Merge branch 'jc/merge-base' (early part)
authorJunio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
Wed, 14 Feb 2007 00:50:32 +0000 (16:50 -0800)
committerJunio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
Wed, 14 Feb 2007 00:54:35 +0000 (16:54 -0800)
This contains an evil merge to fast-import, in order to
resolve in_merge_bases() update.

334 files changed:
.gitignore
.mailmap
Documentation/.gitignore
Documentation/Makefile
Documentation/RelNotes-1.5.0.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/SubmittingPatches
Documentation/cmd-list.perl [new file with mode: 0755]
Documentation/config.txt
Documentation/core-intro.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/core-tutorial.txt
Documentation/cvs-migration.txt
Documentation/diff-format.txt
Documentation/diff-options.txt
Documentation/diffcore.txt
Documentation/docbook-xsl.css [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/everyday.txt
Documentation/git-add.txt
Documentation/git-am.txt
Documentation/git-apply.txt
Documentation/git-applymbox.txt
Documentation/git-applypatch.txt
Documentation/git-archive.txt
Documentation/git-bisect.txt
Documentation/git-blame.txt
Documentation/git-branch.txt
Documentation/git-cat-file.txt
Documentation/git-checkout-index.txt
Documentation/git-checkout.txt
Documentation/git-cherry-pick.txt
Documentation/git-clone.txt
Documentation/git-commit-tree.txt
Documentation/git-commit.txt
Documentation/git-config.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/git-count-objects.txt
Documentation/git-cvsexportcommit.txt
Documentation/git-cvsimport.txt
Documentation/git-daemon.txt
Documentation/git-describe.txt
Documentation/git-diff-stages.txt [deleted file]
Documentation/git-diff.txt
Documentation/git-fast-import.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/git-fetch-pack.txt
Documentation/git-fetch.txt
Documentation/git-for-each-ref.txt
Documentation/git-format-patch.txt
Documentation/git-fsck-objects.txt
Documentation/git-fsck.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/git-gc.txt
Documentation/git-grep.txt
Documentation/git-hash-object.txt
Documentation/git-http-fetch.txt
Documentation/git-http-push.txt
Documentation/git-init-db.txt
Documentation/git-init.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/git-instaweb.txt
Documentation/git-local-fetch.txt
Documentation/git-log.txt
Documentation/git-ls-files.txt
Documentation/git-ls-remote.txt
Documentation/git-ls-tree.txt
Documentation/git-mailinfo.txt
Documentation/git-mailsplit.txt
Documentation/git-merge-base.txt
Documentation/git-merge-file.txt
Documentation/git-merge-index.txt
Documentation/git-merge-one-file.txt
Documentation/git-merge.txt
Documentation/git-mv.txt
Documentation/git-p4import.txt
Documentation/git-pack-redundant.txt
Documentation/git-pack-refs.txt
Documentation/git-parse-remote.txt
Documentation/git-patch-id.txt
Documentation/git-peek-remote.txt
Documentation/git-prune-packed.txt
Documentation/git-prune.txt
Documentation/git-pull.txt
Documentation/git-push.txt
Documentation/git-rebase.txt
Documentation/git-receive-pack.txt
Documentation/git-reflog.txt
Documentation/git-remote.txt
Documentation/git-repack.txt
Documentation/git-repo-config.txt
Documentation/git-rerere.txt
Documentation/git-reset.txt
Documentation/git-resolve.txt [deleted file]
Documentation/git-rev-list.txt
Documentation/git-rev-parse.txt
Documentation/git-revert.txt
Documentation/git-rm.txt
Documentation/git-send-pack.txt
Documentation/git-sh-setup.txt
Documentation/git-shell.txt
Documentation/git-shortlog.txt
Documentation/git-show-branch.txt
Documentation/git-show.txt
Documentation/git-ssh-fetch.txt
Documentation/git-ssh-upload.txt
Documentation/git-status.txt
Documentation/git-svn.txt
Documentation/git-symbolic-ref.txt
Documentation/git-tag.txt
Documentation/git-tar-tree.txt
Documentation/git-tools.txt
Documentation/git-update-index.txt
Documentation/git-update-ref.txt
Documentation/git-upload-archive.txt
Documentation/git-upload-pack.txt
Documentation/git-var.txt
Documentation/git-whatchanged.txt
Documentation/git-write-tree.txt
Documentation/git.txt
Documentation/gitk.txt
Documentation/glossary.txt
Documentation/hooks.txt
Documentation/howto/dangling-objects.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/howto/rebase-from-internal-branch.txt
Documentation/howto/revert-branch-rebase.txt
Documentation/howto/setup-git-server-over-http.txt
Documentation/install-webdoc.sh
Documentation/repository-layout.txt
Documentation/tutorial-2.txt
Documentation/tutorial.txt
Documentation/user-manual.conf [new file with mode: 0644]
Documentation/user-manual.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
GIT-VERSION-GEN
INSTALL
Makefile
README
RelNotes [new symlink]
builtin-add.c
builtin-annotate.c
builtin-apply.c
builtin-archive.c
