the Developer's Certificate of Origin 1.1 (see the
+`Documentation/SubmittingPatches` +++[[dco]]+++ header).
+
+For the remainder of the tutorial, the subject line only will be listed for the
+sake of brevity. However, fully-fleshed example commit messages are available
+on the reference implementation linked at the top of this document.
+
+[[implementation]]
+=== Implementation
+
+It's probably useful to do at least something besides printing out a string.
+Let's start by having a look at everything we get.
+
+Modify your `cmd_psuh` implementation to dump the args you're passed, keeping
+existing `printf()` calls in place:
+
+----
+       int i;
+
+       ...
+
+       printf(Q_("Your args (there is %d):\n",
+                 "Your args (there are %d):\n",
+                 argc),
+              argc);
+       for (i = 0; i < argc; i++)
+               printf("%d: %s\n", i, argv[i]);
+
+       printf(_("Your current working directory:\n<top-level>%s%s\n"),
+              prefix ? "/" : "", prefix ? prefix : "");
+
+----
+
+Build and try it. As you may expect, there's pretty much just whatever we give
+on the command line, including the name of our command. (If `prefix` is empty
+for you, try `cd Documentation/ && ../bin-wrappers/git psuh`). That's not so
+helpful. So what other context can we get?
+
+Add a line to `#include "config.h"`. Then, add the following bits to the
+function body:
+
+----
+       const char *cfg_name;
+
+...
+
+       git_config(git_default_config, NULL);
+       if (git_config_get_string_const("user.name", &cfg_name) > 0)
+               printf(_("No name is found in config\n"));
+       else
+               printf(_("Your name: %s\n"), cfg_name);
+----
+
+`git_config()` will grab the configuration from config files known to Git and
+apply standard precedence rules. `git_config_get_string_const()` will look up
+a specific key ("user.name") and give you the value. There are a number of
+single-key lookup functions like this one; you can see them all (and more info
+about how to use `git_config()`) in `Documentation/technical/api-config.txt`.
+
+You should see that the name printed matches the one you see when you run:
+
+----
+$ git config --get user.name
+----
+
+Great! Now we know how to check for values in the Git config. Let's commit this
+too, so we don't lose our progress.
+
+----
+$ git add builtin/psuh.c
+$ git commit -sm "psuh: show parameters & config opts"
+----
+
+NOTE: Again, the above is for sake of brevity in this tutorial. In a real change
+you should not use `-m` but instead use the editor to write a meaningful
+message.
+
+Still, it'd be nice to know what the user's working context is like. Let's see
+if we can print the name of the user's current branch. We can mimic the
+`git status` implementation; the printer is located in `wt-status.c` and we can
+see that the branch is held in a `struct wt_status`.
+
+`wt_status_print()` gets invoked by `cmd_status()` in `builtin/commit.c`.
+Looking at that implementation we see the status config being populated like so:
+
+----
+status_init_config(&s, git_status_config);
+----
+
+But as we drill down, we can find that `status_init_config()` wraps a call
+to `git_config()`. Let's modify the code we wrote in the previous commit.
+
+Be sure to include the header to allow you to use `struct wt_status`:
+----
+#include "wt-status.h"
+----
+
+Then modify your `cmd_psuh` implementation to declare your `struct wt_status`,
+prepare it, and print its contents:
+
+----
+       struct wt_status status;
+
+...
+
+       wt_status_prepare(the_repository, &status);
+       git_config(git_default_config, &status);
+
+...
+
+       printf(_("Your current branch: %s\n"), status.branch);
+----
+
+Run it again. Check it out - here's the (verbose) name of your current branch!
+
+Let's commit this as well.
+
+----
+$ git add builtin/psuh.c
+$ git commit -sm "psuh: print the current branch"
+----
+
+Now let's see if we can get some info about a specific commit.
+
+Luckily, there are some helpers for us here. `commit.h` has a function called
+`lookup_commit_reference_by_name` to which we can simply provide a hardcoded
+string; `pretty.h` has an extremely handy `pp_commit_easy()` call which doesn't
+require a full format object to be passed.
+
+Add the following includes:
+
+----
+#include "commit.h"
+#include "pretty.h"
+----
+
+Then, add the following lines within your implementation of `cmd_psuh()` near
+the declarations and the logic, respectively.
+
+----
+       struct commit *c = NULL;
+       struct strbuf commitline = STRBUF_INIT;
+
+...
+
+       c = lookup_commit_reference_by_name("origin/master");
+
+       if (c != NULL) {
+               pp_commit_easy(CMIT_FMT_ONELINE, c, &commitline);
+               printf(_("Current commit: %s\n"), commitline.buf);
+       }
+----
+
+The `struct strbuf` provides some safety belts to your basic `char*`, one of
+which is a length member to prevent buffer overruns. It needs to be initialized
+nicely with `STRBUF_INIT`. Keep it in mind when you need to pass around `char*`.
+
+`lookup_commit_reference_by_name` resolves the name you pass it, so you can play
+with the value there and see what kind of things you can come up with.
+
+`pp_commit_easy` is a convenience wrapper in `pretty.h` that takes a single
+format enum shorthand, rather than an entire format struct. It then
+pretty-prints the commit according to that shorthand. These are similar to the
+formats available with `--pretty=FOO` in many Git commands.
+
+Build it and run, and if you're using the same name in the example, you should
+see the subject line of the most recent commit in `origin/master` that you know
+about. Neat! Let's commit that as well.
+
+----
+$ git add builtin/psuh.c
+$ git commit -sm "psuh: display the top of origin/master"
+----
+
+[[add-documentation]]
+=== Adding Documentation
+
+Awesome! You've got a fantastic new command that you're ready to share with the
+community. But hang on just a minute - this isn't very user-friendly. Run the
+following:
+
+----
+$ ./bin-wrappers/git help psuh
+----
+
+Your new command is undocumented! Let's fix that.
+
+Take a look at `Documentation/git-*.txt`. These are the manpages for the
+subcommands that Git knows about. You can open these up and take a look to get
+acquainted with the format, but then go ahead and make a new file
+`Documentation/git-psuh.txt`. Like with most of the documentation in the Git
+project, help pages are written with AsciiDoc (see CodingGuidelines, "Writing
+Documentation" section). Use the following template to fill out your own
+manpage:
+
+// Surprisingly difficult to embed AsciiDoc source within AsciiDoc.
+[listing]
+....
+git-psuh(1)
+===========
+
+NAME
+----
+git-psuh - Delight users' typo with a shy horse
+
+
+SYNOPSIS
+--------
+[verse]
+'git-psuh [<arg>...]'
+
+DESCRIPTION
+-----------
+...
+
+OPTIONS[[OPTIONS]]
+------------------
+...
+
+OUTPUT
+------
+...
+
+GIT
+---
+Part of the linkgit:git[1] suite
+....
+
+The most important pieces of this to note are the file header, underlined by =,
+the NAME section, and the SYNOPSIS, which would normally contain the grammar if
+your command took arguments. Try to use well-established manpage headers so your
+documentation is consistent with other Git and UNIX manpages; this makes life
+easier for your user, who can skip to the section they know contains the
+information they need.
+
+Now that you've written your manpage, you'll need to build it explicitly. We
+convert your AsciiDoc to troff which is man-readable like so:
+
+----
+$ make all doc
+$ man Documentation/git-psuh.1
+----
+
+or
+
+----
+$ make -C Documentation/ git-psuh.1
+$ man Documentation/git-psuh.1
+----
+
+NOTE: You may need to install the package `asciidoc` to get this to work.
+
+While this isn't as satisfying as running through `git help`, you can at least
+check that your help page looks right.
+
+You can also check that the documentation coverage is good (that is, the project
+sees that your command has been implemented as well as documented) by running
+`make check-docs` from the top-level.
+
+Go ahead and commit your new documentation change.
+
+[[add-usage]]
+=== Adding Usage Text
+
+Try and run `./bin-wrappers/git psuh -h`. Your command should crash at the end.
+That's because `-h` is a special case which your command should handle by
+printing usage.
+
+Take a look at `Documentation/technical/api-parse-options.txt`. This is a handy
+tool for pulling out options you need to be able to handle, and it takes a
+usage string.
+
+In order to use it, we'll need to prepare a NULL-terminated array of usage
+strings and a `builtin_psuh_options` array.
+
+Add a line to `#include "parse-options.h"`.
+
+At global scope, add your array of usage strings:
+
+----
+static const char * const psuh_usage[] = {
+       N_("git psuh [<arg>...]"),
+       NULL,
+};
+----
+
+Then, within your `cmd_psuh()` implementation, we can declare and populate our
+`option` struct. Ours is pretty boring but you can add more to it if you want to
+explore `parse_options()` in more detail:
+
+----
+       struct option options[] = {
+               OPT_END()
+       };
+----
+
+Finally, before you print your args and prefix, add the call to
+`parse-options()`:
+
+----
+       argc = parse_options(argc, argv, prefix, options, psuh_usage, 0);
+----
+
+This call will modify your `argv` parameter. It will strip the options you
+specified in `options` from `argv` and the locations pointed to from `options`
+entries will be updated. Be sure to replace your `argc` with the result from
+`parse_options()`, or you will be confused if you try to parse `argv` later.
+
+It's worth noting the special argument `--`. As you may be aware, many Unix
+commands use `--` to indicate "end of named parameters" - all parameters after
+the `--` are interpreted merely as positional arguments. (This can be handy if
+you want to pass as a parameter something which would usually be interpreted as
+a flag.) `parse_options()` will terminate parsing when it reaches `--` and give
+you the rest of the options afterwards, untouched.
+
+Build again. Now, when you run with `-h`, you should see your usage printed and
+your command terminated before anything else interesting happens. Great!
+
+Go ahead and commit this one, too.
+
+[[testing]]
+== Testing
+
+It's important to test your code - even for a little toy command like this one.
+Moreover, your patch won't be accepted into the Git tree without tests. Your
+tests should:
+
+* Illustrate the current behavior of the feature
+* Prove the current behavior matches the expected behavior
+* Ensure the externally-visible behavior isn't broken in later changes
+
+So let's write some tests.
+
+Related reading: `t/README`
+
+[[overview-test-structure]]
+=== Overview of Testing Structure
+
+The tests in Git live in `t/` and are named with a 4-digit decimal number using
+the schema shown in the Naming Tests section of `t/README`.
+
+[[write-new-test]]
+=== Writing Your Test
+
+Since this a toy command, let's go ahead and name the test with t9999. However,
+as many of the family/subcmd combinations are full, best practice seems to be
+to find a command close enough to the one you've added and share its naming
+space.
+
+Create a new file `t/t9999-psuh-tutorial.sh`. Begin with the header as so (see
+"Writing Tests" and "Source 'test-lib.sh'" in `t/README`):
+
+----
+#!/bin/sh
+
+test_description='git-psuh test
+
+This test runs git-psuh and makes sure it does not crash.'
+
+. ./test-lib.sh
+----
+
+Tests are framed inside of a `test_expect_success` in order to output TAP
+formatted results. Let's make sure that `git psuh` doesn't exit poorly and does
+mention the right animal somewhere:
+
+----
+test_expect_success 'runs correctly with no args and good output' '
+       git psuh >actual &&
+       test_i18ngrep Pony actual
+'
+----
+
+Indicate that you've run everything you wanted by adding the following at the
+bottom of your script:
+
+----
+test_done
+----
+
+Make sure you mark your test script executable:
+
+----
+$ chmod +x t/t9999-psuh-tutorial.sh
+----
+
+You can get an idea of whether you created your new test script successfully
+by running `make -C t test-lint`, which will check for things like test number
+uniqueness, executable bit, and so on.
+
+[[local-test]]
+=== Running Locally
+
+Let's try and run locally:
+
+----
+$ make
+$ cd t/ && prove t9999-psuh-tutorial.sh
+----
+
+You can run the full test suite and ensure `git-psuh` didn't break anything:
+
+----
+$ cd t/
+$ prove -j$(nproc) --shuffle t[0-9]*.sh
+----
+
+NOTE: You can also do this with `make test` or use any testing harness which can
+speak TAP. `prove` can run concurrently. `shuffle` randomizes the order the
+tests are run in, which makes them resilient against unwanted inter-test
+dependencies. `prove` also makes the output nicer.
+
+Go ahead and commit this change, as well.
+
+[[ready-to-share]]
+== Getting Ready to Share
+
+You may have noticed already that the Git project performs its code reviews via
+emailed patches, which are then applied by the maintainer when they are ready
+and approved by the community. The Git project does not accept patches from
+pull requests, and the patches emailed for review need to be formatted a
+specific way. At this point the tutorial diverges, in order to demonstrate two
+different methods of formatting your patchset and getting it reviewed.
+
+The first method to be covered is GitGitGadget, which is useful for those
+already familiar with GitHub's common pull request workflow. This method
+requires a GitHub account.
+
+The second method to be covered is `git send-email`, which can give slightly
+more fine-grained control over the emails to be sent. This method requires some
+setup which can change depending on your system and will not be covered in this
+tutorial.
+
+Regardless of which method you choose, your engagement with reviewers will be
+the same; the review process will be covered after the sections on GitGitGadget
+and `git send-email`.
+
+[[howto-ggg]]
+== Sending Patches via GitGitGadget
+
+One option for sending patches is to follow a typical pull request workflow and
+send your patches out via GitGitGadget. GitGitGadget is a tool created by
+Johannes Schindelin to make life as a Git contributor easier for those used to
+the GitHub PR workflow. It allows contributors to open pull requests against its
+mirror of the Git project, and does some magic to turn the PR into a set of
+emails and send them out for you. It also runs the Git continuous integration
+suite for you. It's documented at http://gitgitgadget.github.io.
+
+[[create-fork]]
+=== Forking `git/git` on GitHub
+
+Before you can send your patch off to be reviewed using GitGitGadget, you will
+need to fork the Git project and upload your changes. First thing - make sure
+you have a GitHub account.
+
+Head to the https://github.com/git/git[GitHub mirror] and look for the Fork
+button. Place your fork wherever you deem appropriate and create it.
+
+[[upload-to-fork]]
+=== Uploading to Your Own Fork
+
+To upload your branch to your own fork, you'll need to add the new fork as a
+remote. You can use `git remote -v` to show the remotes you have added already.
+From your new fork's page on GitHub, you can press "Clone or download" to get
+the URL; then you need to run the following to add, replacing your own URL and
+remote name for the examples provided:
+
+----
+$ git remote add remotename git@github.com:remotename/git.git
+----
+
+or to use the HTTPS URL:
+
+----
+$ git remote add remotename https://github.com/remotename/git/.git
+----
+
+Run `git remote -v` again and you should see the new remote showing up.
+`git fetch remotename` (with the real name of your remote replaced) in order to
+get ready to push.
+
+Next, double-check that you've been doing all your development in a new branch
+by running `git branch`. If you didn't, now is a good time to move your new
+commits to their own branch.
+
+As mentioned briefly at the beginning of this document, we are basing our work
+on `master`, so go ahead and update as shown below, or using your preferred
+workflow.
+
+----
+$ git checkout master
+$ git pull -r
+$ git rebase master psuh
+----
+
+Finally, you're ready to push your new topic branch! (Due to our branch and
+command name choices, be careful when you type the command below.)
+
+----
+$ git push remotename psuh
+----
+
+Now you should be able to go and check out your newly created branch on GitHub.
+
+[[send-pr-ggg]]
+=== Sending a PR to GitGitGadget
+
+In order to have your code tested and formatted for review, you need to start by
+opening a Pull Request against `gitgitgadget/git`. Head to
+https://github.com/gitgitgadget/git and open a PR either with the "New pull
+request" button or the convenient "Compare & pull request" button that may
+appear with the name of your newly pushed branch.
+
+Review the PR's title and description, as it's used by GitGitGadget as the cover
+letter for your change. When you're happy, submit your pull request.
+
+[[run-ci-ggg]]
+=== Running CI and Getting Ready to Send
+
+If it's your first time using GitGitGadget (which is likely, as you're using
+this tutorial) then someone will need to give you permission to use the tool.
+As mentioned in the GitGitGadget documentation, you just need someone who
+already uses it to comment on your PR with `/allow <username>`. GitGitGadget
+will automatically run your PRs through the CI even without the permission given
+but you will not be able to `/submit` your changes until someone allows you to
+use the tool.
+
+If the CI fails, you can update your changes with `git rebase -i` and push your
+branch again:
+
+----
+$ git push -f remotename psuh
+----
+
+In fact, you should continue to make changes this way up until the point when
+your patch is accepted into `next`.
+
+////
+TODO https://github.com/gitgitgadget/gitgitgadget/issues/83
+It'd be nice to be able to verify that the patch looks good before sending it
+to everyone on Git mailing list.
+[[check-work-ggg]]
+=== Check Your Work
+////
+
+[[send-mail-ggg]]
+=== Sending Your Patches
+
+Now that your CI is passing and someone has granted you permission to use
+GitGitGadget with the `/allow` command, sending out for review is as simple as
+commenting on your PR with `/submit`.
+
+[[responding-ggg]]
+=== Updating With Comments
+
+Skip ahead to <<reviewing,Responding to Reviews>> for information on how to
+reply to review comments you will receive on the mailing list.
+
+Once you have your branch again in the shape you want following all review
+comments, you can submit again:
+
+----
+$ git push -f remotename psuh
+----
+
+Next, go look at your pull request against GitGitGadget; you should see the CI
+has been kicked off again. Now while the CI is running is a good time for you
+to modify your description at the top of the pull request thread; it will be
+used again as the cover letter. You should use this space to describe what
+has changed since your previous version, so that your reviewers have some idea
+of what they're looking at. When the CI is done running, you can comment once
+more with `/submit` - GitGitGadget will automatically add a v2 mark to your
+changes.
+
+[[howto-git-send-email]]
+== Sending Patches with `git send-email`
+
+If you don't want to use GitGitGadget, you can also use Git itself to mail your
+patches. Some benefits of using Git this way include finer grained control of
+subject line (for example, being able to use the tag [RFC PATCH] in the subject)
+and being able to send a ``dry run'' mail to yourself to ensure it all looks
+good before going out to the list.
+
+[[setup-git-send-email]]
+=== Prerequisite: Setting Up `git send-email`
+
+Configuration for `send-email` can vary based on your operating system and email
+provider, and so will not be covered in this tutorial, beyond stating that in
+many distributions of Linux, `git-send-email` is not packaged alongside the
+typical `git` install. You may need to install this additional package; there
+are a number of resources online to help you do so. You will also need to
+determine the right way to configure it to use your SMTP server; again, as this
+configuration can change significantly based on your system and email setup, it
+is out of scope for the context of this tutorial.
+
+[[format-patch]]
+=== Preparing Initial Patchset
+
+Sending emails with Git is a two-part process; before you can prepare the emails
+themselves, you'll need to prepare the patches. Luckily, this is pretty simple:
+
+----
+$ git format-patch --cover-letter -o psuh/ master..psuh
+----
+
+The `--cover-letter` parameter tells `format-patch` to create a cover letter
+template for you. You will need to fill in the template before you're ready
+to send - but for now, the template will be next to your other patches.
+
+The `-o psuh/` parameter tells `format-patch` to place the patch files into a
+directory. This is useful because `git send-email` can take a directory and
+send out all the patches from there.
+
+`master..psuh` tells `format-patch` to generate patches for the difference
+between `master` and `psuh`. It will make one patch file per commit. After you
+run, you can go have a look at each of the patches with your favorite text
+editor and make sure everything looks alright; however, it's not recommended to
+make code fixups via the patch file. It's a better idea to make the change the
+normal way using `git rebase -i` or by adding a new commit than by modifying a
+patch.
+
+NOTE: Optionally, you can also use the `--rfc` flag to prefix your patch subject
+with ``[RFC PATCH]'' instead of ``[PATCH]''. RFC stands for ``request for
+comments'' and indicates that while your code isn't quite ready for submission,
+you'd like to begin the code review process. This can also be used when your
+patch is a proposal, but you aren't sure whether the community wants to solve
+the problem with that approach or not - to conduct a sort of design review. You
+may also see on the list patches marked ``WIP'' - this means they are incomplete
+but want reviewers to look at what they have so far. You can add this flag with
+`--subject-prefix=WIP`.
+
+Check and make sure that your patches and cover letter template exist in the
+directory you specified - you're nearly ready to send out your review!
+
+[[cover-letter]]
+=== Preparing Email
+
+In addition to an email per patch, the Git community also expects your patches
+to come with a cover letter, typically with a subject line [PATCH 0/x] (where
+x is the number of patches you're sending). Since you invoked `format-patch`
+with `--cover-letter`, you've already got a template ready. Open it up in your
+favorite editor.
+
+You should see a number of headers present already. Check that your `From:`
+header is correct. Then modify your `Subject:` to something which succinctly
+covers the purpose of your entire topic branch, for example:
+
+----
+Subject: [PATCH 0/7] adding the 'psuh' command
+----
+
+Make sure you retain the ``[PATCH 0/X]'' part; that's what indicates to the Git
+community that this email is the beginning of a review, and many reviewers
+filter their email for this type of flag.
+
+You'll need to add some extra parameters when you invoke `git send-email` to add
+the cover letter.
+
+Next you'll have to fill out the body of your cover letter. This is an important
+component of change submission as it explains to the community from a high level
+what you're trying to do, and why, in a way that's more apparent than just
+looking at your diff. Be sure to explain anything your diff doesn't make clear
+on its own.
+
+Here's an example body for `psuh`:
+
+----
+Our internal metrics indicate widespread interest in the command
+git-psuh - that is, many users are trying to use it, but finding it is
+unavailable, using some unknown workaround instead.
+
+The following handful of patches add the psuh command and implement some
+handy features on top of it.
+
+This patchset is part of the MyFirstContribution tutorial and should not
+be merged.
+----
+
+The template created by `git format-patch --cover-letter` includes a diffstat.
+This gives reviewers a summary of what they're in for when reviewing your topic.
+The one generated for `psuh` from the sample implementation looks like this:
+
+----
+ Documentation/git-psuh.txt | 40 +++++++++++++++++++++
+ Makefile                   |  1 +
+ builtin.h                  |  1 +
+ builtin/psuh.c             | 73 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+ git.c                      |  1 +
+ t/t9999-psuh-tutorial.sh   | 12 +++++++
+ 6 files changed, 128 insertions(+)
+ create mode 100644 Documentation/git-psuh.txt
+ create mode 100644 builtin/psuh.c
+ create mode 100755 t/t9999-psuh-tutorial.sh
+----
+
+Finally, the letter will include the version of Git used to generate the
+patches. You can leave that string alone.
+
+[[sending-git-send-email]]
+=== Sending Email
+
+At this point you should have a directory `psuh/` which is filled with your
+patches and a cover letter. Time to mail it out! You can send it like this:
+
+----
+$ git send-email --to=target@example.com psuh/*.patch
+----
+
+NOTE: Check `git help send-email` for some other options which you may find
+valuable, such as changing the Reply-to address or adding more CC and BCC lines.
+
+NOTE: When you are sending a real patch, it will go to git@vger.kernel.org - but
+please don't send your patchset from the tutorial to the real mailing list! For
+now, you can send it to yourself, to make sure you understand how it will look.
+
+After you run the command above, you will be presented with an interactive
+prompt for each patch that's about to go out. This gives you one last chance to
+edit or quit sending something (but again, don't edit code this way). Once you
+press `y` or `a` at these prompts your emails will be sent! Congratulations!
+
+Awesome, now the community will drop everything and review your changes. (Just
+kidding - be patient!)
+
+[[v2-git-send-email]]
+=== Sending v2
+
+Skip ahead to <<reviewing,Responding to Reviews>> for information on how to
+handle comments from reviewers. Continue this section when your topic branch is
+shaped the way you want it to look for your patchset v2.
+
+When you're ready with the next iteration of your patch, the process is fairly
+similar.
+
+First, generate your v2 patches again:
+
+----
+$ git format-patch -v2 --cover-letter -o psuh/ master..psuh
+----
+
+This will add your v2 patches, all named like `v2-000n-my-commit-subject.patch`,
+to the `psuh/` directory. You may notice that they are sitting alongside the v1
+patches; that's fine, but be careful when you are ready to send them.
+
+Edit your cover letter again. Now is a good time to mention what's different
+between your last version and now, if it's something significant. You do not
+need the exact same body in your second cover letter; focus on explaining to
+reviewers the changes you've made that may not be as visible.
+
+You will also need to go and find the Message-Id of your previous cover letter.
+You can either note it when you send the first series, from the output of `git
+send-email`, or you can look it up on the
+https://public-inbox.org/git[mailing list]. Find your cover letter in the
+archives, click on it, then click "permalink" or "raw" to reveal the Message-Id
+header. It should match:
+
+----
+Message-Id: <foo.12345.author@example.com>
+----
+
+Your Message-Id is `<foo.12345.author@example.com>`. This example will be used
+below as well; make sure to replace it with the correct Message-Id for your
+**previous cover letter** - that is, if you're sending v2, use the Message-Id
+from v1; if you're sending v3, use the Message-Id from v2.
+
+While you're looking at the email, you should also note who is CC'd, as it's
+common practice in the mailing list to keep all CCs on a thread. You can add