builtin-blame.c
builtin-branch.c
builtin-commit-tree.c
builtin-config.c [moved from builtin-repo-config.c with 94% similarity]
builtin-describe.c [new file with mode: 0644]
builtin-diff-stages.c [deleted file]
builtin-for-each-ref.c
builtin-fsck.c [moved from fsck-objects.c with 81% similarity]
builtin-init-db.c
builtin-log.c
builtin-ls-files.c
builtin-mailinfo.c
builtin-pack-objects.c
builtin-pack-refs.c
builtin-prune-packed.c
builtin-push.c
builtin-reflog.c
builtin-rev-parse.c
builtin-rm.c
builtin-show-branch.c
builtin-symbolic-ref.c
builtin-update-index.c
builtin-update-ref.c
builtin.h
cache.h
combine-diff.c
commit.c
commit.h
config.c
connect.c
contrib/blameview/README [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/blameview/blameview.perl [new file with mode: 0755]
contrib/colordiff/README [deleted file]
contrib/colordiff/colordiff.perl [deleted file]
contrib/completion/git-completion.bash
contrib/emacs/git-blame.el [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/emacs/git.el
contrib/emacs/vc-git.el
contrib/examples/git-resolve.sh [moved from git-resolve.sh with 100% similarity]
contrib/fast-import/import-tars.perl [new file with mode: 0755]
contrib/gitview/gitview
contrib/hg-to-git/hg-to-git.py [new file with mode: 0755]
contrib/hg-to-git/hg-to-git.txt [new file with mode: 0644]
contrib/mailmap.linux [deleted file]
contrib/remotes2config.sh
contrib/vim/syntax/gitcommit.vim
daemon.c
date.c
describe.c [deleted file]
diff-lib.c
diff.c
diff.h
diffcore-pickaxe.c
entry.c
environment.c
fast-import.c [new file with mode: 0644]
fetch-pack.c
generate-cmdlist.sh
git-add--interactive.perl
git-am.sh
git-applymbox.sh
git-archimport.perl
git-bisect.sh
git-checkout.sh
git-clean.sh
git-clone.sh
git-commit.sh
git-compat-util.h
git-cvsexportcommit.perl
git-cvsimport.perl
git-cvsserver.perl
git-fetch.sh
git-gc.sh
git-gui/.gitignore [new file with mode: 0644]
git-gui/GIT-VERSION-GEN [new file with mode: 0755]
git-gui/Makefile [new file with mode: 0644]
git-gui/TODO [new file with mode: 0644]
git-gui/git-gui.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
git-instaweb.sh
git-lost-found.sh
git-ls-remote.sh
git-merge-resolve.sh
git-merge.sh
git-p4import.py
git-parse-remote.sh
git-pull.sh
git-quiltimport.sh
git-rebase.sh
git-remote.perl
git-repack.sh
git-reset.sh
git-revert.sh
git-send-email.perl
git-sh-setup.sh
git-svn.perl
git-svnimport.perl
git-tag.sh
git.c
git.spec.in
gitk
gitweb/gitweb.perl
help.c
http-fetch.c
http-push.c
ident.c
index-pack.c
local-fetch.c
log-tree.c
merge-recursive.c
pack.h
pager.c
path.c
peek-remote.c
perl/Git.pm
perl/Makefile.PL
perl/private-Error.pm
ppc/sha1ppc.S
quote.c
quote.h
reachable.c
read-cache.c
receive-pack.c
reflog-walk.c [new file with mode: 0644]
reflog-walk.h [new file with mode: 0644]
refs.c
refs.h
revision.c
revision.h
send-pack.c
server-info.c
setup.c
sha1_file.c
sha1_name.c
shallow.c
ssh-fetch.c
t/README
t/annotate-tests.sh
t/lib-git-svn.sh
t/t0000-basic.sh
t/t1004-read-tree-m-u-wf.sh
t/t1020-subdirectory.sh
t/t1200-tutorial.sh
t/t1300-repo-config.sh
t/t1400-update-ref.sh
t/t1410-reflog.sh
t/t3200-branch.sh
t/t3210-pack-refs.sh
t/t3501-revert-cherry-pick.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t3700-add.sh
t/t3800-mktag.sh
t/t3900-i18n-commit.sh
t/t3901-8859-1.txt [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t3901-i18n-patch.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t3901-utf8.txt [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t4000-diff-format.sh
t/t4006-diff-mode.sh
t/t4013-diff-various.sh
t/t4013/diff.format-patch_--attach_--stdout_initial..master
t/t4013/diff.format-patch_--attach_--stdout_initial..master^
t/t4013/diff.format-patch_--attach_--stdout_initial..side
t/t4013/diff.format-patch_--stdout_initial..master
t/t4013/diff.format-patch_--stdout_initial..master^
t/t4013/diff.format-patch_--stdout_initial..side
t/t4016-diff-quote.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t4102-apply-rename.sh
t/t4116-apply-reverse.sh
t/t4200-rerere.sh
t/t5000-tar-tree.sh
t/t5300-pack-object.sh
t/t5301-sliding-window.sh
t/t5400-send-pack.sh
t/t5401-update-hooks.sh
t/t5500-fetch-pack.sh
t/t5510-fetch.sh
t/t5520-pull.sh
t/t5600-clone-fail-cleanup.sh
t/t5700-clone-reference.sh
t/t5710-info-alternate.sh
t/t6023-merge-file.sh
t/t6023-merge-rename-nocruft.sh
t/t6120-describe.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/t6200-fmt-merge-msg.sh
t/t7001-mv.sh
t/t7201-co.sh
t/t9101-git-svn-props.sh
t/t9102-git-svn-deep-rmdir.sh
t/t9103-git-svn-graft-branches.sh
t/t9104-git-svn-follow-parent.sh
t/t9106-git-svn-commit-diff-clobber.sh
t/t9200-git-cvsexportcommit.sh
t/t9300-fast-import.sh [new file with mode: 0755]
t/test-lib.sh
templates/Makefile
templates/hooks--update
upload-pack.c
var.c
write_or_die.c
wt-status.c
wt-status.h

index 6da1cdb..f15155d 100644 (file)
@@ -23,6 +23,7 @@ git-clean
 git-clone
 git-commit
 git-commit-tree
+git-config
 git-convert-objects
 git-count-objects
 git-cvsexportcommit
@@ -32,15 +33,16 @@ git-daemon
 git-diff
 git-diff-files
 git-diff-index
-git-diff-stages
 git-diff-tree
 git-describe
+git-fast-import
 git-fetch
 git-fetch-pack
 git-findtags
 git-fmt-merge-msg
 git-for-each-ref
 git-format-patch
+git-fsck
 git-fsck-objects
 git-gc
 git-get-tar-commit-id
@@ -69,7 +71,6 @@ git-merge-tree
 git-merge-octopus
 git-merge-one-file
 git-merge-ours
-git-merge-recur
 git-merge-recursive
 git-merge-resolve
 git-merge-stupid
@@ -99,7 +100,6 @@ git-repo-config
 git-request-pull
 git-rerere
 git-reset
-git-resolve
 git-rev-list
 git-rev-parse
 git-revert
index 2c658f4..c7a3a75 100644 (file)
--- a/.mailmap
+++ b/.mailmap
@@ -30,7 +30,9 @@ Robert Fitzsimons <robfitz@273k.net>
 Santi Béjar <sbejar@gmail.com>
 Sean Estabrooks <seanlkml@sympatico.ca>
 Shawn O. Pearce <spearce@spearce.org>
+Theodore Ts'o <tytso@mit.edu>
 Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com>
+Uwe Kleine-König <zeisberg@informatik.uni-freiburg.de>
 Ville Skyttä <scop@xemacs.org>
 YOSHIFUJI Hideaki <yoshfuji@linux-ipv6.org>
 anonymous <linux@horizon.com>
index c87c61a..6a51331 100644 (file)
@@ -4,4 +4,4 @@
 *.7
 howto-index.txt
 doc.dep
-README
+cmds-*.txt
index 93c7024..9e7f2a7 100644 (file)
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ ARTICLES += hooks
 ARTICLES += everyday
 ARTICLES += git-tools
 # with their own formatting rules.
-SP_ARTICLES = glossary howto/revert-branch-rebase
+SP_ARTICLES = glossary howto/revert-branch-rebase user-manual
 