+these CC lines directly to your cover letter with a line like so in the header
+(before the Subject line):
+
+----
+CC: author@example.com, Othe R <other@example.com>
+----
+
+Now send the emails again, paying close attention to which messages you pass in
+to the command:
+
+----
+$ git send-email --to=target@example.com
+                --in-reply-to="<foo.12345.author@example.com>"
+                psuh/v2*
+----
+
+[[single-patch]]
+=== Bonus Chapter: One-Patch Changes
+
+In some cases, your very small change may consist of only one patch. When that
+happens, you only need to send one email. Your commit message should already be
+meaningful and explain at a high level the purpose (what is happening and why)
+of your patch, but if you need to supply even more context, you can do so below
+the `---` in your patch. Take the example below, which was generated with `git
+format-patch` on a single commit, and then edited to add the content between
+the `---` and the diffstat.
+
+----
+From 1345bbb3f7ac74abde040c12e737204689a72723 Mon Sep 17 00:00:00 2001
+From: A U Thor <author@example.com>
+Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2019 15:11:02 -0700
+Subject: [PATCH] README: change the grammar
+
+I think it looks better this way. This part of the commit message will
+end up in the commit-log.
+
+Signed-off-by: A U Thor <author@example.com>
+---
+Let's have a wild discussion about grammar on the mailing list. This
+part of my email will never end up in the commit log. Here is where I
+can add additional context to the mailing list about my intent, outside
+of the context of the commit log. This section was added after `git
+format-patch` was run, by editing the patch file in a text editor.
+
+ README.md | 2 +-
+ 1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 1 deletion(-)
+
+diff --git a/README.md b/README.md
+index 88f126184c..38da593a60 100644
+--- a/README.md
++++ b/README.md
+@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
+ Git - fast, scalable, distributed revision control system
+ =========================================================
+
+-Git is a fast, scalable, distributed revision control system with an
++Git is a fast, scalable, and distributed revision control system with an
+ unusually rich command set that provides both high-level operations
+ and full access to internals.
+
+--
+2.21.0.392.gf8f6787159e-goog
+----
+
+[[now-what]]
+== My Patch Got Emailed - Now What?
+
+[[reviewing]]
+=== Responding to Reviews
+
+After a few days, you will hopefully receive a reply to your patchset with some
+comments. Woohoo! Now you can get back to work.
+
+It's good manners to reply to each comment, notifying the reviewer that you have
+made the change requested, feel the original is better, or that the comment
+inspired you to do something a new way which is superior to both the original
+and the suggested change. This way reviewers don't need to inspect your v2 to
+figure out whether you implemented their comment or not.
+
+If you are going to push back on a comment, be polite and explain why you feel
+your original is better; be prepared that the reviewer may still disagree with
+you, and the rest of the community may weigh in on one side or the other. As
+with all code reviews, it's important to keep an open mind to doing something a
+different way than you originally planned; other reviewers have a different
+perspective on the project than you do, and may be thinking of a valid side
+effect which had not occurred to you. It is always okay to ask for clarification
+if you aren't sure why a change was suggested, or what the reviewer is asking
+you to do.
+
+Make sure your email client has a plaintext email mode and it is turned on; the
+Git list rejects HTML email. Please also follow the mailing list etiquette
+outlined in the
+https://kernel.googlesource.com/pub/scm/git/git/+/todo/MaintNotes[Maintainer's
+Note], which are similar to etiquette rules in most open source communities
+surrounding bottom-posting and inline replies.
+
+When you're making changes to your code, it is cleanest - that is, the resulting
+commits are easiest to look at - if you use `git rebase -i` (interactive
+rebase). Take a look at this
+https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/git-pocket-guide/9781449327507/ch10.html[overview]
+from O'Reilly. The general idea is to modify each commit which requires changes;
+this way, instead of having a patch A with a mistake, a patch B which was fine
+and required no upstream reviews in v1, and a patch C which fixes patch A for
+v2, you can just ship a v2 with a correct patch A and correct patch B. This is
+changing history, but since it's local history which you haven't shared with
+anyone, that is okay for now! (Later, it may not make sense to do this; take a
+look at the section below this one for some context.)
+
+[[after-approval]]
+=== After Review Approval
+
+The Git project has four integration branches: `pu`, `next`, `master`, and
+`maint`. Your change will be placed into `pu` fairly early on by the maintainer
+while it is still in the review process; from there, when it is ready for wider
+testing, it will be merged into `next`. Plenty of early testers use `next` and
+may report issues. Eventually, changes in `next` will make it to `master`,
+which is typically considered stable. Finally, when a new release is cut,
+`maint` is used to base bugfixes onto. As mentioned at the beginning of this
+document, you can read `Documents/SubmittingPatches` for some more info about
+the use of the various integration branches.
+
+Back to now: your code has been lauded by the upstream reviewers. It is perfect.
+It is ready to be accepted. You don't need to do anything else; the maintainer
+will merge your topic branch to `next` and life is good.
+
+However, if you discover it isn't so perfect after this point, you may need to
+take some special steps depending on where you are in the process.
+
+If the maintainer has announced in the "What's cooking in git.git" email that
+your topic is marked for `next` - that is, that they plan to merge it to `next`
+but have not yet done so - you should send an email asking the maintainer to
+wait a little longer: "I've sent v4 of my series and you marked it for `next`,
+but I need to change this and that - please wait for v5 before you merge it."
+
+If the topic has already been merged to `next`, rather than modifying your
+patches with `git rebase -i`, you should make further changes incrementally -
+that is, with another commit, based on top of the maintainer's topic branch as
+detailed in https://github.com/gitster/git. Your work is still in the same topic
+but is now incremental, rather than a wholesale rewrite of the topic branch.
+
+The topic branches in the maintainer's GitHub are mirrored in GitGitGadget, so
+if you're sending your reviews out that way, you should be sure to open your PR
+against the appropriate GitGitGadget/Git branch.
+
+If you're using `git send-email`, you can use it the same way as before, but you
+should generate your diffs from `<topic>..<mybranch>` and base your work on
+`<topic>` instead of `master`.
diff --git a/Documentation/RelNotes/2.23.0.txt b/Documentation/RelNotes/2.23.0.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..e3c4e78
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,348 @@
+Git 2.23 Release Notes
+======================
+
+Updates since v2.22
+-------------------
+
+Backward compatibility note
+
+ * The "--base" option of "format-patch" computed the patch-ids for
+   prerequisite patches in an unstable way, which has been updated to
+   compute in a way that is compatible with "git patch-id --stable".
+
+ * The "git log" command by default behaves as if the --mailmap option
+   was given.
+
+
+UI, Workflows & Features
+
+ * The "git fast-export/import" pair has been taught to handle commits
+   with log messages in encoding other than UTF-8 better.
+
+ * In recent versions of Git, per-worktree refs are exposed in
+   refs/worktrees/<wtname>/ hierarchy, which means that worktree names
+   must be a valid refname component.  The code now sanitizes the names
+   given to worktrees, to make sure these refs are well-formed.
+
+ * "git merge" learned "--quit" option that cleans up the in-progress
+   merge while leaving the working tree and the index still in a mess.
+
+ * "git format-patch" learns a configuration to set the default for
+   its --notes=<ref> option.
+
+ * The code to show args with potential typo that cannot be
+   interpreted as a commit-ish has been improved.
+
+ * "git clone --recurse-submodules" learned to set up the submodules
+   to ignore commit object names recorded in the superproject gitlink
+   and instead use the commits that happen to be at the tip of the
+   remote-tracking branches from the get-go, by passing the new
+   "--remote-submodules" option.
+
+ * The pattern "git diff/grep" use to extract funcname and words
+   boundary for Matlab has been extend to cover Octave, which is more
+   or less equivalent.
+
+ * "git help git" was hard to discover (well, at least for some
+   people).
+
+ * The pattern "git diff/grep" use to extract funcname and words
+   boundary for Rust has been added.
+
+ * "git status" can be told a non-standard default value for the
+   "--[no-]ahead-behind" option with a new configuration variable
+   status.aheadBehind.
+
+ * "git fetch" and "git pull" reports when a fetch results in
+   non-fast-forward updates to let the user notice unusual situation.
+   The commands learned "--no-show-forced-updates" option to disable
+   this safety feature.
+
+ * Two new commands "git switch" and "git restore" are introduced to
+   split "checking out a branch to work on advancing its history" and
+   "checking out paths out of the index and/or a tree-ish to work on
+   advancing the current history" out of the single "git checkout"
+   command.
+
+ * "git branch --list" learned to always output the detached HEAD as
+   the first item (when the HEAD is detached, of course), regardless
+   of the locale.
+
+ * The conditional inclusion mechanism learned to base the choice on
+   the branch the HEAD currently is on.
+
+ * "git rev-list --objects" learned the "--no-object-names" option to
+   squelch the path to the object that is used as a grouping hint for
+   pack-objects.
+
+ * A new tag.gpgSign configuration variable turns "git tag -a" into
+   "git tag -s".
+
+ * "git multi-pack-index" learned expire and repack subcommands.
+
+ * "git blame" learned to "ignore" commits in the history, whose
+   effects (as well as their presence) get ignored.
+
+ * "git cherry-pick/revert" learned a new "--skip" action.
+
+ * The tips of refs from the alternate object store can be used as
+   starting point for reachability computation now.
+
+ * Extra blank lines in "git status" output have been reduced.
+
+ * The commits in a repository can be described by multiple
+   commit-graph files now, which allows the commit-graph files to be
+   updated incrementally.
+
+ * "git range-diff" output has been tweaked for easier identification
+   of which part of what file the patch shown is about.
+
+
+Performance, Internal Implementation, Development Support etc.
+
+ * Update supporting parts of "git rebase" to remove code that should
+   no longer be used.
+
+ * Developer support to emulate unsatisfied prerequisites in tests to
+   ensure that the remainder of the tests still succeeds when tests
+   with prerequisites are skipped.
+
+ * "git update-server-info" learned not to rewrite the file with the
+   same contents.
+
+ * The way of specifying the path to find dynamic libraries at runtime
+   has been simplified.  The old default to pass -R/path/to/dir has been
+   replaced with the new default to pass -Wl,-rpath,/path/to/dir,
+   which is the more recent GCC uses.  Those who need to build with an
+   old GCC can still use "CC_LD_DYNPATH=-R"
+
+ * Prepare use of reachability index in topological walker that works
+   on a range (A..B).
+
+ * A new tutorial targeting specifically aspiring git-core
+   developers has been added.
+
+ * Auto-detect how to tell HP-UX aCC where to use dynamically linked
+   libraries from at runtime.
+
+ * "git mergetool" and its tests now spawn fewer subprocesses.
+
+ * Dev support update to help tracing out tests.
+
+ * Support to build with MSVC has been updated.
+
+ * "git fetch" that grabs from a group of remotes learned to run the
+   auto-gc only once at the very end.
+
+ * A handful of Windows build patches have been upstreamed.
+
+ * The code to read state files used by the sequencer machinery for
+   "git status" has been made more robust against a corrupt or stale
+   state files.
+
+ * "git for-each-ref" with multiple patterns have been optimized.
+
+ * The tree-walk API learned to pass an in-core repository
+   instance throughout more codepaths.
+
+ * When one step in multi step cherry-pick or revert is reset or
+   committed, the command line prompt script failed to notice the
+   current status, which has been improved.
+
+ * Many GIT_TEST_* environment variables control various aspects of
+   how our tests are run, but a few followed "non-empty is true, empty
+   or unset is false" while others followed the usual "there are a few
+   ways to spell true, like yes, on, etc., and also ways to spell
+   false, like no, off, etc." convention.
+
+ * Adjust the dir-iterator API and apply it to the local clone
+   optimization codepath.
+
+ * We have been trying out a few language features outside c89; the
+   coding guidelines document did not talk about them and instead had
+   a blanket ban against them.
+
+ * A test helper has been introduced to optimize preparation of test
+   repositories with many simple commits, and a handful of test
+   scripts have been updated to use it.
+
+
+Fixes since v2.22
+-----------------
+
+ * A relative pathname given to "git init --template=<path> <repo>"
+   ought to be relative to the directory "git init" gets invoked in,
+   but it instead was made relative to the repository, which has been
+   corrected.
+
+ * "git worktree add" used to fail when another worktree connected to
+   the same repository was corrupt, which has been corrected.
+
+ * The ownership rule for the file descriptor to fast-import remote
+   backend was mixed up, leading to an unrelated file descriptor getting
+   closed, which has been fixed.
+
+ * A "merge -c" instruction during "git rebase --rebase-merges" should
+   give the user a chance to edit the log message, even when there is
+   otherwise no need to create a new merge and replace the existing
+   one (i.e. fast-forward instead), but did not.  Which has been
+   corrected.
+
+ * Code cleanup and futureproof.
+
+ * More parameter validation.
+
+ * "git update-server-info" used to leave stale packfiles in its
+   output, which has been corrected.
+
+ * The server side support for "git fetch" used to show incorrect
+   value for the HEAD symbolic ref when the namespace feature is in
+   use, which has been corrected.
+
+ * "git am -i --resolved" segfaulted after trying to see a commit as
+   if it were a tree, which has been corrected.
+
+ * "git bundle verify" needs to see if prerequisite objects exist in
+   the receiving repository, but the command did not check if we are
+   in a repository upfront, which has been corrected.
+
+ * "git merge --squash" is designed to update the working tree and the
+   index without creating the commit, and this cannot be countermanded
+   by adding the "--commit" option; the command now refuses to work
+   when both options are given.
+
+ * The data collected by fsmonitor was not properly written back to
+   the on-disk index file, breaking t7519 tests occasionally, which
+   has been corrected.
+
+ * Update to Unicode 12.1 width table.
+
+ * The command line to invoke a "git cat-file" command from inside
+   "git p4" was not properly quoted to protect a caret and running a
+   broken command on Windows, which has been corrected.
+
+ * "git request-pull" learned to warn when the ref we ask them to pull
+   from in the local repository and in the published repository are
+   different.
+
+ * When creating a partial clone, the object filtering criteria is
+   recorded for the origin of the clone, but this incorrectly used a
+   hardcoded name "origin" to name that remote; it has been corrected
+   to honor the "--origin <name>" option.
+
+ * "git fetch" into a lazy clone forgot to fetch base objects that are
+   necessary to complete delta in a thin packfile, which has been
+   corrected.
+
+ * The filter_data used in the list-objects-filter (which manages a
+   lazily sparse clone repository) did not use the dynamic array API
+   correctly---'nr' is supposed to point at one past the last element
+   of the array in use.  This has been corrected.
+
+ * The description about slashes in gitignore patterns (used to
+   indicate things like "anchored to this level only" and "only
+   matches directories") has been revamped.
+
+ * The URL decoding code has been updated to avoid going past the end
+   of the string while parsing %-<hex>-<hex> sequence.
+
+ * The list of for-each like macros used by clang-format has been
+   updated.
+
+ * "git branch --list" learned to show branches that are checked out
+   in other worktrees connected to the same repository prefixed with
+   '+', similar to the way the currently checked out branch is shown
+   with '*' in front.
+   (merge 6e9381469e nb/branch-show-other-worktrees-head later to maint).
+
+ * Code restructuring during 2.20 period broke fetching tags via
+   "import" based transports.
+
+ * The commit-graph file is now part of the "files that the runtime
+   may keep open file descriptors on, all of which would need to be
+   closed when done with the object store", and the file descriptor to
+   an existing commit-graph file now is closed before "gc" finalizes a
+   new instance to replace it.
+
+ * "git checkout -p" needs to selectively apply a patch in reverse,
+   which did not work well.
+
+ * Code clean-up to avoid signed integer wraparounds during binary search.
+
+ * "git interpret-trailers" always treated '#' as the comment
+   character, regardless of core.commentChar setting, which has been
+   corrected.
+
+ * "git stash show 23" used to work, but no more after getting
+   rewritten in C; this regression has been corrected.
+
+ * "git rebase --abort" used to leave refs/rewritten/ when concluding
+   "git rebase -r", which has been corrected.
+
+ * An incorrect list of options was cached after command line
+   completion failed (e.g. trying to complete a command that requires
+   a repository outside one), which has been corrected.
+
+ * The code to parse scaled numbers out of configuration files has
+   been made more robust and also easier to follow.
+
+ * The codepath to compute delta islands used to spew progress output
+   without giving the callers any way to squelch it, which has been
+   fixed.
+
+ * Protocol capabilities that go over wire should never be translated,
+   but it was incorrectly marked for translation, which has been
+   corrected.  The output of protocol capabilities for debugging has
+   been tweaked a bit.
+
+ * Use "Erase in Line" CSI sequence that is already used in the editor
+   support to clear cruft in the progress output.
+
+ * "git submodule foreach" did not protect command line options passed
+   to the command to be run in each submodule correctly, when the
+   "--recursive" option was in use.
+
+ * The configuration variable rebase.rescheduleFailedExec should be
+   effective only while running an interactive rebase and should not
+   affect anything when running a non-interactive one, which was not
+   the case.  This has been corrected.
+
+ * The "git clone" documentation refers to command line options in its
+   description in the short form; they have been replaced with long
+   forms to make them more recognisable.
+
+ * Generation of pack bitmaps are now disabled when .keep files exist,
+   as these are mutually exclusive features.
+   (merge 7328482253 ew/repack-with-bitmaps-by-default later to maint).
+
+ * "git rm" to resolve a conflicted path leaked an internal message
+   "needs merge" before actually removing the path, which was
+   confusing.  This has been corrected.
+
+ * "git stash --keep-index" did not work correctly on paths that have
+   been removed, which has been fixed.
+   (merge b932f6a5e8 tg/stash-keep-index-with-removed-paths later to maint).
+
+ * Window 7 update ;-)
+
+ * A codepath that reads from GPG for signed object verification read
+   past the end of allocated buffer, which has been fixed.
+
+ * "git clean" silently skipped a path when it cannot lstat() it; now
+   it gives a warning.
+
+ * "git push --atomic" that goes over the transport-helper (namely,
+   the smart http transport) failed to prevent refs to be pushed when
+   it can locally tell that one of the ref update will fail without
+   having to consult the other end, which has been corrected.
+
+ * The internal diff machinery can be made to read out of bounds while
+   looking for --function-context line in a corner case, which has been
+   corrected.
+   (merge b777f3fd61 jk/xdiff-clamp-funcname-context-index later to maint).
+
+ * Other code cleanup, docfix, build fix, etc.
+   (merge fbec05c210 cc/test-oidmap later to maint).
+   (merge 7a06fb038c jk/no-system-includes-in-dot-c later to maint).
+   (merge 81ed2b405c cb/xdiff-no-system-includes-in-dot-c later to maint).
+   (merge d61e6ce1dd sg/fsck-config-in-doc later to maint).
diff --git a/Documentation/RelNotes/2.24.0.txt b/Documentation/RelNotes/2.24.0.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..ff48d85
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,143 @@
+Git 2.24 Release Notes
+======================
+
+Updates since v2.23
+-------------------
+
+Backward compatibility note
+
+ * (no entry yet so far)
+
+
+UI, Workflows & Features
+
+ * We now have an active interim maintainer for the Git-Gui part of
+   the system.  Praise and thank Pratyush Yadav for volunteering.
+
+ * The command line parser learned "--end-of-options" notation; the
+   standard convention for scripters to have hardcoded set of options
+   first on the command line, and force the command to treat end-user
+   input as non-options, has been to use "--" as the delimiter, but
+   that would not work for commands that use "--" as a delimiter
+   between revs and pathspec.
+
+ * A mechanism to affect the default setting for a (related) group of
+   configuration variables is introduced.
+
+ * "git fetch" learned "--set-upstream" option to help those who first
+   clone from their private fork they intend to push to, add the true
+   upstream via "git remote add" and then "git fetch" from it.
+
+ * Device-tree files learned their own userdiff patterns.
+   (merge 3c81760bc6 sb/userdiff-dts later to maint).
+
+ * "git rebase --rebase-merges" learned to drive different merge
+   strategies and pass strategy specific options to them.
+
+ * A new "pre-merge-commit" hook has been introduced.
+
+ * Command line completion updates for "git -c var.name=val" have been
+   added.
+
+ * The lazy clone machinery has been taught that there can be more
+   than one promisor remote and consult them in order when downloading
+   missing objects on demand.
+
+ * The list-objects-filter API (used to create a sparse/lazy clone)
+   learned to take a combined filter specification.
+
+
+Performance, Internal Implementation, Development Support etc.
+
+ * The code to write commit-graph over given commit object names has
+   been made a bit more robust.
+
+ * The first line of verbose output from each test piece now carries
+   the test name and number to help scanning with eyeballs.
+
+ * Further clean-up of the initialization code.
+
+ * xmalloc() used to have a mechanism to ditch memory and address
+   space resources as the last resort upon seeing an allocation
+   failure from the underlying malloc(), which made the code complex
+   and thread-unsafe with dubious benefit, as major memory resource
+   users already do limit their uses with various other mechanisms.
+   It has been simplified away.
+
+ * Unnecessary full-tree diff in "git log -L" machinery has been
+   optimized away.
+
+ * The http transport lacked some optimization the native transports
+   learned to avoid unnecessary ref advertisement, which has been
+   corrected.
+
+
+Fixes since v2.23
+-----------------
+
+ * "git grep --recurse-submodules" that looks at the working tree
+   files looked at the contents in the index in submodules, instead of
+   files in the working tree.
+   (merge 6a289d45c0 mt/grep-submodules-working-tree later to maint).
+
+ * Codepaths to walk tree objects have been audited for integer
+   overflows and hardened.
+   (merge 5aa02f9868 jk/tree-walk-overflow later to maint).
+
+ * "git pack-refs" can lose refs that are created while running, which
+   is getting corrected.
+   (merge a613d4f817 sc/pack-refs-deletion-racefix later to maint).
+
+ * "git checkout" and "git restore" to re-populate the index from a
+   tree-ish (typically HEAD) did not work correctly for a path that
+   was removed and then added again with the intent-to-add bit, when
+   the corresponding working tree file was empty.  This has been
+   corrected.
+
+ * Compilation fix.
+   (merge 70597e8386 rs/nedalloc-fixlets later to maint).
+
+ * "git gui" learned to call the clean-up procedure before exiting.
+   (merge 0d88f3d2c5 py/git-gui-do-quit later to maint).
+
+ * We promoted the "indent heuristics" that decides where to split
+   diff hunks from experimental to the default a few years ago, but
+   some stale documentation still marked it as experimental, which has
+   been corrected.
+   (merge 64e5e1fba1 sg/diff-indent-heuristic-non-experimental later to maint).
+
+ * Fix a mismerge that happened in 2.22 timeframe.
+   (merge acb7da05ac en/checkout-mismerge-fix later to maint).
+
+ * "git archive" recorded incorrect length in extended pax header in
+   some corner cases, which has been corrected.
+   (merge 71d41ff651 rs/pax-extended-header-length-fix later to maint).
+
+ * On-demand object fetching in lazy clone incorrectly tried to fetch
+   commits from submodule projects, while still working in the
+   superproject, which has been corrected.
+   (merge a63694f523 jt/diff-lazy-fetch-submodule-fix later to maint).
+
+ * Prepare get_short_oid() codepath to be thread-safe.
+   (merge 7cfcb16b0e rs/sort-oid-array-thread-safe later to maint).
+
+ * "for-each-ref" and friends that show refs did not protect themselves
+   against ancient tags that did not record tagger names when asked to
+   show "%(taggername)", which have been corrected.
+   (merge 8b3f33ef11 mp/for-each-ref-missing-name-or-email later to maint).
+
+ * The "git am" based backend of "git rebase" ignored the result of
+   updating ".gitattributes" done in one step when replaying
+   subsequent steps.
+   (merge 2c65d90f75 bc/reread-attributes-during-rebase later to maint).
+
+ * Tell cURL library to use the same malloc() implementation, with the
+   xmalloc() wrapper, as the rest of the system, for consistency.
+   (merge 93b980e58f cb/curl-use-xmalloc later to maint).
+
+ * Other code cleanup, docfix, build fix, etc.
+   (merge d1387d3895 en/fast-import-merge-doc later to maint).
+   (merge 1c24a54ea4 bm/repository-layout-typofix later to maint).
+   (merge 415b770b88 ds/midx-expire-repack later to maint).
+   (merge 19800bdc3f nd/diff-parseopt later to maint).
+   (merge 58166c2e9d tg/t0021-racefix later to maint).
index dc41957..5d122db 100644 (file)
@@ -110,5 +110,24 @@ commit. And the default value is 40. If there are more than one
 `-C` options given, the <num> argument of the last `-C` will
 take effect.
 