 DOC_HTML += $(patsubst %,%.html,$(ARTICLES) $(SP_ARTICLES))
 
@@ -31,6 +31,8 @@ man1dir=$(mandir)/man1
 man7dir=$(mandir)/man7
 # DESTDIR=
 
+ASCIIDOC=asciidoc
+ASCIIDOC_EXTRA =
 INSTALL?=install
 DOC_REF = origin/man
 
@@ -71,30 +73,44 @@ doc.dep : $(wildcard *.txt) build-docdep.perl
 
 -include doc.dep
 
-git.7: README
+cmds_txt = cmds-ancillaryinterrogators.txt \
+       cmds-ancillarymanipulators.txt \
+       cmds-mainporcelain.txt \
+       cmds-plumbinginterrogators.txt \
+       cmds-plumbingmanipulators.txt \
+       cmds-synchingrepositories.txt \
+       cmds-synchelpers.txt \
+       cmds-purehelpers.txt \
+       cmds-foreignscminterface.txt
 
-README: ../README
-       cp $< $@
+$(cmds_txt): cmd-list.perl $(MAN1_TXT)
+       perl ./cmd-list.perl
 
+git.7 git.html: git.txt core-intro.txt
 
 clean:
-       rm -f *.xml *.html *.1 *.7 howto-index.txt howto/*.html doc.dep README
+       rm -f *.xml *.html *.1 *.7 howto-index.txt howto/*.html doc.dep
+       rm -f $(cmds_txt)
 
 %.html : %.txt
-       asciidoc -b xhtml11 -d manpage -f asciidoc.conf $<
+       $(ASCIIDOC) -b xhtml11 -d manpage -f asciidoc.conf $(ASCIIDOC_EXTRA) $<
 
 %.1 %.7 : %.xml
        xmlto -m callouts.xsl man $<
 
 %.xml : %.txt
-       asciidoc -b docbook -d manpage -f asciidoc.conf $<
+       $(ASCIIDOC) -b docbook -d manpage -f asciidoc.conf $<
 
-git.html: git.txt README
+user-manual.xml: user-manual.txt user-manual.conf
+       $(ASCIIDOC) -b docbook -d book $<
+
+user-manual.html: user-manual.xml
+       xmlto html-nochunks $<
 
 glossary.html : glossary.txt sort_glossary.pl
        cat $< | \
        perl sort_glossary.pl | \
-       asciidoc -b xhtml11 - > glossary.html
+       $(ASCIIDOC) -b xhtml11 - > glossary.html
 
 howto-index.txt: howto-index.sh $(wildcard howto/*.txt)
        rm -f $@+ $@
@@ -102,13 +118,13 @@ howto-index.txt: howto-index.sh $(wildcard howto/*.txt)
        mv $@+ $@
 
 $(patsubst %,%.html,$(ARTICLES)) : %.html : %.txt
-       asciidoc -b xhtml11 $*.txt
+       $(ASCIIDOC) -b xhtml11 $*.txt
 
 WEBDOC_DEST = /pub/software/scm/git/docs
 
 $(patsubst %.txt,%.html,$(wildcard howto/*.txt)): %.html : %.txt
        rm -f $@+ $@
-       sed -e '1,/^$$/d' $< | asciidoc -b xhtml11 - >$@+
+       sed -e '1,/^$$/d' $< | $(ASCIIDOC) -b xhtml11 - >$@+
        mv $@+ $@
 