+--ignore-rev <rev>::
+       Ignore changes made by the revision when assigning blame, as if the
+       change never happened.  Lines that were changed or added by an ignored
+       commit will be blamed on the previous commit that changed that line or
+       nearby lines.  This option may be specified multiple times to ignore
+       more than one revision.  If the `blame.markIgnoredLines` config option
+       is set, then lines that were changed by an ignored commit and attributed to
+       another commit will be marked with a `?` in the blame output.  If the
+       `blame.markUnblamableLines` config option is set, then those lines touched
+       by an ignored commit that we could not attribute to another revision are
+       marked with a '*'.
+
+--ignore-revs-file <file>::
+       Ignore revisions listed in `file`, which must be in the same format as an
+       `fsck.skipList`.  This option may be repeated, and these files will be
+       processed after any files specified with the `blame.ignoreRevsFile` config
+       option.  An empty file name, `""`, will clear the list of revs from
+       previously processed files.
+
 -h::
        Show help message.
index 7e2a6f6..77f3b14 100644 (file)
@@ -144,6 +144,20 @@ refer to linkgit:gitignore[5] for details. For convenience:
        This is the same as `gitdir` except that matching is done
        case-insensitively (e.g. on case-insensitive file sytems)
 
+`onbranch`::
+       The data that follows the keyword `onbranch:` is taken to be a
+       pattern with standard globbing wildcards and two additional
+       ones, `**/` and `/**`, that can match multiple path components.
+       If we are in a worktree where the name of the branch that is
+       currently checked out matches the pattern, the include condition
+       is met.
++
+If the pattern ends with `/`, `**` will be automatically added. For
+example, the pattern `foo/` becomes `foo/**`. In other words, it matches
+all branches that begin with `foo/`. This is useful if your branches are
+organized hierarchically and you would like to apply a configuration to
+all the branches in that hierarchy.
+
 A few more notes on matching via `gitdir` and `gitdir/i`:
 
  * Symlinks in `$GIT_DIR` are not resolved before matching.
@@ -206,6 +220,11 @@ Example
        [includeIf "gitdir:/path/to/group/"]
                path = foo.inc
 
+       ; include only if we are in a worktree where foo-branch is
+       ; currently checked out
+       [includeIf "onbranch:foo-branch"]
+               path = foo.inc
+
 Values
 ~~~~~~
 
@@ -326,6 +345,8 @@ include::config/difftool.txt[]
 
 include::config/fastimport.txt[]
 
+include::config/feature.txt[]
+
 include::config/fetch.txt[]
 
 include::config/format.txt[]
index ec4f6ae..6aaa360 100644 (file)
@@ -4,6 +4,10 @@ advice.*::
        can tell Git that you do not need help by setting these to 'false':
 +
 --
+       fetchShowForcedUpdates::
+               Advice shown when linkgit:git-fetch[1] takes a long time
+               to calculate forced updates after ref updates, or to warn
+               that the check is disabled.
        pushUpdateRejected::
                Set this variable to 'false' if you want to disable
                'pushNonFFCurrent',
@@ -37,12 +41,19 @@ advice.*::
                we can still suggest that the user push to either
                refs/heads/* or refs/tags/* based on the type of the
                source object.
+       statusAheadBehind::
+               Shown when linkgit:git-status[1] computes the ahead/behind
+               counts for a local ref compared to its remote tracking ref,
+               and that calculation takes longer than expected. Will not
+               appear if `status.aheadBehind` is false or the option
+               `--no-ahead-behind` is given.
        statusHints::
                Show directions on how to proceed from the current
                state in the output of linkgit:git-status[1], in
                the template shown when writing commit messages in
                linkgit:git-commit[1], and in the help message shown
-               by linkgit:git-checkout[1] when switching branch.
+               by linkgit:git-switch[1] or
+               linkgit:git-checkout[1] when switching branch.
        statusUoption::
                Advise to consider using the `-u` option to linkgit:git-status[1]
                when the command takes more than 2 seconds to enumerate untracked
@@ -57,17 +68,21 @@ advice.*::
        resolveConflict::
                Advice shown by various commands when conflicts
                prevent the operation from being performed.
+       sequencerInUse::
+               Advice shown when a sequencer command is already in progress.
        implicitIdentity::
                Advice on how to set your identity configuration when
                your information is guessed from the system username and
                domain name.
        detachedHead::
-               Advice shown when you used linkgit:git-checkout[1] to
-               move to the detach HEAD state, to instruct how to create
-               a local branch after the fact.
+               Advice shown when you used
+               linkgit:git-switch[1] or linkgit:git-checkout[1]
+               to move to the detach HEAD state, to instruct how to
+               create a local branch after the fact.
        checkoutAmbiguousRemoteBranchName::
                Advice shown when the argument to
-               linkgit:git-checkout[1] ambiguously resolves to a
+               linkgit:git-checkout[1] and linkgit:git-switch[1]
+               ambiguously resolves to a
                remote tracking branch on more than one remote in
                situations where an unambiguous argument would have
                otherwise caused a remote-tracking branch to be
index 67b5c1d..9468e85 100644 (file)
@@ -19,3 +19,19 @@ blame.showEmail::
 blame.showRoot::
        Do not treat root commits as boundaries in linkgit:git-blame[1].
        This option defaults to false.
+
+blame.ignoreRevsFile::
+       Ignore revisions listed in the file, one unabbreviated object name per
+       line, in linkgit:git-blame[1].  Whitespace and comments beginning with
+       `#` are ignored.  This option may be repeated multiple times.  Empty
+       file names will reset the list of ignored revisions.  This option will
+       be handled before the command line option `--ignore-revs-file`.
+
+blame.markUnblamables::
+       Mark lines that were changed by an ignored revision that we could not
+       attribute to another commit with a '*' in the output of
+       linkgit:git-blame[1].
+
+blame.markIgnoredLines::
+       Mark lines that were changed by an ignored revision that we attributed to
+       another commit with a '?' in the output of linkgit:git-blame[1].
index 8f4b3fa..a592d52 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 branch.autoSetupMerge::
-       Tells 'git branch' and 'git checkout' to set up new branches
+       Tells 'git branch', 'git switch' and 'git checkout' to set up new branches
        so that linkgit:git-pull[1] will appropriately merge from the
        starting point branch. Note that even if this option is not set,
        this behavior can be chosen per-branch using the `--track`
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ branch.autoSetupMerge::
        branch. This option defaults to true.
 
 branch.autoSetupRebase::
-       When a new branch is created with 'git branch' or 'git checkout'
+       When a new branch is created with 'git branch', 'git switch' or 'git checkout'
        that tracks another branch, this variable tells Git to set
        up pull to rebase instead of merge (see "branch.<name>.rebase").
        When `never`, rebase is never automatically set to true.
index c4118fa..6b64681 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,6 @@
 checkout.defaultRemote::
-       When you run 'git checkout <something>' and only have one
+       When you run 'git checkout <something>'
+       or 'git switch <something>' and only have one
        remote, it may implicitly fall back on checking out and
        tracking e.g. 'origin/<something>'. This stops working as soon
        as you have more than one remote with a '<something>'
@@ -8,16 +9,10 @@ checkout.defaultRemote::
        disambiguation. The typical use-case is to set this to
        `origin`.
 +
-Currently this is used by linkgit:git-checkout[1] when 'git checkout
-<something>' will checkout the '<something>' branch on another remote,
+Currently this is used by linkgit:git-switch[1] and
+linkgit:git-checkout[1] when 'git checkout <something>'
+or 'git switch <something>'
+will checkout the '<something>' branch on another remote,
 and by linkgit:git-worktree[1] when 'git worktree add' refers to a
 remote branch. This setting might be used for other checkout-like
 commands or functionality in the future.
-
-checkout.optimizeNewBranch::
-       Optimizes the performance of "git checkout -b <new_branch>" when
-       using sparse-checkout.  When set to true, git will not update the
-       repo based on the current sparse-checkout settings.  This means it
-       will not update the skip-worktree bit in the index nor add/remove
-       files in the working directory to reflect the current sparse checkout
-       settings nor will it show the local changes.
index 8375596..d5daacb 100644 (file)
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ color.blame.highlightRecent::
 +
 This setting should be set to a comma-separated list of color and date settings,
 starting and ending with a color, the dates should be set from oldest to newest.
-The metadata will be colored given the colors if the the line was introduced
+The metadata will be colored given the colors if the line was introduced
 before the given timestamp, overwriting older timestamped colors.
 +
 Instead of an absolute timestamp relative timestamps work as well, e.g.
index 75538d2..852d2ba 100644 (file)
@@ -86,7 +86,9 @@ core.untrackedCache::
        it will automatically be removed, if set to `false`. Before
        setting it to `true`, you should check that mtime is working
        properly on your system.
-       See linkgit:git-update-index[1]. `keep` by default.
+       See linkgit:git-update-index[1]. `keep` by default, unless
+       `feature.manyFiles` is enabled which sets this setting to
+       `true` by default.
 
 core.checkStat::
        When missing or is set to `default`, many fields in the stat
@@ -577,7 +579,7 @@ the `GIT_NOTES_REF` environment variable.  See linkgit:git-notes[1].
 
 core.commitGraph::
        If true, then git will read the commit-graph file (if it exists)
-       to parse the graph structure of commits. Defaults to false. See
+       to parse the graph structure of commits. Defaults to true. See
        linkgit:git-commit-graph[1] for more information.
 
 core.useReplaceRefs::
index 2c4c9ba..ff09f1c 100644 (file)
@@ -78,7 +78,8 @@ diff.external::
 diff.ignoreSubmodules::
        Sets the default value of --ignore-submodules. Note that this
        affects only 'git diff' Porcelain, and not lower level 'diff'
-       commands such as 'git diff-files'. 'git checkout' also honors
+       commands such as 'git diff-files'. 'git checkout'
+       and 'git switch' also honor
        this setting when reporting uncommitted changes. Setting it to
        'all' disables the submodule summary normally shown by 'git commit'
        and 'git status' when `status.submoduleSummary` is set unless it is
@@ -188,7 +189,7 @@ diff.guitool::
 include::../mergetools-diff.txt[]
 
 diff.indentHeuristic::
-       Set this option to `true` to enable experimental heuristics
+       Set this option to `false` to disable the default heuristics
        that shift diff hunk boundaries to make patches easier to read.
 
 diff.algorithm::
diff --git a/Documentation/config/feature.txt b/Documentation/config/feature.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..545522f
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,29 @@
+feature.*::
+       The config settings that start with `feature.` modify the defaults of
+       a group of other config settings. These groups are created by the Git
+       developer community as recommended defaults and are subject to change.
+       In particular, new config options may be added with different defaults.
+
+feature.experimental::
+       Enable config options that are new to Git, and are being considered for
+       future defaults. Config settings included here may be added or removed
+       with each release, including minor version updates. These settings may
+       have unintended interactions since they are so new. Please enable this
+       setting if you are interested in providing feedback on experimental
+       features. The new default values are:
++
+* `pack.useSparse=true` uses a new algorithm when constructing a pack-file
+which can improve `git push` performance in repos with many files.
++
+* `fetch.negotiationAlgorithm=skipping` may improve fetch negotiation times by
+skipping more commits at a time, reducing the number of round trips.
+
+feature.manyFiles::
+       Enable config options that optimize for repos with many files in the
+       working directory. With many files, commands such as `git status` and
+       `git checkout` may be slow and these new defaults improve performance:
++
+* `index.version=4` enables path-prefix compression in the index.
++
+* `core.untrackedCache=true` enables the untracked cache. This setting assumes
+that mtime is working on your machine.
index cbfad6c..d402110 100644 (file)
@@ -59,7 +59,13 @@ fetch.negotiationAlgorithm::
        effort to converge faster, but may result in a larger-than-necessary
        packfile; The default is "default" which instructs Git to use the default algorithm
        that never skips commits (unless the server has acknowledged it or one
-       of its descendants).
+       of its descendants). If `feature.experimental` is enabled, then this
+       setting defaults to "skipping".
        Unknown values will cause 'git fetch' to error out.
 +
 See also the `--negotiation-tip` option for linkgit:git-fetch[1].
+
+fetch.showForcedUpdates::
+       Set to false to enable `--no-show-forced-updates` in
+       linkgit:git-fetch[1] and linkgit:git-pull[1] commands.
+       Defaults to true.
index dc77941..414a5a8 100644 (file)
@@ -85,3 +85,18 @@ format.outputDirectory::
 format.useAutoBase::
        A boolean value which lets you enable the `--base=auto` option of
        format-patch by default.
+
+format.notes::
+       Provides the default value for the `--notes` option to
+       format-patch. Accepts a boolean value, or a ref which specifies
+       where to get notes. If false, format-patch defaults to
+       `--no-notes`. If true, format-patch defaults to `--notes`. If
+       set to a non-boolean value, format-patch defaults to
+       `--notes=<ref>`, where `ref` is the non-boolean value. Defaults
+       to false.
++
+If one wishes to use the ref `ref/notes/true`, please use that literal
+instead.
++
+This configuration can be specified multiple times in order to allow
+multiple notes refs to be included.
index 02b92b1..00ea0a6 100644 (file)
@@ -63,7 +63,7 @@ gc.writeCommitGraph::
        If true, then gc will rewrite the commit-graph file when
        linkgit:git-gc[1] is run. When using `git gc --auto`
        the commit-graph will be updated if housekeeping is
-       required. Default is false. See linkgit:git-commit-graph[1]
+       required. Default is true. See linkgit:git-commit-graph[1]
        for details.
 
 gc.logExpiry::
index f181503..7cb50b3 100644 (file)
@@ -24,3 +24,4 @@ index.threads::
 index.version::
        Specify the version with which new index files should be
        initialized.  This does not affect existing repositories.
+       If `feature.manyFiles` is enabled, then the default is 4.
index ad846dd..a2d3c7e 100644 (file)
@@ -2,7 +2,8 @@ interactive.singleKey::
        In interactive commands, allow the user to provide one-letter
        input with a single key (i.e., without hitting enter).
        Currently this is used by the `--patch` mode of
-       linkgit:git-add[1], linkgit:git-checkout[1], linkgit:git-commit[1],
+       linkgit:git-add[1], linkgit:git-checkout[1],
+       linkgit:git-restore[1], linkgit:git-commit[1],
        linkgit:git-reset[1], and linkgit:git-stash[1]. Note that this
        setting is silently ignored if portable keystroke input
        is not available; requires the Perl module Term::ReadKey.
index 78d9e44..e9e1e39 100644 (file)
@@ -40,4 +40,5 @@ log.showSignature::
 
 log.mailmap::
        If true, makes linkgit:git-log[1], linkgit:git-show[1], and
-       linkgit:git-whatchanged[1] assume `--use-mailmap`.
+       linkgit:git-whatchanged[1] assume `--use-mailmap`, otherwise
+       assume `--no-use-mailmap`. True by default.
index 9cdcfa7..1d66f0c 100644 (file)
@@ -112,7 +112,8 @@ pack.useSparse::
        objects. This can have significant performance benefits when
        computing a pack to send a small change. However, it is possible
        that extra objects are added to the pack-file if the included
-       commits contain certain types of direct renames.
+       commits contain certain types of direct renames. Default is `false`
+       unless `feature.experimental` is enabled.
 
 pack.writeBitmaps (deprecated)::
        This is a deprecated synonym for `repack.writeBitmaps`.
index 6c4cad8..a8e6437 100644 (file)
@@ -76,3 +76,11 @@ remote.<name>.pruneTags::
 +
 See also `remote.<name>.prune` and the PRUNING section of
 linkgit:git-fetch[1].
+
+remote.<name>.promisor::
+       When set to true, this remote will be used to fetch promisor
+       objects.
+
+remote.<name>.partialclonefilter::
+       The filter that will be applied when fetching from this
+       promisor remote.
index 7710758..abc7ef4 100644 (file)
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@ stash.useBuiltin::
        the built-in rewrite of it in C.
 +
 The C rewrite is first included with Git version 2.22 (and Git for Windows
-version 2.19). This option serves an an escape hatch to re-enable the
+version 2.19). This option serves as an escape hatch to re-enable the
 legacy version in case any bugs are found in the rewrite. This option and
 the shell script version of linkgit:git-stash[1] will be removed in some
 future release.
index ed72fa7..0fc704a 100644 (file)
@@ -12,6 +12,11 @@ status.branch::
        Set to true to enable --branch by default in linkgit:git-status[1].
        The option --no-branch takes precedence over this variable.
 
+status.aheadBehind::
+       Set to true to enable `--ahead-behind` and false to enable
+       `--no-ahead-behind` by default in linkgit:git-status[1] for
+       non-porcelain status formats.  Defaults to true.
+
 status.displayCommentPrefix::
        If set to true, linkgit:git-status[1] will insert a comment
        prefix before each output line (starting with
index 663663b..ef5adb3 100644 (file)
@@ -8,6 +8,14 @@ tag.sort::
        linkgit:git-tag[1]. Without the "--sort=<value>" option provided, the
        value of this variable will be used as the default.
 
+tag.gpgSign::
+       A boolean to specify whether all tags should be GPG signed.
+       Use of this option when running in an automated script can
+       result in a large number of tags being signed. It is therefore
+       convenient to use an agent to avoid typing your gpg passphrase
+       several times. Note that this option doesn't affects tag signing
+       behavior enabled by "-u <keyid>" or "--local-user=<keyid>" options.
+
 tar.umask::
        This variable can be used to restrict the permission bits of
        tar archive entries.  The default is 0002, which turns off the
index 4a5dfe2..f5b6245 100644 (file)
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ linkgit:git-receive-pack[1]. On the fetch side, malformed objects will
 instead be left unreferenced in the repository.
 +
 Due to the non-quarantine nature of the `fetch.fsckObjects`
-implementation it can not be relied upon to leave the object store
+implementation it cannot be relied upon to leave the object store
 clean like `receive.fsckObjects` can.
 +
 As objects are unpacked they're written to the object store, so there
index 91c4775..99df1f3 100644 (file)
@@ -88,6 +88,10 @@ ifndef::git-pull[]
        Allow several <repository> and <group> arguments to be
        specified. No <refspec>s may be specified.
 
+--[no-]auto-gc::
+       Run `git gc --auto` at the end to perform garbage collection
+       if needed. This is enabled by default.
+
 -p::
 --prune::
        Before fetching, remove any remote-tracking references that no
@@ -165,6 +169,13 @@ ifndef::git-pull[]
        Disable recursive fetching of submodules (this has the same effect as
        using the `--recurse-submodules=no` option).
 
+--set-upstream::
+       If the remote is fetched successfully, pull and add upstream
+       (tracking) reference, used by argument-less
+       linkgit:git-pull[1] and other commands. For more information,
+       see `branch.<name>.merge` and `branch.<name>.remote` in
+       linkgit:git-config[1].
+
 --submodule-prefix=<path>::
        Prepend <path> to paths printed in informative messages
        such as "Fetching submodule foo".  This option is used
@@ -221,6 +232,19 @@ endif::git-pull[]
        When multiple `--server-option=<option>` are given, they are all
        sent to the other side in the order listed on the command line.
 
+--show-forced-updates::
+       By default, git checks if a branch is force-updated during
+       fetch. This can be disabled through fetch.showForcedUpdates, but
+       the --show-forced-updates option guarantees this check occurs.
+       See linkgit:git-config[1].
+
+--no-show-forced-updates::
+       By default, git checks if a branch is force-updated during
+       fetch. Pass --no-show-forced-updates or set fetch.showForcedUpdates
+       to false to skip this check for performance reasons. If used during
+       'git-pull' the --ff-only option will still check for forced updates
+       before attempting a fast-forward update. See linkgit:git-config[1].
+
 -4::
 --ipv4::
        Use IPv4 addresses only, ignoring IPv6 addresses.
index 16323eb..7e81541 100644 (file)
@@ -10,6 +10,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
 [verse]
 'git blame' [-c] [-b] [-l] [--root] [-t] [-f] [-n] [-s] [-e] [-p] [-w] [--incremental]
            [-L <range>] [-S <revs-file>] [-M] [-C] [-C] [-C] [--since=<date>]
+           [--ignore-rev <rev>] [--ignore-revs-file <file>]
            [--progress] [--abbrev=<n>] [<rev> | --contents <file> | --reverse <rev>..<rev>]
            [--] <file>
 
index d9325e2..135206f 100644 (file)
@@ -8,9 +8,8 @@ git-branch - List, create, or delete branches
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
 [verse]
-'git branch' [--color[=<when>] | --no-color]
+'git branch' [--color[=<when>] | --no-color] [--show-current]
        [-v [--abbrev=<length> | --no-abbrev]]
-       [--show-current]
        [--column[=<options>] | --no-column] [--sort=<key>]
        [(--merged | --no-merged) [<commit>]]
        [--contains [<commit]] [--no-contains [<commit>]]
@@ -29,8 +28,10 @@ DESCRIPTION
 -----------
 
 If `--list` is given, or if there are no non-option arguments, existing
-branches are listed; the current branch will be highlighted with an
-asterisk.  Option `-r` causes the remote-tracking branches to be listed,
+branches are listed; the current branch will be highlighted in green and
+marked with an asterisk.  Any branches checked out in linked worktrees will
+be highlighted in cyan and marked with a plus sign. Option `-r` causes the
+remote-tracking branches to be listed,
 and option `-a` shows both local and remote branches.
 
 If a `<pattern>`
@@ -59,7 +60,7 @@ can leave out at most one of `A` and `B`, in which case it defaults to
 `HEAD`.
 
 Note that this will create the new branch, but it will not switch the
-working tree to it; use "git checkout <newbranch>" to switch to the
+working tree to it; use "git switch <newbranch>" to switch to the
 new branch.
 
 When a local branch is started off a remote-tracking branch, Git sets up the
@@ -183,8 +184,10 @@ This option is only applicable in non-verbose mode.
        When in list mode,
        show sha1 and commit subject line for each head, along with
        relationship to upstream branch (if any). If given twice, print
-       the name of the upstream branch, as well (see also `git remote
-       show <remote>`).
+       the path of the linked worktree (if any) and the name of the upstream
+       branch, as well (see also `git remote show <remote>`).  Note that the
+       current worktree's HEAD will not have its path printed (it will always
+       be your current directory).
 
 -q::
 --quiet::
@@ -211,7 +214,7 @@ This option is only applicable in non-verbose mode.
 +
 This behavior is the default when the start point is a remote-tracking branch.
 Set the branch.autoSetupMerge configuration variable to `false` if you
-want `git checkout` and `git branch` to always behave as if `--no-track`
+want `git switch`, `git checkout` and `git branch` to always behave as if `--no-track`
 were given. Set it to `always` if you want this behavior when the
 start-point is either a local or remote-tracking branch.
 
@@ -310,7 +313,7 @@ Start development from a known tag::
 $ git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/.../linux-2.6 my2.6
 $ cd my2.6
 $ git branch my2.6.14 v2.6.14   <1>
-$ git checkout my2.6.14
+$ git switch my2.6.14
 ------------
 +
 <1> This step and the next one could be combined into a single step with
@@ -347,9 +350,9 @@ Patterns will normally need quoting.
 NOTES
 -----
 
-If you are creating a branch that you want to checkout immediately, it is
-easier to use the git checkout command with its `-b` option to create
-a branch and check it out with a single command.
+If you are creating a branch that you want to switch to immediately,
+it is easier to use the "git switch" command with its `-c` option to
+do the same thing with a single command.
 
 The options `--contains`, `--no-contains`, `--merged` and `--no-merged`
 serve four related but different purposes:
index d9de992..ee6a414 100644 (file)
@@ -88,7 +88,8 @@ but it is explicitly forbidden at the beginning of a branch name).
 When run with `--branch` option in a repository, the input is first
 expanded for the ``previous checkout syntax''
 `@{-n}`.  For example, `@{-1}` is a way to refer the last thing that
-was checked out using "git checkout" operation. This option should be
+was checked out using "git switch" or "git checkout" operation.
+This option should be
 used by porcelains to accept this syntax anywhere a branch name is
 expected, so they can act as if you typed the branch name. As an
 exception note that, the ``previous checkout operation'' might result
index 964f912..cf3cac0 100644 (file)
@@ -23,31 +23,22 @@ or the specified tree.  If no paths are given, 'git checkout' will
 also update `HEAD` to set the specified branch as the current
 branch.
 
-'git checkout' <branch>::
-       To prepare for working on <branch>, switch to it by updating
+'git checkout' [<branch>]::
+       To prepare for working on `<branch>`, switch to it by updating
        the index and the files in the working tree, and by pointing
-       HEAD at the branch. Local modifications to the files in the
+       `HEAD` at the branch. Local modifications to the files in the
        working tree are kept, so that they can be committed to the
-       <branch>.
+       `<branch>`.
 +
-If <branch> is not found but there does exist a tracking branch in
-exactly one remote (call it <remote>) with a matching name, treat as
-equivalent to
+If `<branch>` is not found but there does exist a tracking branch in
+exactly one remote (call it `<remote>`) with a matching name and
+`--no-guess` is not specified, treat as equivalent to
 +
 ------------
 $ git checkout -b <branch> --track <remote>/<branch>
 ------------
 +
-If the branch exists in multiple remotes and one of them is named by
-the `checkout.defaultRemote` configuration variable, we'll use that
-one for the purposes of disambiguation, even if the `<branch>` isn't
-unique across all remotes. Set it to
-e.g. `checkout.defaultRemote=origin` to always checkout remote
-branches from there if `<branch>` is ambiguous but exists on the
-'origin' remote. See also `checkout.defaultRemote` in
-linkgit:git-config[1].
-+
-You could omit <branch>, in which case the command degenerates to
+You could omit `<branch>`, in which case the command degenerates to
 "check out the current branch", which is a glorified no-op with
 rather expensive side-effects to show only the tracking information,
 if exists, for the current branch.
@@ -61,7 +52,7 @@ if exists, for the current branch.
        `--track` without `-b` implies branch creation; see the
        description of `--track` below.
 +
-If `-B` is given, <new_branch> is created if it doesn't exist; otherwise, it
+If `-B` is given, `<new_branch>` is created if it doesn't exist; otherwise, it
 is reset. This is the transactional equivalent of
 +
 ------------
@@ -75,25 +66,25 @@ successful.
 'git checkout' --detach [<branch>]::
 'git checkout' [--detach] <commit>::
 
-       Prepare to work on top of <commit>, by detaching HEAD at it
+       Prepare to work on top of `<commit>`, by detaching `HEAD` at it
        (see "DETACHED HEAD" section), and updating the index and the
        files in the working tree.  Local modifications to the files
        in the working tree are kept, so that the resulting working
        tree will be the state recorded in the commit plus the local
        modifications.
 +
-When the <commit> argument is a branch name, the `--detach` option can
-be used to detach HEAD at the tip of the branch (`git checkout
-<branch>` would check out that branch without detaching HEAD).
+When the `<commit>` argument is a branch name, the `--detach` option can
+be used to detach `HEAD` at the tip of the branch (`git checkout
+<branch>` would check out that branch without detaching `HEAD`).
 +
-Omitting <branch> detaches HEAD at the tip of the current branch.
+Omitting `<branch>` detaches `HEAD` at the tip of the current branch.
 
 'git checkout' [<tree-ish>] [--] <pathspec>...::
 
        Overwrite paths in the working tree by replacing with the
-       contents in the index or in the <tree-ish> (most often a
-       commit).  When a <tree-ish> is given, the paths that
-       match the <pathspec> are updated both in the index and in
+       contents in the index or in the `<tree-ish>` (most often a
+       commit).  When a `<tree-ish>` is given, the paths that
+       match the `<pathspec>` are updated both in the index and in
        the working tree.
 +
 The index may contain unmerged entries because of a previous failed merge.
@@ -118,7 +109,8 @@ OPTIONS
 --quiet::
        Quiet, suppress feedback messages.
 
---[no-]progress::
+--progress::
+--no-progress::
        Progress status is reported on the standard error stream
        by default when it is attached to a terminal, unless `--quiet`
        is specified. This flag enables progress reporting even if not
@@ -127,7 +119,7 @@ OPTIONS
 -f::
 --force::
        When switching branches, proceed even if the index or the
-       working tree differs from HEAD.  This is used to throw away
+       working tree differs from `HEAD`.  This is used to throw away
        local changes.
 +
 When checking out paths from the index, do not fail upon unmerged
@@ -154,12 +146,12 @@ on your side branch as `theirs` (i.e. "one contributor's work on top
 of it").
 
 -b <new_branch>::
-       Create a new branch named <new_branch> and start it at
-       <start_point>; see linkgit:git-branch[1] for details.
+       Create a new branch named `<new_branch>` and start it at
+       `<start_point>`; see linkgit:git-branch[1] for details.
 
 -B <new_branch>::
-       Creates the branch <new_branch> and start it at <start_point>;
-       if it already exists, then reset it to <start_point>. This is
+       Creates the branch `<new_branch>` and start it at `<start_point>`;
+       if it already exists, then reset it to `<start_point>`. This is
        equivalent to running "git branch" with "-f"; see
        linkgit:git-branch[1] for details.
 
@@ -172,15 +164,36 @@ If no `-b` option is given, the name of the new branch will be
 derived from the remote-tracking branch, by looking at the local part of
 the refspec configured for the corresponding remote, and then stripping
 the initial part up to the "*".
-This would tell us to use "hack" as the local branch when branching
-off of "origin/hack" (or "remotes/origin/hack", or even
-"refs/remotes/origin/hack").  If the given name has no slash, or the above
+This would tell us to use `hack` as the local branch when branching
+off of `origin/hack` (or `remotes/origin/hack`, or even
+`refs/remotes/origin/hack`).  If the given name has no slash, or the above
 guessing results in an empty name, the guessing is aborted.  You can
 explicitly give a name with `-b` in such a case.
 
 --no-track::
        Do not set up "upstream" configuration, even if the
-       branch.autoSetupMerge configuration variable is true.
+       `branch.autoSetupMerge` configuration variable is true.
+
+--guess::
+--no-guess::
+       If `<branch>` is not found but there does exist a tracking
+       branch in exactly one remote (call it `<remote>`) with a
+       matching name, treat as equivalent to
++
+------------
+$ git checkout -b <branch> --track <remote>/<branch>
+------------
++
+If the branch exists in multiple remotes and one of them is named by
+the `checkout.defaultRemote` configuration variable, we'll use that
+one for the purposes of disambiguation, even if the `<branch>` isn't
+unique across all remotes. Set it to
+e.g. `checkout.defaultRemote=origin` to always checkout remote
+branches from there if `<branch>` is ambiguous but exists on the
+'origin' remote. See also `checkout.defaultRemote` in
+linkgit:git-config[1].
++
+Use `--no-guess` to disable this.
 
 -l::
        Create the new branch's reflog; see linkgit:git-branch[1] for
@@ -189,21 +202,21 @@ explicitly give a name with `-b` in such a case.
 --detach::
        Rather than checking out a branch to work on it, check out a
        commit for inspection and discardable experiments.
-       This is the default behavior of "git checkout <commit>" when
-       <commit> is not a branch name.  See the "DETACHED HEAD" section
+       This is the default behavior of `git checkout <commit>` when
+       `<commit>` is not a branch name.  See the "DETACHED HEAD" section
        below for details.
 
 --orphan <new_branch>::
-       Create a new 'orphan' branch, named <new_branch>, started from
-       <start_point> and switch to it.  The first commit made on this
+       Create a new 'orphan' branch, named `<new_branch>`, started from
+       `<start_point>` and switch to it.  The first commit made on this
        new branch will have no parents and it will be the root of a new
        history totally disconnected from all the other branches and
        commits.
 +
 The index and the working tree are adjusted as if you had previously run
-"git checkout <start_point>".  This allows you to start a new history
-that records a set of paths similar to <start_point> by easily running
-"git commit -a" to make the root commit.
+`git checkout <start_point>`.  This allows you to start a new history
+that records a set of paths similar to `<start_point>` by easily running
+`git commit -a` to make the root commit.
 +
 This can be useful when you want to publish the tree from a commit
 without exposing its full history. You might want to do this to publish
@@ -212,17 +225,17 @@ whose full history contains proprietary or otherwise encumbered bits of
 code.
 +
 If you want to start a disconnected history that records a set of paths
-that is totally different from the one of <start_point>, then you should
+that is totally different from the one of `<start_point>`, then you should
 clear the index and the working tree right after creating the orphan
-branch by running "git rm -rf ." from the top level of the working tree.
+branch by running `git rm -rf .` from the top level of the working tree.
 Afterwards you will be ready to prepare your new files, repopulating the
 working tree, by copying them from elsewhere, extracting a tarball, etc.
 
 --ignore-skip-worktree-bits::
        In sparse checkout mode, `git checkout -- <paths>` would
-       update only entries matched by <paths> and sparse patterns
-       in $GIT_DIR/info/sparse-checkout. This option ignores
-       the sparse patterns and adds back any files in <paths>.
+       update only entries matched by `<paths>` and sparse patterns
+       in `$GIT_DIR/info/sparse-checkout`. This option ignores
+       the sparse patterns and adds back any files in `<paths>`.
 
 -m::
 --merge::
@@ -246,25 +259,25 @@ the conflicted merge in the specified paths.
 When switching branches with `--merge`, staged changes may be lost.
 
 --conflict=<style>::
-       The same as --merge option above, but changes the way the
+       The same as `--merge` option above, but changes the way the
        conflicting hunks are presented, overriding the
-       merge.conflictStyle configuration variable.  Possible values are
+       `merge.conflictStyle` configuration variable.  Possible values are
        "merge" (default) and "diff3" (in addition to what is shown by
        "merge" style, shows the original contents).
 
 -p::
 --patch::
        Interactively select hunks in the difference between the
-       <tree-ish> (or the index, if unspecified) and the working
+       `<tree-ish>` (or the index, if unspecified) and the working
        tree.  The chosen hunks are then applied in reverse to the
-       working tree (and if a <tree-ish> was specified, the index).
+       working tree (and if a `<tree-ish>` was specified, the index).
 +
 This means that you can use `git checkout -p` to selectively discard
 edits from your current working tree. See the ``Interactive Mode''
 section of linkgit:git-add[1] to learn how to operate the `--patch` mode.
 +
 Note that this option uses the no overlay mode by default (see also
-`--[no-]overlay`), and currently doesn't support overlay mode.
+`--overlay`), and currently doesn't support overlay mode.
 
 --ignore-other-worktrees::
        `git checkout` refuses when the wanted ref is already checked
@@ -272,38 +285,42 @@ Note that this option uses the no overlay mode by default (see also
        out anyway. In other words, the ref can be held by more than one
        worktree.
 
---[no-]recurse-submodules::
-       Using --recurse-submodules will update the content of all initialized
+--overwrite-ignore::
+--no-overwrite-ignore::
+       Silently overwrite ignored files when switching branches. This
+       is the default behavior. Use `--no-overwrite-ignore` to abort
+       the operation when the new branch contains ignored files.
+
+--recurse-submodules::
+--no-recurse-submodules::
+       Using `--recurse-submodules` will update the content of all initialized
        submodules according to the commit recorded in the superproject. If
        local modifications in a submodule would be overwritten the checkout
-       will fail unless `-f` is used. If nothing (or --no-recurse-submodules)
+       will fail unless `-f` is used. If nothing (or `--no-recurse-submodules`)
        is used, the work trees of submodules will not be updated.
-       Just like linkgit:git-submodule[1], this will detach the
-       submodules HEAD.
-
---no-guess::
-       Do not attempt to create a branch if a remote tracking branch
-       of the same name exists.
+       Just like linkgit:git-submodule[1], this will detach `HEAD` of the
+       submodule.
 
---[no-]overlay::
+--overlay::
+--no-overlay::
        In the default overlay mode, `git checkout` never
        removes files from the index or the working tree.  When
        specifying `--no-overlay`, files that appear in the index and
-       working tree, but not in <tree-ish> are removed, to make them
-       match <tree-ish> exactly.
+       working tree, but not in `<tree-ish>` are removed, to make them
+       match `<tree-ish>` exactly.
 
 <branch>::
        Branch to checkout; if it refers to a branch (i.e., a name that,
        when prepended with "refs/heads/", is a valid ref), then that
        branch is checked out. Otherwise, if it refers to a valid
-       commit, your HEAD becomes "detached" and you are no longer on
+       commit, your `HEAD` becomes "detached" and you are no longer on
        any branch (see below for details).
 +
-You can use the `"@{-N}"` syntax to refer to the N-th last
+You can use the `@{-N}` syntax to refer to the N-th last