 install-webdoc : html
diff --git a/Documentation/RelNotes-1.5.0.txt b/Documentation/RelNotes-1.5.0.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..84e7eaf
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,468 @@
+GIT v1.5.0 Release Notes
+========================
+
+Old news
+--------
+
+This section is for people who are upgrading from ancient
+versions of git.  Although all of the changes in this section
+happened before the current v1.4.4 release, they are summarized
+here in the v1.5.0 release notes for people who skipped earlier
+versions.
+
+As of git v1.5.0 there are some optional features that changes
+the repository to allow data to be stored and transferred more
+efficiently.  These features are not enabled by default, as they
+will make the repository unusable with older versions of git.
+Specifically, the available options are:
+
+ - There is a configuration variable core.legacyheaders that
+   changes the format of loose objects so that they are more
+   efficient to pack and to send out of the repository over git
+   native protocol, since v1.4.2.  However, loose objects
+   written in the new format cannot be read by git older than
+   that version; people fetching from your repository using
+   older clients over dumb transports (e.g. http) using older
+   versions of git will also be affected.
+
+ - Since v1.4.3, configuration repack.usedeltabaseoffset allows
+   packfile to be created in more space efficient format, which
+   cannot be read by git older than that version.
+
+The above two are not enabled by default and you explicitly have
+to ask for them, because these two features make repositories
+unreadable by older versions of git, and in v1.5.0 we still do
+not enable them by default for the same reason.  We will change
+this default probably 1 year after 1.4.2's release, when it is
+reasonable to expect everybody to have new enough version of
+git.
+
+ - 'git pack-refs' appeared in v1.4.4; this command allows tags
+   to be accessed much more efficiently than the traditional
+   'one-file-per-tag' format.  Older git-native clients can
+   still fetch from a repository that packed and pruned refs
+   (the server side needs to run the up-to-date version of git),
+   but older dumb transports cannot.  Packing of refs is done by
+   an explicit user action, either by use of "git pack-refs
+   --prune" command or by use of "git gc" command.
+
+ - 'git -p' to paginate anything -- many commands do pagination
+   by default on a tty.  Introduced between v1.4.1 and v1.4.2;
+   this may surprise old timers.
+
+ - 'git archive' superseded 'git tar-tree' in v1.4.3;
+
+ - 'git cvsserver' was new invention in v1.3.0;
+
+ - 'git repo-config', 'git grep', 'git rebase' and 'gitk' were
+   seriously enhanced during v1.4.0 timeperiod.
+
+ - 'gitweb' became part of git.git during v1.4.0 timeperiod and
+   seriously modified since then.
+
+ - reflog is an v1.4.0 invention.  This allows you to name a
+   revision that a branch used to be at (e.g. "git diff
+   master@{yesterday} master" allows you to see changes since
+   yesterday's tip of the branch).
+
+
+Updates in v1.5.0 since v1.4.4 series
+-------------------------------------
+
+* Index manipulation
+
+ - git-add is to add contents to the index (aka "staging area"
+   for the next commit), whether the file the contents happen to
+   be is an existing one or a newly created one.
+
+ - git-add without any argument does not add everything
+   anymore.  Use 'git-add .' instead.  Also you can add
+   otherwise ignored files with an -f option.
+
+ - git-add tries to be more friendly to users by offering an
+   interactive mode ("git-add -i").
+
+ - git-commit <path> used to refuse to commit if <path> was
+   different between HEAD and the index (i.e. update-index was
+   used on it earlier).  This check was removed.
+
+ - git-rm is much saner and safer.  It is used to remove paths
+   from both the index file and the working tree, and makes sure
+   you are not losing any local modification before doing so.
+
+ - git-reset <tree> <paths>... can be used to revert index
+   entries for selected paths.
+
+ - git-update-index is much less visible.  Many suggestions to
+  use the command in git output and documentation have now been
+  replaced by simpler commands such as "git add" or "git rm".
+
+
+* Repository layout and objects transfer
+
+ - The data for origin repository is stored in the configuration
+   file $GIT_DIR/config, not in $GIT_DIR/remotes/, for newly
+   created clones.  The latter is still supported and there is
+   no need to convert your existing repository if you are
+   already comfortable with your workflow with the layout.
+
+ - git-clone always uses what is known as "separate remote"
+   layout for a newly created repository with a working tree.