 branch/commit checked out using "git checkout" operation. You may
-also specify `-` which is synonymous to `"@{-1}"`.
+also specify `-` which is synonymous to `@{-1}`.
 +
-As a special case, you may use `"A...B"` as a shortcut for the
+As a special case, you may use `A...B` as a shortcut for the
 merge base of `A` and `B` if there is exactly one merge base. You can
 leave out at most one of `A` and `B`, in which case it defaults to `HEAD`.
 
@@ -312,7 +329,7 @@ leave out at most one of `A` and `B`, in which case it defaults to `HEAD`.
 
 <start_point>::
        The name of a commit at which to start the new branch; see
-       linkgit:git-branch[1] for details. Defaults to HEAD.
+       linkgit:git-branch[1] for details. Defaults to `HEAD`.
 +
 As a special case, you may use `"A...B"` as a shortcut for the
 merge base of `A` and `B` if there is exactly one merge base. You can
@@ -326,9 +343,9 @@ leave out at most one of `A` and `B`, in which case it defaults to `HEAD`.
 
 DETACHED HEAD
 -------------
-HEAD normally refers to a named branch (e.g. 'master'). Meanwhile, each
+`HEAD` normally refers to a named branch (e.g. `master`). Meanwhile, each
 branch refers to a specific commit. Let's look at a repo with three
-commits, one of them tagged, and with branch 'master' checked out:
+commits, one of them tagged, and with branch `master` checked out:
 
 ------------
            HEAD (refers to branch 'master')
@@ -341,10 +358,10 @@ a---b---c  branch 'master' (refers to commit 'c')
 ------------
 
 When a commit is created in this state, the branch is updated to refer to
-the new commit. Specifically, 'git commit' creates a new commit 'd', whose
-parent is commit 'c', and then updates branch 'master' to refer to new
-commit 'd'. HEAD still refers to branch 'master' and so indirectly now refers
-to commit 'd':
+the new commit. Specifically, 'git commit' creates a new commit `d`, whose
+parent is commit `c`, and then updates branch `master` to refer to new
+commit `d`. `HEAD` still refers to branch `master` and so indirectly now refers
+to commit `d`:
 
 ------------
 $ edit; git add; git commit
@@ -361,7 +378,7 @@ a---b---c---d  branch 'master' (refers to commit 'd')
 It is sometimes useful to be able to checkout a commit that is not at
 the tip of any named branch, or even to create a new commit that is not
 referenced by a named branch. Let's look at what happens when we
-checkout commit 'b' (here we show two ways this may be done):
+checkout commit `b` (here we show two ways this may be done):
 
 ------------
 $ git checkout v2.0  # or
@@ -376,9 +393,9 @@ a---b---c---d  branch 'master' (refers to commit 'd')
   tag 'v2.0' (refers to commit 'b')
 ------------
 
-Notice that regardless of which checkout command we use, HEAD now refers
-directly to commit 'b'. This is known as being in detached HEAD state.
-It means simply that HEAD refers to a specific commit, as opposed to
+Notice that regardless of which checkout command we use, `HEAD` now refers
+directly to commit `b`. This is known as being in detached `HEAD` state.
+It means simply that `HEAD` refers to a specific commit, as opposed to
 referring to a named branch. Let's see what happens when we create a commit:
 
 ------------
@@ -395,7 +412,7 @@ a---b---c---d  branch 'master' (refers to commit 'd')
   tag 'v2.0' (refers to commit 'b')
 ------------
 
-There is now a new commit 'e', but it is referenced only by HEAD. We can
+There is now a new commit `e`, but it is referenced only by `HEAD`. We can
 of course add yet another commit in this state:
 
 ------------
@@ -413,7 +430,7 @@ a---b---c---d  branch 'master' (refers to commit 'd')
 ------------
 
 In fact, we can perform all the normal Git operations. But, let's look
-at what happens when we then checkout master:
+at what happens when we then checkout `master`:
 
 ------------
 $ git checkout master
@@ -428,9 +445,9 @@ a---b---c---d  branch 'master' (refers to commit 'd')
 ------------
 
 It is important to realize that at this point nothing refers to commit
-'f'. Eventually commit 'f' (and by extension commit 'e') will be deleted
+`f`. Eventually commit `f` (and by extension commit `e`) will be deleted
 by the routine Git garbage collection process, unless we create a reference
-before that happens. If we have not yet moved away from commit 'f',
+before that happens. If we have not yet moved away from commit `f`,
 any of these will create a reference to it:
 
 ------------
@@ -439,19 +456,19 @@ $ git branch foo        <2>
 $ git tag foo           <3>
 ------------
 
-<1> creates a new branch 'foo', which refers to commit 'f', and then
-    updates HEAD to refer to branch 'foo'. In other words, we'll no longer
-    be in detached HEAD state after this command.
+<1> creates a new branch `foo`, which refers to commit `f`, and then
+    updates `HEAD` to refer to branch `foo`. In other words, we'll no longer
+    be in detached `HEAD` state after this command.
 
-<2> similarly creates a new branch 'foo', which refers to commit 'f',
-    but leaves HEAD detached.
+<2> similarly creates a new branch `foo`, which refers to commit `f`,
+    but leaves `HEAD` detached.
 
-<3> creates a new tag 'foo', which refers to commit 'f',
-    leaving HEAD detached.
+<3> creates a new tag `foo`, which refers to commit `f`,
+    leaving `HEAD` detached.
 
-If we have moved away from commit 'f', then we must first recover its object
+If we have moved away from commit `f`, then we must first recover its object
 name (typically by using git reflog), and then we can create a reference to
-it. For example, to see the last two commits to which HEAD referred, we
+it. For example, to see the last two commits to which `HEAD` referred, we
 can use either of these commands:
 
 ------------
@@ -462,12 +479,12 @@ $ git log -g -2 HEAD
 ARGUMENT DISAMBIGUATION
 -----------------------
 
-When there is only one argument given and it is not `--` (e.g. "git
-checkout abc"), and when the argument is both a valid `<tree-ish>`
-(e.g. a branch "abc" exists) and a valid `<pathspec>` (e.g. a file
+When there is only one argument given and it is not `--` (e.g. `git
+checkout abc`), and when the argument is both a valid `<tree-ish>`
+(e.g. a branch `abc` exists) and a valid `<pathspec>` (e.g. a file
 or a directory whose name is "abc" exists), Git would usually ask
 you to disambiguate.  Because checking out a branch is so common an
-operation, however, "git checkout abc" takes "abc" as a `<tree-ish>`
+operation, however, `git checkout abc` takes "abc" as a `<tree-ish>`
 in such a situation.  Use `git checkout -- <pathspec>` if you want
 to checkout these paths out of the index.
 
@@ -475,7 +492,7 @@ EXAMPLES
 --------
 
 . The following sequence checks out the `master` branch, reverts
-  the `Makefile` to two revisions back, deletes hello.c by
+  the `Makefile` to two revisions back, deletes `hello.c` by
   mistake, and gets it back from the index.
 +
 ------------
@@ -487,7 +504,7 @@ $ git checkout hello.c            <3>
 +
 <1> switch branch
 <2> take a file out of another commit
-<3> restore hello.c from the index
+<3> restore `hello.c` from the index
 +
 If you want to check out _all_ C source files out of the index,
 you can say
@@ -516,7 +533,7 @@ $ git checkout -- hello.c
 $ git checkout mytopic
 ------------
 +
-However, your "wrong" branch and correct "mytopic" branch may
+However, your "wrong" branch and correct `mytopic` branch may
 differ in files that you have modified locally, in which case
 the above checkout would fail like this:
 +
@@ -557,6 +574,11 @@ $ edit frotz
 $ git add frotz
 ------------
 
+SEE ALSO
+--------
+linkgit:git-switch[1],
+linkgit:git-restore[1]
+
 GIT
 ---
 Part of the linkgit:git[1] suite
index 754b16c..83ce51a 100644 (file)
@@ -10,9 +10,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
 [verse]
 'git cherry-pick' [--edit] [-n] [-m parent-number] [-s] [-x] [--ff]
                  [-S[<keyid>]] <commit>...
-'git cherry-pick' --continue
-'git cherry-pick' --quit
-'git cherry-pick' --abort
+'git cherry-pick' (--continue | --skip | --abort | --quit)
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
index db876f7..0028ff1 100644 (file)
@@ -63,7 +63,7 @@ OPTIONS
        still use the ignore rules given with `-e` options from the command
        line.  This allows removing all untracked
        files, including build products.  This can be used (possibly in
-       conjunction with 'git reset') to create a pristine
+       conjunction with 'git restore' or 'git reset') to create a pristine
        working directory to test a clean build.
 
 -X::
index ca8871c..34011c2 100644 (file)
@@ -15,7 +15,8 @@ SYNOPSIS
          [--dissociate] [--separate-git-dir <git dir>]
          [--depth <depth>] [--[no-]single-branch] [--no-tags]
          [--recurse-submodules[=<pathspec>]] [--[no-]shallow-submodules]
-         [--jobs <n>] [--] <repository> [<directory>]
+         [--[no-]remote-submodules] [--jobs <n>] [--] <repository>
+         [<directory>]
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
@@ -260,6 +261,12 @@ or `--mirror` is given)
 --[no-]shallow-submodules::
        All submodules which are cloned will be shallow with a depth of 1.
 
+--[no-]remote-submodules::
+       All submodules which are cloned will use the status of the submodule’s
+       remote-tracking branch to update the submodule, rather than the
+       superproject’s recorded SHA-1. Equivalent to passing `--remote` to
+       `git submodule update`.
+
 --separate-git-dir=<git dir>::
        Instead of placing the cloned repository where it is supposed
        to be, place the cloned repository at the specified directory,
index 624470e..eb5e786 100644 (file)
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
 --------
 [verse]
 'git commit-graph read' [--object-dir <dir>]
-'git commit-graph verify' [--object-dir <dir>]
+'git commit-graph verify' [--object-dir <dir>] [--shallow]
 'git commit-graph write' <options> [--object-dir <dir>]
 
 
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@ OPTIONS
        Use given directory for the location of packfiles and commit-graph
        file. This parameter exists to specify the location of an alternate
        that only has the objects directory, not a full `.git` directory. The
-       commit-graph file is expected to be at `<dir>/info/commit-graph` and
+       commit-graph file is expected to be in the `<dir>/info` directory and
        the packfiles are expected to be in `<dir>/pack`.
 
 
@@ -51,6 +51,25 @@ or `--stdin-packs`.)
 +
 With the `--append` option, include all commits that are present in the
 existing commit-graph file.
++
+With the `--split` option, write the commit-graph as a chain of multiple
+commit-graph files stored in `<dir>/info/commit-graphs`. The new commits
+not already in the commit-graph are added in a new "tip" file. This file
+is merged with the existing file if the following merge conditions are
+met:
++
+* If `--size-multiple=<X>` is not specified, let `X` equal 2. If the new
+tip file would have `N` commits and the previous tip has `M` commits and
+`X` times `N` is greater than  `M`, instead merge the two files into a
+single file.
++
+* If `--max-commits=<M>` is specified with `M` a positive integer, and the
+new tip file would have more than `M` commits, then instead merge the new
+tip with the previous tip.
++
+Finally, if `--expire-time=<datetime>` is not specified, let `datetime`
+be the current time. After writing the split commit-graph, delete all
+unused commit-graph whose modified times are older than `datetime`.
 
 'read'::
 
@@ -61,6 +80,9 @@ Used for debugging purposes.
 
 Read the commit-graph file and verify its contents against the object
 database. Used to check for corrupted data.
++
+With the `--shallow` option, only check the tip commit-graph file in
+a chain of split commit-graphs.
 
 
 EXAMPLES
index a85c2c2..7628193 100644 (file)
@@ -359,7 +359,7 @@ When recording your own work, the contents of modified files in
 your working tree are temporarily stored to a staging area
 called the "index" with 'git add'.  A file can be
 reverted back, only in the index but not in the working tree,
-to that of the last commit with `git reset HEAD -- <file>`,
+to that of the last commit with `git restore --staged <file>`,
 which effectively reverts 'git add' and prevents the changes to
 this file from participating in the next commit.  After building
 the state to be committed incrementally with these commands,
index f98b7c6..79e22b1 100644 (file)
@@ -232,7 +232,7 @@ write so it might not be enough to grant the users using
 'git-cvsserver' write access to the database file without granting
 them write access to the directory, too.
 
-The database can not be reliably regenerated in a
+The database cannot be reliably regenerated in a
 consistent form after the branch it is tracking has changed.
 Example: For merged branches, 'git-cvsserver' only tracks
 one branch of development, and after a 'git merge' an
index 64c01ba..cc940eb 100644 (file)
@@ -116,7 +116,7 @@ marks the same across runs.
        and will make master{tilde}4 no longer have master{tilde}5 as
        a parent (though both the old master{tilde}4 and new
        master{tilde}4 will have all the same files).  Use
-       --reference-excluded-parents to instead have the the stream
+       --reference-excluded-parents to instead have the stream
        refer to commits in the excluded range of history by their
        sha1sum.  Note that the resulting stream can only be used by a
        repository which already contains the necessary parent
@@ -129,6 +129,13 @@ marks the same across runs.
        for intermediary filters (e.g. for rewriting commit messages
        which refer to older commits, or for stripping blobs by id).
 
+--reencode=(yes|no|abort)::
+       Specify how to handle `encoding` header in commit objects.  When
+       asking to 'abort' (which is the default), this program will die
+       when encountering such a commit object.  With 'yes', the commit
+       message will be reencoded into UTF-8.  With 'no', the original
+       encoding will be preserved.
+
 --refspec::
        Apply the specified refspec to each ref exported. Multiple of them can
        be specified.
index d65cdb3..0bb2762 100644 (file)
@@ -388,9 +388,10 @@ change to the project.
        original-oid?
        ('author' (SP <name>)? SP LT <email> GT SP <when> LF)?
        'committer' (SP <name>)? SP LT <email> GT SP <when> LF
+       ('encoding' SP <encoding>)?
        data
        ('from' SP <commit-ish> LF)?
-       ('merge' SP <commit-ish> LF)?
+       ('merge' SP <commit-ish> LF)*
        (filemodify | filedelete | filecopy | filerename | filedeleteall | notemodify)*
        LF?
 ....
@@ -424,7 +425,7 @@ the same commit, as `filedeleteall` wipes the branch clean (see below).
 
 The `LF` after the command is optional (it used to be required).  Note
 that for reasons of backward compatibility, if the commit ends with a
-`data` command (i.e. it has has no `from`, `merge`, `filemodify`,
+`data` command (i.e. it has no `from`, `merge`, `filemodify`,
 `filedelete`, `filecopy`, `filerename`, `filedeleteall` or
 `notemodify` commands) then two `LF` commands may appear at the end of
 the command instead of just one.
@@ -455,6 +456,12 @@ that was selected by the --date-format=<fmt> command-line option.
 See ``Date Formats'' above for the set of supported formats, and
 their syntax.
 
+`encoding`
+^^^^^^^^^^
+The optional `encoding` command indicates the encoding of the commit
+message.  Most commits are UTF-8 and the encoding is omitted, but this
+allows importing commit messages into git without first reencoding them.
+
 `from`
 ^^^^^^
 The `from` command is used to specify the commit to initialize
index 266d63c..5b1909f 100644 (file)
@@ -262,7 +262,7 @@ This updates (or creates, as necessary) branches `pu` and `tmp` in
 the local repository by fetching from the branches (respectively)
 `pu` and `maint` from the remote repository.
 +
-The `pu` branch will be updated even if it is does not fast-forward,
+The `pu` branch will be updated even if it does not fast-forward,
 because it is prefixed with a plus sign; `tmp` will not be.
 
 * Peek at a remote's branch, without configuring the remote in your local
@@ -285,7 +285,7 @@ BUGS
 ----
 Using --recurse-submodules can only fetch new commits in already checked
 out submodules right now. When e.g. upstream added a new submodule in the
-just fetched commits of the superproject the submodule itself can not be
+just fetched commits of the superproject the submodule itself cannot be
 fetched, making it impossible to check out that submodule later without
 having to do a fetch again. This is expected to be fixed in a future Git
 version.
index 774cecc..6dcd39f 100644 (file)
@@ -214,6 +214,11 @@ symref::
        `:lstrip` and `:rstrip` options in the same way as `refname`
        above.
 
+worktreepath::
+       The absolute path to the worktree in which the ref is checked
+       out, if it is checked out in any linked worktree. Empty string
+       otherwise.
+
 In addition to the above, for commit and tag objects, the header
 field names (`tree`, `parent`, `object`, `type`, and `tag`) can
 be used to specify the value in the header field.
index 1af85d4..b9b97e6 100644 (file)
@@ -22,7 +22,8 @@ SYNOPSIS
                   [--rfc] [--subject-prefix=Subject-Prefix]
                   [(--reroll-count|-v) <n>]
                   [--to=<email>] [--cc=<email>]
-                  [--[no-]cover-letter] [--quiet] [--notes[=<ref>]]
+                  [--[no-]cover-letter] [--quiet]
+                  [--no-notes | --notes[=<ref>]]
                   [--interdiff=<previous>]
                   [--range-diff=<previous> [--creation-factor=<percent>]]
                   [--progress]
@@ -263,6 +264,7 @@ material (this may change in the future).
        for details.
 
 --notes[=<ref>]::
+--no-notes::
        Append the notes (see linkgit:git-notes[1]) for the commit
        after the three-dash line.
 +
@@ -273,6 +275,9 @@ these explanations after `format-patch` has run but before sending,
 keeping them as Git notes allows them to be maintained between versions
 of the patch series (but see the discussion of the `notes.rewrite`
 configuration options in linkgit:git-notes[1] to use this workflow).
++
+The default is `--no-notes`, unless the `format.notes` configuration is
+set.
 
 --[no-]signature=<signature>::
        Add a signature to each message produced. Per RFC 3676 the signature
@@ -421,8 +426,8 @@ One way to test if your MUA is set up correctly is:
 * Apply it:
 
     $ git fetch <project> master:test-apply
-    $ git checkout test-apply
-    $ git reset --hard
+    $ git switch test-apply
+    $ git restore --source=HEAD --staged --worktree :/
     $ git am a.patch
 
 If it does not apply correctly, there can be various reasons.
index b02e922..b406bc4 100644 (file)
@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ OPTIONS
        Print out the ref name given on the command line by which each
        commit was reached.
 
---use-mailmap::
+--[no-]use-mailmap::
        Use mailmap file to map author and committer names and email
        addresses to canonical real names and email addresses. See
        linkgit:git-shortlog[1].
index 9f07f4f..261d5c1 100644 (file)
@@ -149,7 +149,7 @@ instead.
 Discussion on fork-point mode
 -----------------------------
 
-After working on the `topic` branch created with `git checkout -b
+After working on the `topic` branch created with `git switch -c
 topic origin/master`, the history of remote-tracking branch
 `origin/master` may have been rewound and rebuilt, leading to a
 history of this shape:
index 6294dbc..092529c 100644 (file)
@@ -10,11 +10,10 @@ SYNOPSIS
 --------
 [verse]
 'git merge' [-n] [--stat] [--no-commit] [--squash] [--[no-]edit]
-       [-s <strategy>] [-X <strategy-option>] [-S[<keyid>]]
+       [--no-verify] [-s <strategy>] [-X <strategy-option>] [-S[<keyid>]]
        [--[no-]allow-unrelated-histories]
        [--[no-]rerere-autoupdate] [-m <msg>] [-F <file>] [<commit>...]
-'git merge' --abort
-'git merge' --continue
+'git merge' (--continue | --abort | --quit)
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
@@ -88,6 +87,11 @@ will be appended to the specified message.
        Allow the rerere mechanism to update the index with the
        result of auto-conflict resolution if possible.
 
+--overwrite-ignore::
+--no-overwrite-ignore::
+       Silently overwrite ignored files from the merge result. This
+       is the default behavior. Use `--no-overwrite-ignore` to abort.
+
 --abort::
        Abort the current conflict resolution process, and
        try to reconstruct the pre-merge state.
@@ -100,6 +104,10 @@ commit or stash your changes before running 'git merge'.
 'git merge --abort' is equivalent to 'git reset --merge' when
 `MERGE_HEAD` is present.
 
+--quit::
+       Forget about the current merge in progress. Leave the index
+       and the working tree as-is.
+
 --continue::
        After a 'git merge' stops due to conflicts you can conclude the
        merge by running 'git merge --continue' (see "HOW TO RESOLVE
index f7778a2..233b2b7 100644 (file)
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ git-multi-pack-index - Write and verify multi-pack-indexes
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
 [verse]
-'git multi-pack-index' [--object-dir=<dir>] <verb>
+'git multi-pack-index' [--object-dir=<dir>] <subcommand>
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
@@ -23,13 +23,35 @@ OPTIONS
        `<dir>/packs/multi-pack-index` for the current MIDX file, and
        `<dir>/packs` for the pack-files to index.
 
+The following subcommands are available:
+
 write::
-       When given as the verb, write a new MIDX file to
-       `<dir>/packs/multi-pack-index`.
+       Write a new MIDX file.
 
 verify::
-       When given as the verb, verify the contents of the MIDX file
-       at `<dir>/packs/multi-pack-index`.
+       Verify the contents of the MIDX file.
+
+expire::
+       Delete the pack-files that are tracked  by the MIDX file, but
+       have no objects referenced by the MIDX. Rewrite the MIDX file
+       afterward to remove all references to these pack-files.
+
+repack::
+       Create a new pack-file containing objects in small pack-files
+       referenced by the multi-pack-index. If the size given by the
+       `--batch-size=<size>` argument is zero, then create a pack
+       containing all objects referenced by the multi-pack-index. For
+       a non-zero batch size, Select the pack-files by examining packs
+       from oldest-to-newest, computing the "expected size" by counting
+       the number of objects in the pack referenced by the
+       multi-pack-index, then divide by the total number of objects in
+       the pack and multiply by the pack size. We select packs with
+       expected size below the batch size until the set of packs have
+       total expected size at least the batch size. If the total size
+       does not reach the batch size, then do nothing. If a new pack-
+       file is created, rewrite the multi-pack-index to reference the
+       new pack-file. A later run of 'git multi-pack-index expire' will
+       delete the pack-files that were part of this batch.
 
 
 EXAMPLES
index e45f3e6..fecdf26 100644 (file)
@@ -131,7 +131,7 @@ depth is 4095.
 --keep-pack=<pack-name>::
        This flag causes an object already in the given pack to be
        ignored, even if it would have otherwise been
-       packed. `<pack-name>` is the the pack file name without
+       packed. `<pack-name>` is the pack file name without
        leading directory (e.g. `pack-123.pack`). The option could be
        specified multiple times to keep multiple packs.
 
index a5e9501..dfb901f 100644 (file)
@@ -249,7 +249,7 @@ BUGS
 ----
 Using --recurse-submodules can only fetch new commits in already checked
 out submodules right now. When e.g. upstream added a new submodule in the
-just fetched commits of the superproject the submodule itself can not be
+just fetched commits of the superproject the submodule itself cannot be
 fetched, making it impossible to check out that submodule later without
 having to do a fetch again. This is expected to be fixed in a future Git
 version.
index 6a8a0d9..3b80534 100644 (file)
@@ -75,7 +75,7 @@ without any `<refspec>` on the command line.  Otherwise, missing
 +
 If <dst> doesn't start with `refs/` (e.g. `refs/heads/master`) we will
 try to infer where in `refs/*` on the destination <repository> it
-belongs based on the the type of <src> being pushed and whether <dst>
+belongs based on the type of <src> being pushed and whether <dst>
 is ambiguous.
 +
 --
index 5e4e927..3136c19 100644 (file)
@@ -12,12 +12,12 @@ SYNOPSIS
        [<upstream> [<branch>]]
 'git rebase' [-i | --interactive] [<options>] [--exec <cmd>] [--onto <newbase>]
        --root [<branch>]
-'git rebase' --continue | --skip | --abort | --quit | --edit-todo | --show-current-patch
+'git rebase' (--continue | --skip | --abort | --quit | --edit-todo | --show-current-patch)
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
 If <branch> is specified, 'git rebase' will perform an automatic
-`git checkout <branch>` before doing anything else.  Otherwise
+`git switch <branch>` before doing anything else.  Otherwise
 it remains on the current branch.
 
 If <upstream> is not specified, the upstream configured in
@@ -543,8 +543,6 @@ In addition, the following pairs of options are incompatible:
  * --preserve-merges and --interactive
  * --preserve-merges and --signoff
  * --preserve-merges and --rebase-merges
- * --rebase-merges and --strategy
- * --rebase-merges and --strategy-option
 
 BEHAVIORAL DIFFERENCES
 -----------------------
index 0cad37f..9659abb 100644 (file)
@@ -230,7 +230,7 @@ $ git branch -r
   staging/master
   staging/staging-linus
   staging/staging-next
-$ git checkout -b staging staging/master
+$ git switch -c staging staging/master
 ...
 ------------
 
index aa0cc8b..92f146d 100644 (file)
@@ -142,7 +142,7 @@ depth is 4095.
 
 --keep-pack=<pack-name>::
        Exclude the given pack from repacking. This is the equivalent
-       of having `.keep` file on the pack. `<pack-name>` is the the
+       of having `.keep` file on the pack. `<pack-name>` is the
        pack file name without leading directory (e.g. `pack-123.pack`).
        The option could be specified multiple times to keep multiple
        packs.
index 95763d7..4cfc883 100644 (file)
@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@ For such a test, you need to merge master and topic somehow.
 One way to do it is to pull master into the topic branch:
 
 ------------
-       $ git checkout topic
+       $ git switch topic
        $ git merge master
 
               o---*---o---+ topic
@@ -113,10 +113,10 @@ the upstream might have been advanced since the test merge `+`,
 in which case the final commit graph would look like this:
 
 ------------
-       $ git checkout topic
+       $ git switch topic
        $ git merge master
        $ ... work on both topic and master branches
-       $ git checkout master
+       $ git switch master
        $ git merge topic
 
               o---*---o---+---o---o topic
@@ -136,11 +136,11 @@ merges, you could blow away the test merge, and keep building on
 top of the tip before the test merge:
 
 ------------
-       $ git checkout topic
+       $ git switch topic
        $ git merge master
        $ git reset --hard HEAD^ ;# rewind the test merge
        $ ... work on both topic and master branches
-       $ git checkout master
+       $ git switch master
        $ git merge topic
 
               o---*---o-------o---o topic
index 26e746c..97e0544 100644 (file)
@@ -25,12 +25,13 @@ The `<tree-ish>`/`<commit>` defaults to `HEAD` in all forms.
        the current branch.)
 +
 This means that `git reset <paths>` is the opposite of `git add
-<paths>`.
+<paths>`. This command is equivalent to
+`git restore [--source=<tree-ish>] --staged <paths>...`.
 +
 After running `git reset <paths>` to update the index entry, you can
-use linkgit:git-checkout[1] to check the contents out of the index to
-the working tree.
-Alternatively, using linkgit:git-checkout[1] and specifying a commit, you
+use linkgit:git-restore[1] to check the contents out of the index to
+the working tree. Alternatively, using linkgit:git-restore[1]
+and specifying a commit with `--source`, you
 can copy the contents of a path out of a commit to the index and to the
 working tree in one go.
 
@@ -86,8 +87,8 @@ but carries forward unmerged index entries.
        changes, reset is aborted.
 --
 
-If you want to undo a commit other than the latest on a branch,
-linkgit:git-revert[1] is your friend.
+See "Reset, restore and revert" in linkgit:git[1] for the differences
+between the three commands.
 
 
 OPTIONS
@@ -149,9 +150,9 @@ See also the `--amend` option to linkgit:git-commit[1].
 Undo a commit, making it a topic branch::
 +
 ------------
-$ git branch topic/wip     <1>
-$ git reset --hard HEAD~3  <2>
-$ git checkout topic/wip   <3>
+$ git branch topic/wip          <1>
+$ git reset --hard HEAD~3       <2>
+$ git switch topic/wip          <3>
 ------------
 +
 <1> You have made some commits, but realize they were premature
@@ -232,13 +233,13 @@ working tree are not in any shape to be committed yet, but you
 need to get to the other branch for a quick bugfix.
 +
 ------------
-$ git checkout feature ;# you were working in "feature" branch and
-$ work work work       ;# got interrupted
+$ git switch feature  ;# you were working in "feature" branch and
+$ work work work      ;# got interrupted
 $ git commit -a -m "snapshot WIP"                 <1>
-$ git checkout master
+$ git switch master
 $ fix fix fix
 $ git commit ;# commit with real log
-$ git checkout feature
+$ git switch feature
 $ git reset --soft HEAD^ ;# go back to WIP state  <2>
 $ git reset                                       <3>
 ------------
@@ -279,18 +280,18 @@ reset it while keeping the changes in your working tree.
 +
 ------------
 $ git tag start
-$ git checkout -b branch1
+$ git switch -c branch1
 $ edit
 $ git commit ...                            <1>
 $ edit
-$ git checkout -b branch2                   <2>
+$ git switch -c branch2                     <2>
 $ git reset --keep start                    <3>
 ------------
 +
 <1> This commits your first edits in `branch1`.
 <2> In the ideal world, you could have realized that the earlier
     commit did not belong to the new topic when you created and switched
-    to `branch2` (i.e. `git checkout -b branch2 start`), but nobody is
+    to `branch2` (i.e. `git switch -c branch2 start`), but nobody is
     perfect.
 <3> But you can use `reset --keep` to remove the unwanted commit after
     you switched to `branch2`.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-restore.txt b/Documentation/git-restore.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..1ab2e40
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,185 @@
+git-restore(1)
+==============
+
+NAME
+----
+git-restore - Restore working tree files
+
+SYNOPSIS
+--------
+[verse]
+'git restore' [<options>] [--source=<tree>] [--staged] [--worktree] <pathspec>...
+'git restore' (-p|--patch) [<options>] [--source=<tree>] [--staged] [--worktree] [<pathspec>...]
+
+DESCRIPTION
+-----------
+Restore specified paths in the working tree with some contents from a
+restore source. If a path is tracked but does not exist in the restore
+source, it will be removed to match the source.
+
+The command can also be used to restore the content in the index with
+`--staged`, or restore both the working tree and the index with
+`--staged --worktree`.
+
+By default, the restore sources for working tree and the index are the
+index and `HEAD` respectively. `--source` could be used to specify a
+commit as the restore source.
+
+See "Reset, restore and revert" in linkgit:git[1] for the differences
+between the three commands.
+
+THIS COMMAND IS EXPERIMENTAL. THE BEHAVIOR MAY CHANGE.
+
+OPTIONS
+-------
+-s <tree>::
+--source=<tree>::
+       Restore the working tree files with the content from the given
+       tree. It is common to specify the source tree by naming a
+       commit, branch or tag associated with it.
++
+If not specified, the default restore source for the working tree is
+the index, and the default restore source for the index is
+`HEAD`. When both `--staged` and `--worktree` are specified,
+`--source` must also be specified.
+
+-p::
+--patch::
+       Interactively select hunks in the difference between the
+       restore source and the restore location. See the ``Interactive
+       Mode'' section of linkgit:git-add[1] to learn how to operate
+       the `--patch` mode.
++
+Note that `--patch` can accept no pathspec and will prompt to restore
+all modified paths.
+
+-W::
+--worktree::
+-S::
+--staged::
+       Specify the restore location. If neither option is specified,
+       by default the working tree is restored. Specifying `--staged`
+       will only restore the index. Specifying both restores both.
+
+-q::
+--quiet::
+       Quiet, suppress feedback messages. Implies `--no-progress`.
+
+--progress::
+--no-progress::
+       Progress status is reported on the standard error stream
+       by default when it is attached to a terminal, unless `--quiet`
+       is specified. This flag enables progress reporting even if not
+       attached to a terminal, regardless of `--quiet`.
+
+--ours::
+--theirs::
+       When restoring files in the working tree from the index, use
+       stage #2 ('ours') or #3 ('theirs') for unmerged paths.
++
+Note that during `git rebase` and `git pull --rebase`, 'ours' and
+'theirs' may appear swapped. See the explanation of the same options
+in linkgit:git-checkout[1] for details.
+
+-m::
+--merge::
+       When restoring files on the working tree from the index,
+       recreate the conflicted merge in the unmerged paths.
+
+--conflict=<style>::
+       The same as `--merge` option above, but changes the way the
+       conflicting hunks are presented, overriding the
+       `merge.conflictStyle` configuration variable.  Possible values
+       are "merge" (default) and "diff3" (in addition to what is
+       shown by "merge" style, shows the original contents).
+
+--ignore-unmerged::
+       When restoring files on the working tree from the index, do
+       not abort the operation if there are unmerged entries and
+       neither `--ours`, `--theirs`, `--merge` or `--conflict` is
+       specified. Unmerged paths on the working tree are left alone.
+
+--ignore-skip-worktree-bits::
+       In sparse checkout mode, by default is to only update entries
+       matched by `<pathspec>` and sparse patterns in
+       $GIT_DIR/info/sparse-checkout. This option ignores the sparse
+       patterns and unconditionally restores any files in
+       `<pathspec>`.
+
+--overlay::
+--no-overlay::
+       In overlay mode, the command never removes files when
+       restoring. In no-overlay mode, tracked files that do not
+       appear in the `--source` tree are removed, to make them match
+       `<tree>` exactly. The default is no-overlay mode.
+
+EXAMPLES
+--------
+
+The following sequence switches to the `master` branch, reverts the
+`Makefile` to two revisions back, deletes hello.c by mistake, and gets
+it back from the index.
+
+------------
+$ git switch master
+$ git restore --source master~2 Makefile  <1>
+$ rm -f hello.c
+$ git restore hello.c                     <2>
+------------
+
+<1> take a file out of another commit
+<2> restore hello.c from the index
+
+If you want to restore _all_ C source files to match the version in
+the index, you can say
+
+------------
+$ git restore '*.c'
+------------
+
+Note the quotes around `*.c`.  The file `hello.c` will also be
+restored, even though it is no longer in the working tree, because the
+file globbing is used to match entries in the index (not in the
+working tree by the shell).
+
+To restore all files in the current directory
+
+------------
+$ git restore .
+------------
+
+or to restore all working tree files with 'top' pathspec magic (see
+linkgit:gitglossary[7])
+
+------------
+$ git restore :/
+------------
+
+To restore a file in the index to match the version in `HEAD` (this is
+the same as using linkgit:git-reset[1])
+
+------------
+$ git restore --staged hello.c
+------------
+
+or you can restore both the index and the working tree (this the same
+as using linkgit:git-checkout[1])
+
+------------
+$ git restore --source=HEAD --staged --worktree hello.c
+------------
+
+or the short form which is more practical but less readable:
+
+------------
+$ git restore -s@ -SW hello.c
+------------
+
+SEE ALSO
+--------
+linkgit:git-checkout[1],
+linkgit:git-reset[1]
+
+GIT
+---
+Part of the linkgit:git[1] suite
index 88609ff..9392760 100644 (file)
@@ -48,6 +48,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
             [ --date=<format>]
             [ [ --objects | --objects-edge | --objects-edge-aggressive ]
               [ --unpacked ]
+              [ --object-names | --no-object-names ]
               [ --filter=<filter-spec> [ --filter-print-omitted ] ] ]
             [ --missing=<missing-action> ]
             [ --pretty | --header ]
index 0c82ca5..9d22270 100644 (file)
@@ -9,9 +9,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
 --------
 [verse]
 'git revert' [--[no-]edit] [-n] [-m parent-number] [-s] [-S[<keyid>]] <commit>...
-'git revert' --continue
-'git revert' --quit
-'git revert' --abort
+'git revert' (--continue | --skip | --abort | --quit)
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
@@ -26,10 +24,13 @@ effect of some earlier commits (often only a faulty one).  If you want to
 throw away all uncommitted changes in your working directory, you
 should see linkgit:git-reset[1], particularly the `--hard` option.  If
 you want to extract specific files as they were in another commit, you
-should see linkgit:git-checkout[1], specifically the `git checkout
-<commit> -- <filename>` syntax.  Take care with these alternatives as
+should see linkgit:git-restore[1], specifically the `--source`
+option. Take care with these alternatives as
 both will discard uncommitted changes in your working directory.
 
+See "Reset, restore and revert" in linkgit:git[1] for the differences
+between the three commands.
+
 OPTIONS
 -------
 <commit>...::
index 504ae7f..d93e5d0 100644 (file)
@@ -278,6 +278,14 @@ must be used for each option.
 Automating
 ~~~~~~~~~~
 