+
+   A repository with the separate remote layout starts with only
+   one default branch, 'master', to be used for your own
+   development.  Unlike the traditional layout that copied all
+   the upstream branches into your branch namespace (while
+   renaming their 'master' to your 'origin'), the new layout
+   puts upstream branches into local "remote-tracking branches"
+   with their own namespace. These can be referenced with names
+   such as "origin/$upstream_branch_name" and are stored in
+   .git/refs/remotes rather than .git/refs/heads where normal
+   branches are stored.
+
+   This layout keeps your own branch namespace less cluttered,
+   avoids name collision with your upstream, makes it possible
+   to automatically track new branches created at the remote
+   after you clone from it, and makes it easier to interact with
+   more than one remote repository (you can use "git remote" to
+   add other repositories to track).  There might be some
+   surprises:
+
+   * 'git branch' does not show the remote tracking branches.
+     It only lists your own branches.  Use '-r' option to view
+     the tracking branches.
+
+   * If you are forking off of a branch obtained from the
+     upstream, you would have done something like 'git branch
+     my-next next', because traditional layout dropped the
+     tracking branch 'next' into your own branch namespace.
+     With the separate remote layout, you say 'git branch next
+     origin/next', which allows you to use the matching name
+     'next' for your own branch.  It also allows you to track a
+     remote other than 'origin' (i.e. where you initially cloned
+     from) and fork off of a branch from there the same way
+     (e.g. "git branch mingw j6t/master").
+
+   Repositories initialized with the traditional layout continue
+   to work.
+
+ - New branches that appear on the origin side after a clone is
+   made are also tracked automatically.  This is done with an
+   wildcard refspec "refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*", which
+   older git does not understand, so if you clone with 1.5.0,
+   you would need to downgrade remote.*.fetch in the
+   configuration file to specify each branch you are interested
+   in individually if you plan to fetch into the repository with
+   older versions of git (but why would you?).
+
+ - Similarly, wildcard refspec "refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/me/*"
+   can be given to "git-push" command to update the tracking
+   branches that is used to track the repository you are pushing
+   from on the remote side.
+
+ - git-branch and git-show-branch know remote tracking branches
+   (use the command line switch "-r" to list only tracked branches).
+
+ - git-push can now be used to delete a remote branch or a tag.
+   This requires the updated git on the remote side (use "git
+   push <remote> :refs/heads/<branch>" to delete "branch").
+
+ - git-push more aggressively keeps the transferred objects
+   packed.  Earlier we recommended to monitor amount of loose
+   objects and repack regularly, but you should repack when you
+   accumulated too many small packs this way as well.  Updated
+   git-count-objects helps you with this.
+
+ - git-fetch also more aggressively keeps the transferred objects
+   packed.  This behavior of git-push and git-fetch can be
+   tweaked with a single configuration transfer.unpacklimit (but
+   usually there should not be any need for a user to tweak it).
+
+ - A new command, git-remote, can help you manage your remote
+   tracking branch definitions.
+
+ - You may need to specify explicit paths for upload-pack and/or
+   receive-pack due to your ssh daemon configuration on the
+   other end.  This can now be done via remote.*.uploadpack and
+   remote.*.receivepack configuration.
+
+
+* Bare repositories
+
+ - Certain commands change their behavior in a bare repository
+   (i.e. a repository without associated working tree).  We use
+   a fairly conservative heuristic (if $GIT_DIR is ".git", or
+   ends with "/.git", the repository is not bare) to decide if a
+   repository is bare, but "core.bare" configuration variable
+   can be used to override the heuristic when it misidentifies
+   your repository.
+
+ - git-fetch used to complain updating the current branch but
+   this is now allowed for a bare repository.  So is the use of
+   'git-branch -f' to update the current branch.
+
+ - Porcelain-ish commands that require a working tree refuses to
+   work in a bare repository.
+
+
+* Reflog
+
+ - Reflog records the history from the view point of the local
+   repository. In other words, regardless of the real history,
+   the reflog shows the history as seen by one particular
+   repository (this enables you to ask "what was the current