+--no-[to|cc|bcc]::
+       Clears any list of "To:", "Cc:", "Bcc:" addresses previously
+       set via config.
+
+--no-identity::
+       Clears the previously read value of `sendemail.identity` set
+       via config, if any.
+
 --to-cmd=<command>::
        Specify a command to execute once per patch file which
        should generate patch file specific "To:" entries.
index e31ea7d..8fbe12c 100644 (file)
@@ -235,12 +235,12 @@ return to your original branch to make the emergency fix, like this:
 +
 ----------------------------------------------------------------
 # ... hack hack hack ...
-$ git checkout -b my_wip
+$ git switch -c my_wip
 $ git commit -a -m "WIP"
-$ git checkout master
+$ git switch master
 $ edit emergency fix
 $ git commit -a -m "Fix in a hurry"
-$ git checkout my_wip
+$ git switch my_wip
 $ git reset --soft HEAD^
 # ... continue hacking ...
 ----------------------------------------------------------------
@@ -293,7 +293,8 @@ SEE ALSO
 linkgit:git-checkout[1],
 linkgit:git-commit[1],
 linkgit:git-reflog[1],
-linkgit:git-reset[1]
+linkgit:git-reset[1],
+linkgit:git-switch[1]
 
 GIT
 ---
diff --git a/Documentation/git-switch.txt b/Documentation/git-switch.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..1979003
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,273 @@
+git-switch(1)
+=============
+
+NAME
+----
+git-switch - Switch branches
+
+SYNOPSIS
+--------
+[verse]
+'git switch' [<options>] [--no-guess] <branch>
+'git switch' [<options>] --detach [<start-point>]
+'git switch' [<options>] (-c|-C) <new-branch> [<start-point>]
+'git switch' [<options>] --orphan <new-branch>
+
+DESCRIPTION
+-----------
+Switch to a specified branch. The working tree and the index are
+updated to match the branch. All new commits will be added to the tip
+of this branch.
+
+Optionally a new branch could be created with either `-c`, `-C`,
+automatically from a remote branch of same name (see `--guess`), or
+detach the working tree from any branch with `--detach`, along with
+switching.
+
+Switching branches does not require a clean index and working tree
+(i.e. no differences compared to `HEAD`). The operation is aborted
+however if the operation leads to loss of local changes, unless told
+otherwise with `--discard-changes` or `--merge`.
+
+THIS COMMAND IS EXPERIMENTAL. THE BEHAVIOR MAY CHANGE.
+
+OPTIONS
+-------
+<branch>::
+       Branch to switch to.
+
+<new-branch>::
+       Name for the new branch.
+
+<start-point>::
+       The starting point for the new branch. Specifying a
+       `<start-point>` allows you to create a branch based on some
+       other point in history than where HEAD currently points. (Or,
+       in the case of `--detach`, allows you to inspect and detach
+       from some other point.)
++
+You can use the `@{-N}` syntax to refer to the N-th last
+branch/commit switched to using "git switch" or "git checkout"
+operation. You may also specify `-` which is synonymous to `@{-1}`.
+This is often used to switch quickly between two branches, or to undo
+a branch switch by mistake.
++
+As a special case, you may use `A...B` as a shortcut for the merge
+base of `A` and `B` if there is exactly one merge base. You can leave
+out at most one of `A` and `B`, in which case it defaults to `HEAD`.
+
+-c <new-branch>::
+--create <new-branch>::
+       Create a new branch named `<new-branch>` starting at
+       `<start-point>` before switching to the branch. This is a
+       convenient shortcut for:
++
+------------
+$ git branch <new-branch>
+$ git switch <new-branch>
+------------
+
+-C <new-branch>::
+--force-create <new-branch>::
+       Similar to `--create` except that if `<new-branch>` already
+       exists, it will be reset to `<start-point>`. This is a
+       convenient shortcut for:
++
+------------
+$ git branch -f <new-branch>
+$ git switch <new-branch>
+------------
+
+-d::
+--detach::
+       Switch to a commit for inspection and discardable
+       experiments. See the "DETACHED HEAD" section in
+       linkgit:git-checkout[1] for details.
+
+--guess::
+--no-guess::
+       If `<branch>` is not found but there does exist a tracking
+       branch in exactly one remote (call it `<remote>`) with a
+       matching name, treat as equivalent to
++
+------------
+$ git switch -c <branch> --track <remote>/<branch>
+------------
++
+If the branch exists in multiple remotes and one of them is named by
+the `checkout.defaultRemote` configuration variable, we'll use that
+one for the purposes of disambiguation, even if the `<branch>` isn't
+unique across all remotes. Set it to e.g. `checkout.defaultRemote=origin`
+to always checkout remote branches from there if `<branch>` is
+ambiguous but exists on the 'origin' remote. See also
+`checkout.defaultRemote` in linkgit:git-config[1].
++
+`--guess` is the default behavior. Use `--no-guess` to disable it.
+
+-f::
+--force::
+       An alias for `--discard-changes`.
+
+--discard-changes::
+       Proceed even if the index or the working tree differs from
+       `HEAD`. Both the index and working tree are restored to match
+       the switching target. If `--recurse-submodules` is specified,
+       submodule content is also restored to match the switching
+       target. This is used to throw away local changes.
+
+-m::
+--merge::
+       If you have local modifications to one or more files that are
+       different between the current branch and the branch to which
+       you are switching, the command refuses to switch branches in
+       order to preserve your modifications in context.  However,
+       with this option, a three-way merge between the current
+       branch, your working tree contents, and the new branch is
+       done, and you will be on the new branch.
++
+When a merge conflict happens, the index entries for conflicting
+paths are left unmerged, and you need to resolve the conflicts
+and mark the resolved paths with `git add` (or `git rm` if the merge
+should result in deletion of the path).
+
+--conflict=<style>::
+       The same as `--merge` option above, but changes the way the
+       conflicting hunks are presented, overriding the
+       `merge.conflictStyle` configuration variable.  Possible values are
+       "merge" (default) and "diff3" (in addition to what is shown by
+       "merge" style, shows the original contents).
+
+-q::
+--quiet::
+       Quiet, suppress feedback messages.
+
+--progress::
+--no-progress::
+       Progress status is reported on the standard error stream
+       by default when it is attached to a terminal, unless `--quiet`
+       is specified. This flag enables progress reporting even if not
+       attached to a terminal, regardless of `--quiet`.
+
+-t::
+--track::
+       When creating a new branch, set up "upstream" configuration.
+       `-c` is implied. See `--track` in linkgit:git-branch[1] for
+       details.
++
+If no `-c` option is given, the name of the new branch will be derived
+from the remote-tracking branch, by looking at the local part of the
+refspec configured for the corresponding remote, and then stripping
+the initial part up to the "*".  This would tell us to use `hack` as
+the local branch when branching off of `origin/hack` (or
+`remotes/origin/hack`, or even `refs/remotes/origin/hack`).  If the
+given name has no slash, or the above guessing results in an empty
+name, the guessing is aborted.  You can explicitly give a name with
+`-c` in such a case.
+
+--no-track::
+       Do not set up "upstream" configuration, even if the
+       `branch.autoSetupMerge` configuration variable is true.
+
+--orphan <new-branch>::
+       Create a new 'orphan' branch, named `<new-branch>`. All
+       tracked files are removed.
+
+--ignore-other-worktrees::
+       `git switch` refuses when the wanted ref is already
+       checked out by another worktree. This option makes it check
+       the ref out anyway. In other words, the ref can be held by
+       more than one worktree.
+
+--recurse-submodules::
+--no-recurse-submodules::
+       Using `--recurse-submodules` will update the content of all
+       initialized submodules according to the commit recorded in the
+       superproject. If nothing (or `--no-recurse-submodules`) is
+       used, the work trees of submodules will not be updated. Just
+       like linkgit:git-submodule[1], this will detach `HEAD` of the
+       submodules.
+
+EXAMPLES
+--------
+
+The following command switches to the "master" branch:
+
+------------
+$ git switch master
+------------
+
+After working in the wrong branch, switching to the correct branch
+would be done using:
+
+------------
+$ git switch mytopic
+------------
+
+However, your "wrong" branch and correct "mytopic" branch may differ
+in files that you have modified locally, in which case the above
+switch would fail like this:
+
+------------
+$ git switch mytopic
+error: You have local changes to 'frotz'; not switching branches.
+------------
+
+You can give the `-m` flag to the command, which would try a three-way
+merge:
+
+------------
+$ git switch -m mytopic
+Auto-merging frotz
+------------
+
+After this three-way merge, the local modifications are _not_
+registered in your index file, so `git diff` would show you what
+changes you made since the tip of the new branch.
+
+To switch back to the previous branch before we switched to mytopic
+(i.e. "master" branch):
+
+------------
+$ git switch -
+------------
+
+You can grow a new branch from any commit. For example, switch to
+"HEAD~3" and create branch "fixup":
+
+------------
+$ git switch -c fixup HEAD~3
+Switched to a new branch 'fixup'
+------------
+
+If you want to start a new branch from a remote branch of the same
+name:
+
+------------
+$ git switch new-topic
+Branch 'new-topic' set up to track remote branch 'new-topic' from 'origin'
+Switched to a new branch 'new-topic'
+------------
+
+To check out commit `HEAD~3` for temporary inspection or experiment
+without creating a new branch:
+
+------------
+$ git switch --detach HEAD~3
+HEAD is now at 9fc9555312 Merge branch 'cc/shared-index-permbits'
+------------
+
+If it turns out whatever you have done is worth keeping, you can
+always create a new name for it (without switching away):
+
+------------
+$ git switch -c good-surprises
+------------
+
+SEE ALSO
+--------
+linkgit:git-checkout[1],
+linkgit:git-branch[1]
+
+GIT
+---
+Part of the linkgit:git[1] suite
index a74e7b9..2e5599a 100644 (file)
@@ -64,6 +64,13 @@ OPTIONS
 -s::
 --sign::
        Make a GPG-signed tag, using the default e-mail address's key.
+       The default behavior of tag GPG-signing is controlled by `tag.gpgSign`
+       configuration variable if it exists, or disabled oder otherwise.
+       See linkgit:git-config[1].
+
+--no-sign::
+       Override `tag.gpgSign` configuration variable that is
+       set to force each and every tag to be signed.
 
 -u <keyid>::
 --local-user=<keyid>::
index bd0e364..969bb2e 100644 (file)
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ git-update-server-info - Update auxiliary info file to help dumb servers
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
 [verse]
-'git update-server-info' [--force]
+'git update-server-info'
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
@@ -19,15 +19,6 @@ $GIT_OBJECT_DIRECTORY/info directories to help clients discover
 what references and packs the server has.  This command
 generates such auxiliary files.
 
-
-OPTIONS
--------
-
--f::
---force::
-       Update the info files from scratch.
-
-
 OUTPUT
 ------
 
index 81f7ecd..9b82564 100644 (file)
@@ -33,7 +33,8 @@ individual Git commands with "git help command".  linkgit:gitcli[7]
 manual page gives you an overview of the command-line command syntax.
 
 A formatted and hyperlinked copy of the latest Git documentation
-can be viewed at `https://git.github.io/htmldocs/git.html`.
+can be viewed at https://git.github.io/htmldocs/git.html
+or https://git-scm.com/docs.
 
 
 OPTIONS
@@ -211,6 +212,26 @@ people via patch over e-mail.
 
 include::cmds-foreignscminterface.txt[]
 
+Reset, restore and revert
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+There are three commands with similar names: `git reset`,
+`git restore` and `git revert`.
+
+* linkgit:git-revert[1] is about making a new commit that reverts the
+  changes made by other commits.
+
+* linkgit:git-restore[1] is about restoring files in the working tree
+  from either the index or another commit. This command does not
+  update your branch. The command can also be used to restore files in
+  the index from another commit.
+
+* linkgit:git-reset[1] is about updating your branch, moving the tip
+  in order to add or remove commits from the branch. This operation
+  changes the commit history.
++
+`git reset` can also be used to restore the index, overlapping with
+`git restore`.
+
 
 Low-level commands (plumbing)
 -----------------------------
index 4fb20cd..c5a528c 100644 (file)
@@ -112,7 +112,8 @@ Checking-out and checking-in
 
 These attributes affect how the contents stored in the
 repository are copied to the working tree files when commands
-such as 'git checkout' and 'git merge' run.  They also affect how
+such as 'git switch', 'git checkout'  and 'git merge' run.
+They also affect how
 Git stores the contents you prepare in the working tree in the
 repository upon 'git add' and 'git commit'.
 
@@ -809,6 +810,8 @@ patterns are available:
 
 - `css` suitable for cascading style sheets.
 
+- `dts` suitable for devicetree (DTS) files.
+
 - `fortran` suitable for source code in the Fortran language.
 
 - `fountain` suitable for Fountain documents.
@@ -819,7 +822,7 @@ patterns are available:
 
 - `java` suitable for source code in the Java language.
 
-- `matlab` suitable for source code in the MATLAB language.
+- `matlab` suitable for source code in the MATLAB and Octave languages.
 
 - `objc` suitable for source code in the Objective-C language.
 
@@ -833,6 +836,8 @@ patterns are available:
 
 - `ruby` suitable for source code in the Ruby language.
 
+- `rust` suitable for source code in the Rust language.
+
 - `tex` suitable for source code for LaTeX documents.
 
 
index 592e06d..4b32876 100644 (file)
@@ -37,6 +37,12 @@ arguments.  Here are the rules:
    file called HEAD in your work tree, `git diff HEAD` is ambiguous, and
    you have to say either `git diff HEAD --` or `git diff -- HEAD` to
    disambiguate.
+
+ * Because `--` disambiguates revisions and paths in some commands, it
+   cannot be used for those commands to separate options and revisions.
+   You can use `--end-of-options` for this (it also works for commands
+   that do not distinguish between revisions in paths, in which case it
+   is simply an alias for `--`).
 +
 When writing a script that is expected to handle random user-input, it is
 a good practice to make it explicit which arguments are which by placing
@@ -47,8 +53,8 @@ disambiguating `--` at appropriate places.
    things:
 +
 --------------------------------
-$ git checkout -- *.c
-$ git checkout -- \*.c
+$ git restore *.c
+$ git restore \*.c
 --------------------------------
 +
 The former lets your shell expand the fileglob, and you are asking
@@ -209,6 +215,18 @@ See also http://marc.info/?l=git&m=116563135620359 and
 http://marc.info/?l=git&m=119150393620273 for further
 information.
 
+Some other commands that also work on files in the working tree and/or
+in the index can take `--staged` and/or `--worktree`.
+
+* `--staged` is exactly like `--cached`, which is used to ask a
+  command to only work on the index, not the working tree.
+
+* `--worktree` is the opposite, to ask a command to work on the
+  working tree only, not the index.
+
+* The two options can be specified together to ask a command to work
+  on both the index and the working tree.
+
 GIT
 ---
 Part of the linkgit:git[1] suite
index e29a9ef..f880d21 100644 (file)
@@ -741,7 +741,7 @@ used earlier, and create a branch in it. You do that by simply just
 saying that you want to check out a new branch:
 
 ------------
-$ git checkout -b mybranch
+$ git switch -c mybranch
 ------------
 
 will create a new branch based at the current `HEAD` position, and switch
@@ -755,7 +755,7 @@ just telling 'git checkout' what the base of the checkout would be.
 In other words, if you have an earlier tag or branch, you'd just do
 
 ------------
-$ git checkout -b mybranch earlier-commit
+$ git switch -c mybranch earlier-commit
 ------------
 
 and it would create the new branch `mybranch` at the earlier commit,
@@ -765,7 +765,7 @@ and check out the state at that time.
 You can always just jump back to your original `master` branch by doing
 
 ------------
-$ git checkout master
+$ git switch master
 ------------
 
 (or any other branch-name, for that matter) and if you forget which
@@ -794,7 +794,7 @@ $ git branch <branchname> [startingpoint]
 
 which will simply _create_ the branch, but will not do anything further.
 You can then later -- once you decide that you want to actually develop
-on that branch -- switch to that branch with a regular 'git checkout'
+on that branch -- switch to that branch with a regular 'git switch'
 with the branchname as the argument.
 
 
@@ -808,7 +808,7 @@ being the same as the original `master` branch, let's make sure we're in
 that branch, and do some work there.
 
 ------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout mybranch
+$ git switch mybranch
 $ echo "Work, work, work" >>hello
 $ git commit -m "Some work." -i hello
 ------------------------------------------------
@@ -825,7 +825,7 @@ does some work in the original branch, and simulate that by going back
 to the master branch, and editing the same file differently there:
 
 ------------
-$ git checkout master
+$ git switch master
 ------------
 
 Here, take a moment to look at the contents of `hello`, and notice how they
@@ -958,7 +958,7 @@ to the `master` branch. Let's go back to `mybranch`, and run
 'git merge' to get the "upstream changes" back to your branch.
 
 ------------
-$ git checkout mybranch
+$ git switch mybranch
 $ git merge -m "Merge upstream changes." master
 ------------
 
@@ -1133,9 +1133,8 @@ Remember, before running 'git merge', our `master` head was at
 work." commit.
 
 ------------
-$ git checkout mybranch
-$ git reset --hard master^2
-$ git checkout master
+$ git switch -C mybranch master^2
+$ git switch master
 $ git reset --hard master^
 ------------
 
index 9f2528f..1bd919f 100644 (file)
@@ -41,7 +41,7 @@ following commands.
 
   * linkgit:git-log[1] to see what happened.
 
-  * linkgit:git-checkout[1] and linkgit:git-branch[1] to switch
+  * linkgit:git-switch[1] and linkgit:git-branch[1] to switch
     branches.
 
   * linkgit:git-add[1] to manage the index file.
@@ -51,8 +51,7 @@ following commands.
 
   * linkgit:git-commit[1] to advance the current branch.
 
-  * linkgit:git-reset[1] and linkgit:git-checkout[1] (with
-    pathname parameters) to undo changes.
+  * linkgit:git-restore[1] to undo changes.
 
   * linkgit:git-merge[1] to merge between local branches.
 
@@ -80,9 +79,9 @@ $ git tag v2.43 <2>
 Create a topic branch and develop.::
 +
 ------------
-$ git checkout -b alsa-audio <1>
+$ git switch -c alsa-audio <1>
 $ edit/compile/test
-$ git checkout -- curses/ux_audio_oss.c <2>
+$ git restore curses/ux_audio_oss.c <2>
 $ git add curses/ux_audio_alsa.c <3>
 $ edit/compile/test
 $ git diff HEAD <4>
@@ -90,7 +89,7 @@ $ git commit -a -s <5>
 $ edit/compile/test
 $ git diff HEAD^ <6>
 $ git commit -a --amend <7>
-$ git checkout master <8>
+$ git switch master <8>
 $ git merge alsa-audio <9>
 $ git log --since='3 days ago' <10>
 $ git log v2.43.. curses/ <11>
@@ -148,11 +147,11 @@ Clone the upstream and work on it.  Feed changes to upstream.::
 ------------
 $ git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/.../torvalds/linux-2.6 my2.6
 $ cd my2.6
-$ git checkout -b mine master <1>
+$ git switch -c mine master <1>
 $ edit/compile/test; git commit -a -s <2>
 $ git format-patch master <3>
 $ git send-email --to="person <email@example.com>" 00*.patch <4>
-$ git checkout master <5>
+$ git switch master <5>
 $ git pull <6>
 $ git log -p ORIG_HEAD.. arch/i386 include/asm-i386 <7>
 $ git ls-remote --heads http://git.kernel.org/.../jgarzik/libata-dev.git <8>
@@ -194,7 +193,7 @@ satellite$ edit/compile/test/commit
 satellite$ git push origin <4>
 
 mothership$ cd frotz
-mothership$ git checkout master
+mothership$ git switch master
 mothership$ git merge satellite/master <5>
 ------------
 +
@@ -216,7 +215,7 @@ machine into the master branch.
 Branch off of a specific tag.::
 +
 ------------
-$ git checkout -b private2.6.14 v2.6.14 <1>
+$ git switch -c private2.6.14 v2.6.14 <1>
 $ edit/compile/test; git commit -a
 $ git checkout master
 $ git cherry-pick v2.6.14..private2.6.14 <2>
@@ -274,14 +273,14 @@ $ mailx <3>
 & s 2 3 4 5 ./+to-apply
 & s 7 8 ./+hold-linus
 & q
-$ git checkout -b topic/one master
+$ git switch -c topic/one master
 $ git am -3 -i -s ./+to-apply <4>
 $ compile/test
-$ git checkout -b hold/linus && git am -3 -i -s ./+hold-linus <5>
-$ git checkout topic/one && git rebase master <6>
-$ git checkout pu && git reset --hard next <7>
+$ git switch -c hold/linus && git am -3 -i -s ./+hold-linus <5>
+$ git switch topic/one && git rebase master <6>
+$ git switch -C pu next <7>
 $ git merge topic/one topic/two && git merge hold/linus <8>
-$ git checkout maint
+$ git switch maint
 $ git cherry-pick master~4 <9>
 $ compile/test
 $ git tag -s -m "GIT 0.99.9x" v0.99.9x <10>
index 786e778..57d6e2b 100644 (file)
@@ -103,6 +103,28 @@ The default 'pre-commit' hook, when enabled--and with the
 `hooks.allownonascii` config option unset or set to false--prevents
 the use of non-ASCII filenames.
 