+   revision in _this_ repository, yesterday at 1pm?").  This
+   facility is enabled by default for repositories with working
+   trees, and can be accessed with the "branch@{time}" and
+   "branch@{Nth}" notation.
+
+ - "git show-branch" learned showing the reflog data with the
+   new -g option.  "git log" has -s option to view reflog
+   entries in a more verbose manner.
+
+ - git-branch knows how to rename branches and moves existing
+   reflog data from the old branch to the new one.
+
+ - In addition to the reflog support in v1.4.4 series, HEAD
+   reference maintains its own log.  "HEAD@{5.minutes.ago}"
+   means the commit you were at 5 minutes ago, which takes
+   branch switching into account.  If you want to know where the
+   tip of your current branch was at 5 minutes ago, you need to
+   explicitly say its name (e.g. "master@{5.minutes.ago}") or
+   omit the refname altogether i.e. "@{5.minutes.ago}".
+
+ - The commits referred to by reflog entries are now protected
+   against pruning.  The new command "git reflog expire" can be
+   used to truncate older reflog entries and entries that refer
+   to commits that have been pruned away previously with older
+   versions of git.
+
+   Existing repositories that have been using reflog may get
+   complaints from fsck-objects and may not be able to run
+   git-repack, if you had run git-prune from older git; please
+   run "git reflog expire --stale-fix --all" first to remove
+   reflog entries that refer to commits that are no longer in
+   the repository when that happens.
+
+
+* Crufts removal
+
+ - We used to say "old commits are retrievable using reflog and
+   'master@{yesterday}' syntax as long as you haven't run
+   git-prune".  We no longer have to say the latter half of the
+   above sentence, as git-prune does not remove things reachable
+   from reflog entries.
+
+ - 'git-prune' by default does not remove _everything_
+   unreachable, as there is a one-day grace period built-in.
+
+ - There is a toplevel garbage collector script, 'git-gc', that
+   runs periodic cleanup functions, including 'git-repack -a -d',
+   'git-reflog expire', 'git-pack-refs --prune', and 'git-rerere
+   gc'.
+
+ - The output from fsck ("fsck-objects" is called just "fsck"
+   now, but the old name continues to work) was needlessly
+   alarming in that it warned missing objects that are reachable
+   only from dangling objects.  This has been corrected and the
+   output is much more useful.
+
+
+* Detached HEAD
+
+ - You can use 'git-checkout' to check out an arbitrary revision
+   or a tag as well, instead of named branches.  This will
+   dissociate your HEAD from the branch you are currently on.
+
+   A typical use of this feature is to "look around".  E.g.
+
+       $ git checkout v2.6.16
+       ... compile, test, etc.
+       $ git checkout v2.6.17
+       ... compile, test, etc.
+
+ - After detaching your HEAD, you can go back to an existing
+   branch with usual "git checkout $branch".  Also you can
+   start a new branch using "git checkout -b $newbranch" to
+   start a new branch at that commit.
+
+ - You can even pull from other repositories, make merges and
+   commits while your HEAD is detached.  Also you can use "git
+   reset" to jump to arbitrary commit, while still keeping your
+   HEAD detached.
+
+   Going back to attached state (i.e. on a particular branch) by
+   "git checkout $branch" can lose the current stat you arrived
+   in these ways, and "git checkout" refuses when the detached
+   HEAD is not pointed by any existing ref (an existing branch,
+   a remote tracking branch or a tag).  This safety can be
+   overridden with "git checkout -f $branch".
+
+
+* Packed refs
+
+ - Repositories with hundreds of tags have been paying large
+   overhead, both in storage and in runtime, due to the
+   traditional one-ref-per-file format.  A new command,
+   git-pack-refs, can be used to "pack" them in more efficient
+   representation (you can let git-gc do this for you).
+
+ - Clones and fetches over dumb transports are now aware of
+   packed refs and can download from repositories that use
+   them.
+
+
+* Configuration
+
+ - configuration related to color setting are consolidated under
+   color.* namespace (older diff.color.*, status.color.* are
+   still supported).
+
+ - 'git-repo-config' command is accessible as 'git-config' now.
+
+
+* Updated features
+
+ - git-describe uses better criteria to pick a base ref.  It
+   used to pick the one with the newest timestamp, but now it
+   picks the one that is topologically the closest (that is,
+   among ancestors of commit C, the ref T that has the shortest
+   output from "git-rev-list T..C" is chosen).
+
+ - git-describe gives the number of commits since the base ref
+   between the refname and the hash suffix.  E.g. the commit one