+pre-merge-commit
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+This hook is invoked by linkgit:git-merge[1], and can be bypassed
+with the `--no-verify` option.  It takes no parameters, and is
+invoked after the merge has been carried out successfully and before
+obtaining the proposed commit log message to
+make a commit.  Exiting with a non-zero status from this script
+causes the `git merge` command to abort before creating a commit.
+
+The default 'pre-merge-commit' hook, when enabled, runs the
+'pre-commit' hook, if the latter is enabled.
+
+This hook is invoked with the environment variable
+`GIT_EDITOR=:` if the command will not bring up an editor
+to modify the commit message.
+
+If the merge cannot be carried out automatically, the conflicts
+need to be resolved and the result committed separately (see
+linkgit:git-merge[1]). At that point, this hook will not be executed,
+but the 'pre-commit' hook will, if it is enabled.
+
 prepare-commit-msg
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
@@ -165,12 +187,13 @@ rebased, and is not set when rebasing the current branch.
 post-checkout
 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
-This hook is invoked when a linkgit:git-checkout[1] is run after having updated the
+This hook is invoked when a linkgit:git-checkout[1] or
+linkgit:git-switch[1] is run after having updated the
 worktree.  The hook is given three parameters: the ref of the previous HEAD,
 the ref of the new HEAD (which may or may not have changed), and a flag
 indicating whether the checkout was a branch checkout (changing branches,
 flag=1) or a file checkout (retrieving a file from the index, flag=0).
-This hook cannot affect the outcome of `git checkout`.
+This hook cannot affect the outcome of `git switch` or `git checkout`.
 
 It is also run after linkgit:git-clone[1], unless the `--no-checkout` (`-n`) option is
 used. The first parameter given to the hook is the null-ref, the second the
@@ -406,7 +429,8 @@ exit with a zero status.
 For example, the hook can simply run `git read-tree -u -m HEAD "$1"`
 in order to emulate `git fetch` that is run in the reverse direction
 with `git push`, as the two-tree form of `git read-tree -u -m` is
-essentially the same as `git checkout` that switches branches while
+essentially the same as `git switch` or `git checkout`
+that switches branches while
 keeping the local changes in the working tree that do not interfere
 with the difference between the branches.
 
index 216b11e..d6388f1 100644 (file)
@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ objects/[0-9a-f][0-9a-f]::
        here are often called 'unpacked' (or 'loose') objects.
 
 objects/pack::
-       Packs (files that store many object in compressed form,
+       Packs (files that store many objects in compressed form,
        along with index files to allow them to be randomly
        accessed) are found in this directory.
 
index e0976f6..8bdb7d0 100644 (file)
@@ -370,13 +370,13 @@ situation:
 $ git status
 On branch master
 Changes to be committed:
-  (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
+  (use "git restore --staged <file>..." to unstage)
 
        new file:   closing.txt
 
 Changes not staged for commit:
   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
-  (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
+  (use "git restore <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
 
        modified:   file.txt
 
index 242de31..59ef5ce 100644 (file)
@@ -110,7 +110,7 @@ $ git status
 On branch master
 Changes to be committed:
 Your branch is up to date with 'origin/master'.
-  (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
+  (use "git restore --staged <file>..." to unstage)
 
        modified:   file1
        modified:   file2
@@ -207,7 +207,7 @@ automatically.  The asterisk marks the branch you are currently on;
 type
 
 ------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout experimental
+$ git switch experimental
 ------------------------------------------------
 
 to switch to the experimental branch.  Now edit a file, commit the
@@ -216,7 +216,7 @@ change, and switch back to the master branch:
 ------------------------------------------------
 (edit file)
 $ git commit -a
-$ git checkout master
+$ git switch master
 ------------------------------------------------
 
 Check that the change you made is no longer visible, since it was
index ca11c7b..abc0dc6 100644 (file)
@@ -301,8 +301,7 @@ topics on 'next':
 .Rewind and rebuild next
 [caption="Recipe: "]
 =====================================
-* `git checkout next`
-* `git reset --hard master`
+* `git switch -C next master`
 * `git merge ai/topic_in_next1`
 * `git merge ai/topic_in_next2`
 * ...
index 8d38ae6..090c888 100644 (file)
@@ -255,7 +255,7 @@ This commit is referred to as a "merge commit", or sometimes just a
 [[def_object]]object::
        The unit of storage in Git. It is uniquely identified by the
        <<def_SHA1,SHA-1>> of its contents. Consequently, an
-       object can not be changed.
+       object cannot be changed.
 
 [[def_object_database]]object database::
        Stores a set of "objects", and an individual <<def_object,object>> is
index 79a00d2..d6a9f4b 100644 (file)
@@ -105,6 +105,10 @@ option can be used to override --squash.
 +
 With --squash, --commit is not allowed, and will fail.
 
+--no-verify::
+       This option bypasses the pre-merge and commit-msg hooks.
+       See also linkgit:githooks[5].
+
 -s <strategy>::
 --strategy=<strategy>::
        Use the given merge strategy; can be supplied more than
index 71a1fcc..90ff9e2 100644 (file)
@@ -182,6 +182,14 @@ explicitly.
        Pretend as if all objects mentioned by reflogs are listed on the
        command line as `<commit>`.
 
+--alternate-refs::
+       Pretend as if all objects mentioned as ref tips of alternate
+       repositories were listed on the command line. An alternate
+       repository is any repository whose object directory is specified
+       in `objects/info/alternates`.  The set of included objects may
+       be modified by `core.alternateRefsCommand`, etc. See
+       linkgit:git-config[1].
+
 --single-worktree::
        By default, all working trees will be examined by the
        following options when there are more than one (see
@@ -708,6 +716,16 @@ ifdef::git-rev-list[]
        Only useful with `--objects`; print the object IDs that are not
        in packs.
 
+--object-names::
+       Only useful with `--objects`; print the names of the object IDs
+       that are found. This is the default behavior.
+
+--no-object-names::
+       Only useful with `--objects`; does not print the names of the object
+       IDs that are found. This inverts `--object-names`. This flag allows
+       the output to be more easily parsed by commands such as
+       linkgit:git-cat-file[1].
+
 --filter=<filter-spec>::
        Only useful with one of the `--objects*`; omits objects (usually
        blobs) from the list of printed objects.  The '<filter-spec>'
@@ -738,6 +756,22 @@ explicitly-given commit or tree.
 Note that the form '--filter=sparse:path=<path>' that wants to read
 from an arbitrary path on the filesystem has been dropped for security
 reasons.
++
+Multiple '--filter=' flags can be specified to combine filters. Only
+objects which are accepted by every filter are included.
++
+The form '--filter=combine:<filter1>+<filter2>+...<filterN>' can also be
+used to combined several filters, but this is harder than just repeating
+the '--filter' flag and is usually not necessary. Filters are joined by
+'{plus}' and individual filters are %-encoded (i.e. URL-encoded).
+Besides the '{plus}' and '%' characters, the following characters are
+reserved and also must be encoded: `~!@#$^&*()[]{}\;",<>?`+&#39;&#96;+
+as well as all characters with ASCII code &lt;= `0x20`, which includes
+space and newline.
++
+Other arbitrary characters can also be encoded. For instance,
+'combine:tree:3+blob:none' and 'combine:tree%3A3+blob%3Anone' are
+equivalent.
 
 --no-filter::
        Turn off any previous `--filter=` argument.
index 82c1e57..97f995e 100644 (file)
@@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ Here's an example to make it more clear:
 ------------------------------
 $ git config push.default current
 $ git config remote.pushdefault myfork
-$ git checkout -b mybranch origin/master
+$ git switch -c mybranch origin/master
 
 $ git rev-parse --symbolic-full-name @{upstream}
 refs/remotes/origin/master
index 5a57c4a..3bceb56 100644 (file)
@@ -3,6 +3,10 @@
        `.git/sequencer`.  Can be used to continue after resolving
        conflicts in a failed cherry-pick or revert.
 
+--skip::
+       Skip the current commit and continue with the rest of the
+       sequence.
+
 --quit::
        Forget about the current operation in progress.  Can be used
        to clear the sequencer state after a failed cherry-pick or
index 46c3d5c..ad9d019 100644 (file)
@@ -54,7 +54,7 @@ this:
 do not do this you will get an error for each ref that it does not point
 to a valid object.
 
-Note: As a side-effect of this you can not safely assume that all
+Note: As a side-effect of this you cannot safely assume that all
 objects you lookup are available in superproject. All submodule objects
 will be available the same way as the superprojects objects.
 
index fd1e628..71eb081 100644 (file)
@@ -35,7 +35,7 @@ Format details are given in a later section.
 === The Normal Format Target
 
 The normal format target is a tradition printf format and similar
-to GIT_TRACE format.  This format is enabled with the `GIT_TR`
+to GIT_TRACE format.  This format is enabled with the `GIT_TRACE2`
 environment variable or the `trace2.normalTarget` system or global
 config setting.
 
index bde1862..7962e32 100644 (file)
@@ -62,9 +62,7 @@ Initializing
 `setup_traverse_info`::
 
        Initialize a `traverse_info` given the pathname of the tree to start
-       traversing from. The `base` argument is assumed to be the `path`
-       member of the `name_entry` being recursed into unless the tree is a
-       top-level tree in which case the empty string ("") is used.
+       traversing from.
 
 Walking
 -------
@@ -140,6 +138,10 @@ same in the next callback invocation.
        This utilizes the memory structure of a tree entry to avoid the
        overhead of using a generic strlen().
 
+`strbuf_make_traverse_path`::
+
+       Convenience wrapper to `make_traverse_path` into a strbuf.
+
 Authors
 -------
 
index 16452a0..a4f1744 100644 (file)
@@ -44,8 +44,9 @@ HEADER:
 
   1-byte number (C) of "chunks"
 
-  1-byte (reserved for later use)
-     Current clients should ignore this value.
+  1-byte number (B) of base commit-graphs
+      We infer the length (H*B) of the Base Graphs chunk
+      from this value.
 
 CHUNK LOOKUP:
 
@@ -92,6 +93,12 @@ CHUNK DATA:
       positions for the parents until reaching a value with the most-significant
       bit on. The other bits correspond to the position of the last parent.
 
+  Base Graphs List (ID: {'B', 'A', 'S', 'E'}) [Optional]
+      This list of H-byte hashes describe a set of B commit-graph files that
+      form a commit-graph chain. The graph position for the ith commit in this
+      file's OID Lookup chunk is equal to i plus the number of commits in all
+      base graphs.  If B is non-zero, this chunk must exist.
+
 TRAILER:
 
        H-byte HASH-checksum of all of the above.
index fb53341..729fbcb 100644 (file)
@@ -127,6 +127,197 @@ Design Details
   helpful for these clones, anyway. The commit-graph will not be read or
   written when shallow commits are present.
 
+Commit Graphs Chains
+--------------------
+
+Typically, repos grow with near-constant velocity (commits per day). Over time,
+the number of commits added by a fetch operation is much smaller than the
+number of commits in the full history. By creating a "chain" of commit-graphs,
+we enable fast writes of new commit data without rewriting the entire commit
+history -- at least, most of the time.
+
+## File Layout
+
+A commit-graph chain uses multiple files, and we use a fixed naming convention
+to organize these files. Each commit-graph file has a name
+`$OBJDIR/info/commit-graphs/graph-{hash}.graph` where `{hash}` is the hex-
+valued hash stored in the footer of that file (which is a hash of the file's
+contents before that hash). For a chain of commit-graph files, a plain-text
+file at `$OBJDIR/info/commit-graphs/commit-graph-chain` contains the
+hashes for the files in order from "lowest" to "highest".
+
+For example, if the `commit-graph-chain` file contains the lines
+
+```
+       {hash0}
+       {hash1}
+       {hash2}
+```
+
+then the commit-graph chain looks like the following diagram:
+
+ +-----------------------+
+ |  graph-{hash2}.graph  |
+ +-----------------------+
+         |
+ +-----------------------+
+ |                       |
+ |  graph-{hash1}.graph  |
+ |                       |
+ +-----------------------+
+         |
+ +-----------------------+
+ |                       |
+ |                       |
+ |                       |
+ |  graph-{hash0}.graph  |
+ |                       |
+ |                       |
+ |                       |
+ +-----------------------+
+
+Let X0 be the number of commits in `graph-{hash0}.graph`, X1 be the number of
+commits in `graph-{hash1}.graph`, and X2 be the number of commits in
+`graph-{hash2}.graph`. If a commit appears in position i in `graph-{hash2}.graph`,
+then we interpret this as being the commit in position (X0 + X1 + i), and that
+will be used as its "graph position". The commits in `graph-{hash2}.graph` use these
+positions to refer to their parents, which may be in `graph-{hash1}.graph` or
+`graph-{hash0}.graph`. We can navigate to an arbitrary commit in position j by checking
+its containment in the intervals [0, X0), [X0, X0 + X1), [X0 + X1, X0 + X1 +
+X2).
+
+Each commit-graph file (except the base, `graph-{hash0}.graph`) contains data
+specifying the hashes of all files in the lower layers. In the above example,
+`graph-{hash1}.graph` contains `{hash0}` while `graph-{hash2}.graph` contains
+`{hash0}` and `{hash1}`.
+
+## Merging commit-graph files
+
+If we only added a new commit-graph file on every write, we would run into a
+linear search problem through many commit-graph files.  Instead, we use a merge
+strategy to decide when the stack should collapse some number of levels.
+
+The diagram below shows such a collapse. As a set of new commits are added, it
+is determined by the merge strategy that the files should collapse to
+`graph-{hash1}`. Thus, the new commits, the commits in `graph-{hash2}` and
+the commits in `graph-{hash1}` should be combined into a new `graph-{hash3}`
+file.
+
+                           +---------------------+
+                           |                     |
+                           |    (new commits)    |
+                           |                     |
+                           +---------------------+
+                           |                     |
+ +-----------------------+  +---------------------+
+ |  graph-{hash2} |->|                     |
+ +-----------------------+  +---------------------+
+         |                 |                     |
+ +-----------------------+  +---------------------+
+ |                       |  |                     |
+ |  graph-{hash1} |->|                     |
+ |                       |  |                     |
+ +-----------------------+  +---------------------+
+         |                  tmp_graphXXX
+ +-----------------------+
+ |                       |
+ |                       |
+ |                       |
+ |  graph-{hash0} |
+ |                       |
+ |                       |
+ |                       |
+ +-----------------------+
+
+During this process, the commits to write are combined, sorted and we write the
+contents to a temporary file, all while holding a `commit-graph-chain.lock`
+lock-file.  When the file is flushed, we rename it to `graph-{hash3}`
+according to the computed `{hash3}`. Finally, we write the new chain data to
+`commit-graph-chain.lock`:
+
+```
+       {hash3}
+       {hash0}
+```
+
+We then close the lock-file.
+
+## Merge Strategy
+
+When writing a set of commits that do not exist in the commit-graph stack of
+height N, we default to creating a new file at level N + 1. We then decide to
+merge with the Nth level if one of two conditions hold:
+
+  1. `--size-multiple=<X>` is specified or X = 2, and the number of commits in
+     level N is less than X times the number of commits in level N + 1.
+
+  2. `--max-commits=<C>` is specified with non-zero C and the number of commits
+     in level N + 1 is more than C commits.
+
+This decision cascades down the levels: when we merge a level we create a new
+set of commits that then compares to the next level.
+
+The first condition bounds the number of levels to be logarithmic in the total
+number of commits.  The second condition bounds the total number of commits in
+a `graph-{hashN}` file and not in the `commit-graph` file, preventing
+significant performance issues when the stack merges and another process only
+partially reads the previous stack.
+
+The merge strategy values (2 for the size multiple, 64,000 for the maximum
+number of commits) could be extracted into config settings for full
+flexibility.
+
+## Deleting graph-{hash} files
+
+After a new tip file is written, some `graph-{hash}` files may no longer
+be part of a chain. It is important to remove these files from disk, eventually.
+The main reason to delay removal is that another process could read the
+`commit-graph-chain` file before it is rewritten, but then look for the
+`graph-{hash}` files after they are deleted.
+
+To allow holding old split commit-graphs for a while after they are unreferenced,
+we update the modified times of the files when they become unreferenced. Then,
+we scan the `$OBJDIR/info/commit-graphs/` directory for `graph-{hash}`
+files whose modified times are older than a given expiry window. This window
+defaults to zero, but can be changed using command-line arguments or a config
+setting.
+
+## Chains across multiple object directories
+
+In a repo with alternates, we look for the `commit-graph-chain` file starting
+in the local object directory and then in each alternate. The first file that
+exists defines our chain. As we look for the `graph-{hash}` files for
+each `{hash}` in the chain file, we follow the same pattern for the host
+directories.
+
+This allows commit-graphs to be split across multiple forks in a fork network.
+The typical case is a large "base" repo with many smaller forks.
+
+As the base repo advances, it will likely update and merge its commit-graph
+chain more frequently than the forks. If a fork updates their commit-graph after
+the base repo, then it should "reparent" the commit-graph chain onto the new
+chain in the base repo. When reading each `graph-{hash}` file, we track
+the object directory containing it. During a write of a new commit-graph file,
+we check for any changes in the source object directory and read the
+`commit-graph-chain` file for that source and create a new file based on those
+files. During this "reparent" operation, we necessarily need to collapse all
+levels in the fork, as all of the files are invalid against the new base file.
+
+It is crucial to be careful when cleaning up "unreferenced" `graph-{hash}.graph`
+files in this scenario. It falls to the user to define the proper settings for
+their custom environment:
+
+ 1. When merging levels in the base repo, the unreferenced files may still be
+    referenced by chains from fork repos.
+
+ 2. The expiry time should be set to a length of time such that every fork has
+    time to recompute their commit-graph chain to "reparent" onto the new base
+    file(s).
+
+ 3. If the commit-graph chain is updated in the base, the fork will not have
+    access to the new chain until its chain is updated to reference those files.
+    (This may change in the future [5].)
+
 Related Links
 -------------
 [0] https://bugs.chromium.org/p/git/issues/detail?id=8
@@ -153,3 +344,7 @@ Related Links
 
 [4] https://public-inbox.org/git/20180108154822.54829-1-git@jeffhostetler.com/T/#u
     A patch to remove the ahead-behind calculation from 'status'.
+
+[5] https://public-inbox.org/git/f27db281-abad-5043-6d71-cbb083b1c877@gmail.com/
+    A discussion of a "two-dimensional graph position" that can allow reading
+    multiple commit-graph chains at the same time.
index bc2ace2..2ae8fa4 100644 (file)
@@ -456,7 +456,7 @@ packfile marked as UNREACHABLE_GARBAGE (using the PSRC field; see
 below). To avoid the race when writing new objects referring to an
 about-to-be-deleted object, code paths that write new objects will
 need to copy any objects from UNREACHABLE_GARBAGE packs that they
-refer to to new, non-UNREACHABLE_GARBAGE packs (or loose objects).
+refer to new, non-UNREACHABLE_GARBAGE packs (or loose objects).
 UNREACHABLE_GARBAGE are then safe to delete if their creation time (as
 indicated by the file's mtime) is long enough ago.
 
index 896c7b3..210373e 100644 (file)
@@ -30,12 +30,20 @@ advance* during clone and fetch operations and thereby reduce download
 times and disk usage.  Missing objects can later be "demand fetched"
 if/when needed.
 
+A remote that can later provide the missing objects is called a
+promisor remote, as it promises to send the objects when
+requested. Initialy Git supported only one promisor remote, the origin
+remote from which the user cloned and that was configured in the
+"extensions.partialClone" config option. Later support for more than
+one promisor remote has been implemented.
+
 Use of partial clone requires that the user be online and the origin
-remote be available for on-demand fetching of missing objects.  This may
-or may not be problematic for the user.  For example, if the user can
-stay within the pre-selected subset of the source tree, they may not
-encounter any missing objects.  Alternatively, the user could try to
-pre-fetch various objects if they know that they are going offline.
+remote or other promisor remotes be available for on-demand fetching
+of missing objects.  This may or may not be problematic for the user.
+For example, if the user can stay within the pre-selected subset of
+the source tree, they may not encounter any missing objects.
+Alternatively, the user could try to pre-fetch various objects if they
+know that they are going offline.
 
 
 Non-Goals
@@ -100,18 +108,18 @@ or commits that reference missing trees.
 Handling Missing Objects
 ------------------------
 
-- An object may be missing due to a partial clone or fetch, or missing due
-  to repository corruption.  To differentiate these cases, the local
-  repository specially indicates such filtered packfiles obtained from the
-  promisor remote as "promisor packfiles".
+- An object may be missing due to a partial clone or fetch, or missing
+  due to repository corruption.  To differentiate these cases, the
+  local repository specially indicates such filtered packfiles
+  obtained from promisor remotes as "promisor packfiles".
 +
 These promisor packfiles consist of a "<name>.promisor" file with
 arbitrary contents (like the "<name>.keep" files), in addition to
 their "<name>.pack" and "<name>.idx" files.
 
 - The local repository considers a "promisor object" to be an object that
-  it knows (to the best of its ability) that the promisor remote has promised
-  that it has, either because the local repository has that object in one of
+  it knows (to the best of its ability) that promisor remotes have promised
+  that they have, either because the local repository has that object in one of
   its promisor packfiles, or because another promisor object refers to it.
 +
 When Git encounters a missing object, Git can see if it is a promisor object
@@ -123,12 +131,12 @@ expensive-to-modify list of missing objects.[a]
 - Since almost all Git code currently expects any referenced object to be
   present locally and because we do not want to force every command to do
   a dry-run first, a fallback mechanism is added to allow Git to attempt
-  to dynamically fetch missing objects from the promisor remote.
+  to dynamically fetch missing objects from promisor remotes.
 +
 When the normal object lookup fails to find an object, Git invokes
-fetch-object to try to get the object from the server and then retry
-the object lookup.  This allows objects to be "faulted in" without
-complicated prediction algorithms.
+promisor_remote_get_direct() to try to get the object from a promisor
+remote and then retry the object lookup.  This allows objects to be
+"faulted in" without complicated prediction algorithms.
 +
 For efficiency reasons, no check as to whether the missing object is
 actually a promisor object is performed.
@@ -157,8 +165,7 @@ and prefetch those objects in bulk.
 +
 We are not happy with this global variable and would like to remove it,
 but that requires significant refactoring of the object code to pass an
-additional flag.  We hope that concurrent efforts to add an ODB API can
-encompass this.
+additional flag.
 
 
 Fetching Missing Objects
@@ -182,21 +189,63 @@ has been updated to not use any object flags when the corresponding argument
   though they are not necessary.
 
 
+Using many promisor remotes
+---------------------------
+
+Many promisor remotes can be configured and used.
+
+This allows for example a user to have multiple geographically-close
+cache servers for fetching missing blobs while continuing to do
+filtered `git-fetch` commands from the central server.
+
+When fetching objects, promisor remotes are tried one after the other
+until all the objects have been fetched.
+
+Remotes that are considered "promisor" remotes are those specified by
+the following configuration variables:
+
+- `extensions.partialClone = <name>`
+
+- `remote.<name>.promisor = true`
+
+- `remote.<name>.partialCloneFilter = ...`
+
+Only one promisor remote can be configured using the
+`extensions.partialClone` config variable. This promisor remote will
+be the last one tried when fetching objects.
+
+We decided to make it the last one we try, because it is likely that
+someone using many promisor remotes is doing so because the other
+promisor remotes are better for some reason (maybe they are closer or
+faster for some kind of objects) than the origin, and the origin is
+likely to be the remote specified by extensions.partialClone.
+
+This justification is not very strong, but one choice had to be made,
+and anyway the long term plan should be to make the order somehow
+fully configurable.
+
+For now though the other promisor remotes will be tried in the order
+they appear in the config file.
+
 Current Limitations
 -------------------
 
-- The remote used for a partial clone (or the first partial fetch
-  following a regular clone) is marked as the "promisor remote".
+- It is not possible to specify the order in which the promisor
+  remotes are tried in other ways than the order in which they appear
+  in the config file.
 +
-We are currently limited to a single promisor remote and only that
-remote may be used for subsequent partial fetches.
+It is also not possible to specify an order to be used when fetching
+from one remote and a different order when fetching from another
+remote.
+
+- It is not possible to push only specific objects to a promisor
+  remote.
 +
-We accept this limitation because we believe initial users of this
-feature will be using it on repositories with a strong single central
-server.
+It is not possible to push at the same time to multiple promisor
+remote in a specific order.
 
-- Dynamic object fetching will only ask the promisor remote for missing
-  objects.  We assume that the promisor remote has a complete view of the
+- Dynamic object fetching will only ask promisor remotes for missing
+  objects.  We assume that promisor remotes have a complete view of the
   repository and can satisfy all such requests.
 
 - Repack essentially treats promisor and non-promisor packfiles as 2
@@ -218,15 +267,17 @@ server.
 Future Work
 -----------
 
-- Allow more than one promisor remote and define a strategy for fetching
-  missing objects from specific promisor remotes or of iterating over the
-  set of promisor remotes until a missing object is found.
+- Improve the way to specify the order in which promisor remotes are
+  tried.
 +
-A user might want to have multiple geographically-close cache servers
-for fetching missing blobs while continuing to do filtered `git-fetch`
-commands from the central server, for example.
+For example this could allow to specify explicitly something like:
+"When fetching from this remote, I want to use these promisor remotes
+in this order, though, when pushing or fetching to that remote, I want
+to use those promisor remotes in that order."
+
+- Allow pushing to promisor remotes.
 +
-Or the user might want to work in a triangular work flow with multiple
+The user might want to work in a triangular work flow with multiple
 promisor remotes that each have an incomplete view of the repository.
 
 - Allow repack to work on promisor packfiles (while keeping them distinct
index 03264c7..40f91f6 100644 (file)
@@ -141,7 +141,7 @@ Capabilities
 ------------
 
 There are two different types of capabilities: normal capabilities,
-which can be used to to convey information or alter the behavior of a
+which can be used to convey information or alter the behavior of a
 request, and commands, which are the core actions that a client wants to
 perform (fetch, push, etc).
 
index eff7890..8bce75b 100644 (file)
@@ -122,10 +122,10 @@ Tags are expected to always point at the same version of a project,
 while heads are expected to advance as development progresses.
 
 Create a new branch head pointing to one of these versions and check it
-out using linkgit:git-checkout[1]:
+out using linkgit:git-switch[1]:
 
 ------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout -b new v2.6.13
+$ git switch -c new v2.6.13
 ------------------------------------------------
 
 The working directory then reflects the contents that the project had
@@ -282,10 +282,10 @@ a summary of the commands:
        this command will fail with a warning.
 `git branch -D <branch>`::
        delete the branch `<branch>` irrespective of its merged status.
-`git checkout <branch>`::
+`git switch <branch>`::
        make the current branch `<branch>`, updating the working
        directory to reflect the version referenced by `<branch>`.
-`git checkout -b <new> <start-point>`::
+`git switch -c <new> <start-point>`::
        create a new branch `<new>` referencing `<start-point>`, and
        check it out.
 
@@ -302,22 +302,22 @@ ref: refs/heads/master
 Examining an old version without creating a new branch
 ------------------------------------------------------
 
-The `git checkout` command normally expects a branch head, but will also
-accept an arbitrary commit; for example, you can check out the commit
-referenced by a tag:
+The `git switch` command normally expects a branch head, but will also
+accept an arbitrary commit when invoked with --detach; for example,
+you can check out the commit referenced by a tag:
 
 ------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout v2.6.17
+$ git switch --detach v2.6.17
 Note: checking out 'v2.6.17'.
 
 You are in 'detached HEAD' state. You can look around, make experimental
 changes and commit them, and you can discard any commits you make in this
-state without impacting any branches by performing another checkout.
+state without impacting any branches by performing another switch.
 
 If you want to create a new branch to retain commits you create, you may
-do so (now or later) by using -b with the checkout command again. Example:
+do so (now or later) by using -c with the switch command again. Example:
 
-  git checkout -b new_branch_name
+  git switch -c new_branch_name
 
 HEAD is now at 427abfa Linux v2.6.17
 ------------------------------------------------
@@ -373,7 +373,7 @@ You might want to build on one of these remote-tracking branches
 on a branch of your own, just as you would for a tag:
 
 ------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout -b my-todo-copy origin/todo
+$ git switch -c my-todo-copy origin/todo
 ------------------------------------------------
 
 You can also check out `origin/todo` directly to examine it or
@@ -1408,7 +1408,7 @@ If you get stuck and decide to just give up and throw the whole mess
 away, you can always return to the pre-merge state with
 
 -------------------------------------------------
-$ git reset --hard HEAD
+$ git merge --abort
 -------------------------------------------------
 
 Or, if you've already committed the merge that you want to throw away,
@@ -1446,7 +1446,7 @@ mistake, you can return the entire working tree to the last committed
 state with
 
 -------------------------------------------------
-$ git reset --hard HEAD
+$ git restore --staged --worktree :/
 -------------------------------------------------
 
 If you make a commit that you later wish you hadn't, there are two
@@ -1523,12 +1523,10 @@ Checking out an old version of a file
 
 In the process of undoing a previous bad change, you may find it
 useful to check out an older version of a particular file using
-linkgit:git-checkout[1].  We've used `git checkout` before to switch
-branches, but it has quite different behavior if it is given a path
-name: the command
+linkgit:git-restore[1]. The command
 
 -------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout HEAD^ path/to/file
+$ git restore --source=HEAD^ path/to/file
 -------------------------------------------------
 
 replaces path/to/file by the contents it had in the commit HEAD^, and
@@ -2211,8 +2209,8 @@ $ git branch --track release origin/master
 These can be easily kept up to date using linkgit:git-pull[1].
 
 -------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout test && git pull
-$ git checkout release && git pull
+$ git switch test && git pull
+$ git switch release && git pull
 -------------------------------------------------
 
 Important note!  If you have any local changes in these branches, then
@@ -2264,7 +2262,7 @@ tested changes
 2) help future bug hunters that use `git bisect` to find problems
 
 -------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout -b speed-up-spinlocks v2.6.35
+$ git switch -c speed-up-spinlocks v2.6.35
 -------------------------------------------------
 
 Now you apply the patch(es), run some tests, and commit the change(s).  If
@@ -2279,7 +2277,7 @@ When you are happy with the state of this change, you can merge it into the
 "test" branch in preparation to make it public:
 
 -------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout test && git merge speed-up-spinlocks
+$ git switch test && git merge speed-up-spinlocks
 -------------------------------------------------
 
 It is unlikely that you would have any conflicts here ... but you might if you
@@ -2291,7 +2289,7 @@ see the value of keeping each patch (or patch series) in its own branch.  It
 means that the patches can be moved into the `release` tree in any order.
 
 -------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout release && git merge speed-up-spinlocks
+$ git switch release && git merge speed-up-spinlocks
 -------------------------------------------------
 
 After a while, you will have a number of branches, and despite the
@@ -2512,7 +2510,7 @@ Suppose that you create a branch `mywork` on a remote-tracking branch
 `origin`, and create some commits on top of it:
 
 -------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout -b mywork origin
+$ git switch -c mywork origin
 $ vi file.txt
 $ git commit
 $ vi otherfile.txt
@@ -2552,7 +2550,7 @@ commits without any merges, you may instead choose to use
 linkgit:git-rebase[1]:
 
 -------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout mywork
+$ git switch mywork
 $ git rebase origin
 -------------------------------------------------
 
@@ -3668,13 +3666,13 @@ change within the submodule, and then update the superproject to reference the
 new commit:
 
 -------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout master
+$ git switch master
 -------------------------------------------------
 
 or
 
 -------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout -b fix-up
+$ git switch -c fix-up
 -------------------------------------------------
 
 then
@@ -3800,8 +3798,8 @@ use linkgit:git-tag[1] for both.
 The Workflow
 ------------
 
-High-level operations such as linkgit:git-commit[1],
-linkgit:git-checkout[1] and linkgit:git-reset[1] work by moving data
+High-level operations such as linkgit:git-commit[1] and
+linkgit:git-restore[1] work by moving data
 between the working tree, the index, and the object database.  Git
 provides low-level operations which perform each of these steps
 individually.
@@ -4194,7 +4192,7 @@ start.
 A good place to start is with the contents of the initial commit, with:
 
 ----------------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout e83c5163
+$ git switch --detach e83c5163
 ----------------------------------------------------
 
 The initial revision lays the foundation for almost everything Git has
@@ -4437,10 +4435,10 @@ Managing branches
 -----------------
 
 -----------------------------------------------
-$ git branch        # list all local branches in this repo
-$ git checkout test  # switch working directory to branch "test"
-$ git branch new     # create branch "new" starting at current HEAD
-$ git branch -d new  # delete branch "new"
+$ git branch                   # list all local branches in this repo
+$ git switch test              # switch working directory to branch "test"
+$ git branch new               # create branch "new" starting at current HEAD
+$ git branch -d new            # delete branch "new"
 -----------------------------------------------
 
 Instead of basing a new branch on current HEAD (the default), use:
@@ -4456,7 +4454,7 @@ $ git branch new test~10 # ten commits before tip of branch "test"
 Create and switch to a new branch at the same time:
 
 -----------------------------------------------
-$ git checkout -b new v2.6.15
+$ git switch -c new v2.6.15
 -----------------------------------------------
 
 Update and examine branches from the repository you cloned from:
@@ -4467,7 +4465,7 @@ $ git branch -r           # list
   origin/master
   origin/next
   ...
-$ git checkout -b masterwork origin/master
+$ git switch -c masterwork origin/master
 -----------------------------------------------
 
 Fetch a branch from a different repository, and give it a new
index ac51bac..98f88a2 100755 (executable)
@@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
 #!/bin/sh
 
 GVF=GIT-VERSION-FILE
-DEF_VER=v2.22.1
+DEF_VER=v2.23.GIT
 
 LF='
 '
index 8a7e235..f879697 100644 (file)
--- a/Makefile
+++ b/Makefile
@@ -265,10 +265,6 @@ all::
 #
 # Define NO_DEFLATE_BOUND if your zlib does not have deflateBound.
 #
-# Define NO_R_TO_GCC_LINKER if your gcc does not like "-R/path/lib"
-# that tells runtime paths to dynamic libraries;
-# "-Wl,-rpath=/path/lib" is used instead.
-#
 # Define NO_NORETURN if using buggy versions of gcc 4.6+ and profile feedback,
 # as the compiler can crash (http://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=49299)
 #
@@ -624,8 +620,6 @@ SCRIPT_SH += git-web--browse.sh
 
 SCRIPT_LIB += git-mergetool--lib
 SCRIPT_LIB += git-parse-remote
-SCRIPT_LIB += git-rebase--am
-SCRIPT_LIB += git-rebase--common
 SCRIPT_LIB += git-rebase--preserve-merges
 SCRIPT_LIB += git-sh-setup
 SCRIPT_LIB += git-sh-i18n
@@ -710,6 +704,7 @@ TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-config.o
 TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-ctype.o
 TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-date.o
 TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-delta.o
+TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-dir-iterator.o
 TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-drop-caches.o
 TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-dump-cache-tree.o
 TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-dump-fsmonitor.o
@@ -727,6 +722,7 @@ TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-lazy-init-name-hash.o
 TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-match-trees.o
 TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-mergesort.o
 TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-mktemp.o
+TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-oidmap.o
 TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-online-cpus.o
 TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-parse-options.o
 TEST_BUILTINS_OBJS += test-path-utils.o
@@ -777,9 +773,11 @@ BUILT_INS += git-format-patch$X
 BUILT_INS += git-fsck-objects$X
 BUILT_INS += git-init$X
 BUILT_INS += git-merge-subtree$X
+BUILT_INS += git-restore$X
 BUILT_INS += git-show$X
 BUILT_INS += git-stage$X
 BUILT_INS += git-status$X
+BUILT_INS += git-switch$X
 BUILT_INS += git-whatchanged$X
 
 # what 'all' will build and 'install' will install in gitexecdir,
@@ -886,7 +884,6 @@ LIB_OBJS += ewah/ewah_io.o
 LIB_OBJS += ewah/ewah_rlw.o
 LIB_OBJS += exec-cmd.o
 LIB_OBJS += fetch-negotiator.o
-LIB_OBJS += fetch-object.o
 LIB_OBJS += fetch-pack.o
 LIB_OBJS += fsck.o
 LIB_OBJS += fsmonitor.o
@@ -950,6 +947,7 @@ LIB_OBJS += preload-index.o
 LIB_OBJS += pretty.o
 LIB_OBJS += prio-queue.o
 LIB_OBJS += progress.o
+LIB_OBJS += promisor-remote.o
 LIB_OBJS += prompt.o
 LIB_OBJS += protocol.o
 LIB_OBJS += quote.o
@@ -967,6 +965,7 @@ LIB_OBJS += refspec.o
 LIB_OBJS += ref-filter.o
 LIB_OBJS += remote.o
 LIB_OBJS += replace-object.o
+LIB_OBJS += repo-settings.o
 LIB_OBJS += repository.o
 LIB_OBJS += rerere.o
 LIB_OBJS += resolve-undo.o
@@ -1065,6 +1064,7 @@ BUILTIN_OBJS += builtin/diff-index.o
 BUILTIN_OBJS += builtin/diff-tree.o
 BUILTIN_OBJS += builtin/diff.o
 BUILTIN_OBJS += builtin/difftool.o
+BUILTIN_OBJS += builtin/env--helper.o
 BUILTIN_OBJS += builtin/fast-export.o
 BUILTIN_OBJS += builtin/fetch-pack.o
 BUILTIN_OBJS += builtin/fetch.o
@@ -1160,6 +1160,7 @@ endif
 # which'll override these defaults.
 CFLAGS = -g -O2 -Wall
 LDFLAGS =
+CC_LD_DYNPATH = -Wl,-rpath,
 BASIC_CFLAGS = -I.
 BASIC_LDFLAGS =
 
@@ -1240,7 +1241,7 @@ endif
 
 ifdef SANE_TOOL_PATH
 SANE_TOOL_PATH_SQ = $(subst ','\'',$(SANE_TOOL_PATH))
-BROKEN_PATH_FIX = 's|^\# @@BROKEN_PATH_FIX@@$$|git_broken_path_fix $(SANE_TOOL_PATH_SQ)|'
+BROKEN_PATH_FIX = 's|^\# @@BROKEN_PATH_FIX@@$$|git_broken_path_fix "$(SANE_TOOL_PATH_SQ)"|'
 PATH := $(SANE_TOOL_PATH):${PATH}
 else
 BROKEN_PATH_FIX = '/^\# @@BROKEN_PATH_FIX@@$$/d'
@@ -1290,16 +1291,6 @@ ifeq ($(uname_S),Darwin)
        PTHREAD_LIBS =
 endif
 
-ifndef CC_LD_DYNPATH
-       ifdef NO_R_TO_GCC_LINKER
-               # Some gcc does not accept and pass -R to the linker to specify
-               # the runtime dynamic library path.
-               CC_LD_DYNPATH = -Wl,-rpath,
-       else
-               CC_LD_DYNPATH = -R
-       endif
-endif
-
 ifdef NO_LIBGEN_H
        COMPAT_CFLAGS += -DNO_LIBGEN_H
        COMPAT_OBJS += compat/basename.o
@@ -2730,7 +2721,7 @@ bin-wrappers/%: wrap-for-bin.sh
        @mkdir -p bin-wrappers
        $(QUIET_GEN)sed -e '1s|#!.*/sh|#!$(SHELL_PATH_SQ)|' \
             -e 's|@@BUILD_DIR@@|$(shell pwd)|' \
-            -e 's|@@PROG@@|$(patsubst test-%,t/helper/test-%,$(@F))|' < $< > $@ && \
+            -e 's|@@PROG@@|$(patsubst test-%,t/helper/test-%$(X),$(@F))$(patsubst git%,$(X),$(filter $(@F),$(BINDIR_PROGRAMS_NEED_X)))|' < $< > $@ && \
        chmod +x $@
 
 # GNU make supports exporting all variables by "export" without parameters.
@@ -2873,6 +2864,33 @@ install: all
        $(INSTALL) $(ALL_PROGRAMS) '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(gitexec_instdir_SQ)'
        $(INSTALL) -m 644 $(SCRIPT_LIB) '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(gitexec_instdir_SQ)'
        $(INSTALL) $(install_bindir_programs) '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(bindir_SQ)'
+ifdef MSVC
+       # We DO NOT install the individual foo.o.pdb files because they
+       # have already been rolled up into the exe's pdb file.
+       # We DO NOT have pdb files for the builtin commands (like git-status.exe)
+       # because it is just a copy/hardlink of git.exe, rather than a unique binary.
+       $(INSTALL) git.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(bindir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) git-shell.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(bindir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) git-upload-pack.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(bindir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) git-credential-store.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(gitexec_instdir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) git-daemon.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(gitexec_instdir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) git-fast-import.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(gitexec_instdir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) git-http-backend.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(gitexec_instdir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) git-http-fetch.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(gitexec_instdir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) git-http-push.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(gitexec_instdir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) git-imap-send.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(gitexec_instdir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) git-remote-http.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(gitexec_instdir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) git-remote-testsvn.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(gitexec_instdir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) git-sh-i18n--envsubst.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(gitexec_instdir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) git-show-index.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(gitexec_instdir_SQ)'
+ifndef DEBUG
+       $(INSTALL) $(vcpkg_rel_bin)/*.dll '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(bindir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) $(vcpkg_rel_bin)/*.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(bindir_SQ)'
+else
+       $(INSTALL) $(vcpkg_dbg_bin)/*.dll '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(bindir_SQ)'
+       $(INSTALL) $(vcpkg_dbg_bin)/*.pdb '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(bindir_SQ)'
+endif
+endif
        $(MAKE) -C templates DESTDIR='$(DESTDIR_SQ)' install
        $(INSTALL) -d -m 755 '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(mergetools_instdir_SQ)'
        $(INSTALL) -m 644 mergetools/* '$(DESTDIR_SQ)$(mergetools_instdir_SQ)'
@@ -3085,6 +3103,19 @@ endif
        $(RM) GIT-VERSION-FILE GIT-CFLAGS GIT-LDFLAGS GIT-BUILD-OPTIONS
        $(RM) GIT-USER-AGENT GIT-PREFIX
        $(RM) GIT-SCRIPT-DEFINES GIT-PERL-DEFINES GIT-PERL-HEADER GIT-PYTHON-VARS
+ifdef MSVC
+       $(RM) $(patsubst %.o,%.o.pdb,$(OBJECTS))
+       $(RM) $(patsubst %.exe,%.pdb,$(OTHER_PROGRAMS))
+       $(RM) $(patsubst %.exe,%.iobj,$(OTHER_PROGRAMS))
+       $(RM) $(patsubst %.exe,%.ipdb,$(OTHER_PROGRAMS))
+       $(RM) $(patsubst %.exe,%.pdb,$(PROGRAMS))
+       $(RM) $(patsubst %.exe,%.iobj,$(PROGRAMS))
+       $(RM) $(patsubst %.exe,%.ipdb,$(PROGRAMS))
+       $(RM) $(patsubst %.exe,%.pdb,$(TEST_PROGRAMS))
+       $(RM) $(patsubst %.exe,%.iobj,$(TEST_PROGRAMS))
+       $(RM) $(patsubst %.exe,%.ipdb,$(TEST_PROGRAMS))
+       $(RM) compat/vcbuild/MSVC-DEFS-GEN
+endif
 
 .PHONY: all install profile-clean cocciclean clean strip
 .PHONY: shell_compatibility_test please_set_SHELL_PATH_to_a_more_modern_shell
index 30cbde7..fc657e7 120000 (symlink)
--- a/RelNotes
+++ b/RelNotes
@@ -1 +1 @@
-Documentation/RelNotes/2.22.1.txt
\ No newline at end of file
+Documentation/RelNotes/2.24.0.txt
\ No newline at end of file
index ce5f374..3ee0ee2 100644 (file)
--- a/advice.c
+++ b/advice.c
@@ -3,6 +3,7 @@
 #include "color.h"
 #include "help.h"
 
+int advice_fetch_show_forced_updates = 1;
 int advice_push_update_rejected = 1;
 int advice_push_non_ff_current = 1;
 int advice_push_non_ff_matching = 1;
@@ -12,9 +13,11 @@ int advice_push_needs_force = 1;
 int advice_push_unqualified_ref_name = 1;
 int advice_status_hints = 1;
 int advice_status_u_option = 1;
+int advice_status_ahead_behind_warning = 1;
 int advice_commit_before_merge = 1;
 int advice_reset_quiet_warning = 1;
 int advice_resolve_conflict = 1;
+int advice_sequencer_in_use = 1;
 int advice_implicit_identity = 1;
 int advice_detached_head = 1;
 int advice_set_upstream_failure = 1;
@@ -59,6 +62,7 @@ static struct {
        const char *name;
        int *preference;
 } advice_config[] = {
+       { "fetchShowForcedUpdates", &advice_fetch_show_forced_updates },
        { "pushUpdateRejected", &advice_push_update_rejected },
        { "pushNonFFCurrent", &advice_push_non_ff_current },
        { "pushNonFFMatching", &advice_push_non_ff_matching },
@@ -68,9 +72,11 @@ static struct {
        { "pushUnqualifiedRefName", &advice_push_unqualified_ref_name },
        { "statusHints", &advice_status_hints },
        { "statusUoption", &advice_status_u_option },
+       { "statusAheadBehindWarning", &advice_status_ahead_behind_warning },
        { "commitBeforeMerge", &advice_commit_before_merge },
        { "resetQuiet", &advice_reset_quiet_warning },
        { "resolveConflict", &advice_resolve_conflict },
+       { "sequencerInUse", &advice_sequencer_in_use },
        { "implicitIdentity", &advice_implicit_identity },
        { "detachedHead", &advice_detached_head },
        { "setupStreamFailure", &advice_set_upstream_failure },
@@ -193,13 +199,22 @@ void NORETURN die_conclude_merge(void)
 void detach_advice(const