+   before v2.6.20-rc6 in the kernel repository is:
+
+       v2.6.20-rc5-306-ga21b069
+
+   which tells you that its object name begins with a21b069,
+   v2.6.20-rc5 is an ancestor of it (meaning, the commit
+   contains everything -rc5 has), and there are 306 commits
+   since v2.6.20-rc5.
+
+ - git-describe with --abbrev=0 can be used to show only the
+   name of the base ref.
+
+ - git-blame learned a new option, --incremental, that tells it
+   to output the blames as they are assigned.  A sample script
+   to use it is also included as contrib/blameview.
+
+ - git-blame starts annotating from the working tree by default.
+
+
+* Less external dependency
+
+ - We no longer require the "merge" program from the RCS suite.
+   All 3-way file-level merges are now done internally.
+
+ - The original implementation of git-merge-recursive which was
+   in Python has been removed; we have a C implementation of it
+   now.
+
+ - git-shortlog is no longer a Perl script.  It no longer
+   requires output piped from git-log; it can accept revision
+   parameters directly on the command line.
+
+
+* I18n
+
+ - We have always encouraged the commit message to be encoded in
+   UTF-8, but the users are allowed to use legacy encoding as
+   appropriate for their projects.  This will continue to be the
+   case.  However, a non UTF-8 commit encoding _must_ be
+   explicitly set with i18n.commitencoding in the repository
+   where a commit is made; otherwise git-commit-tree will
+   complain if the log message does not look like a valid UTF-8
+   string.
+
+ - The value of i18n.commitencoding in the originating
+   repository is recorded in the commit object on the "encoding"
+   header, if it is not UTF-8.  git-log and friends notice this,
+   and reencodes the message to the log output encoding when
+   displaying, if they are different.  The log output encoding
+   is determined by "git log --encoding=<encoding>",
+   i18n.logoutputencoding configuration, or i18n.commitencoding
+   configuration, in the decreasing order of preference, and
+   defaults to UTF-8.
+
+ - Tools for e-mailed patch application now default to -u
+   behavior; i.e. it always re-codes from the e-mailed encoding
+   to the encoding specified with i18n.commitencoding.  This
+   unfortunately forces projects that have happily been using a
+   legacy encoding without setting i18n.commitencoding to set
+   the configuration, but taken with other improvement, please
+   excuse us for this very minor one-time inconvenience.
+
+
+* e-mailed patches
+
+ - See the above I18n section.
+
+ - git-format-patch now enables --binary without being asked.
+   git-am does _not_ default to it, as sending binary patch via
+   e-mail is unusual and is harder to review than textual
+   patches and it is prudent to require the person who is
+   applying the patch to explicitly ask for it.
+
+ - The default suffix for git-format-patch output is now ".patch",
+   not ".txt".  This can be changed with --suffix=.txt option,
+   or setting the config variable "format.suffix" to ".txt".
+
+
+* Foreign SCM interfaces
+
+  - git-svn now requires the Perl SVN:: libraries, the
+    command-line backend was too slow and limited.
+
+  - the 'commit' subcommand of git-svn has been renamed to
+    'set-tree', and 'dcommit' is the recommended replacement for
+    day-to-day work.
+
+  - git fast-import backend.
+
+
+* User support
+
+ - Quite a lot of documentation updates.
+
+ - Bash completion scripts have been updated heavily.
+
+ - Better error messages for often used Porcelainish commands.
+
+ - Git GUI.  This is a simple Tk based graphical interface for
+   common Git operations.
+
+
+* Sliding mmap
+
+ - We used to assume that we can mmap the whole packfile while
+   in use, but with a large project this consumes huge virtual
+   memory space and truly huge ones would not fit in the
+   userland address space on 32-bit platforms.  We now mmap huge
+   packfile in pieces to avoid this problem.
+
+
+* Shallow clones
+
+ - There is a partial support for 'shallow' repositories that
+   keeps only recent history.  A 'shallow clone' is created by
+   specifying how deep that truncated history should be
+   (e.g. "git clone --depth=5 git://some.where/repo.git").
+
+   Currently a shallow repository has number of limitations:
+
+   - Cloning and fetching _from_ a shallow clone are not
+     supported (nor tested -- so they might work by accident but
+     they are not expected to).
+
+   - Pushing from nor into a shallow clone are not expected to
+     work.
+
+   - Merging inside a shallow repository would work as long as a
+     merge base is found in the recent history, but otherwise it
+     will be like merging unrelated histories and may result in
+     huge conflicts.
+
+   but this would be more than adequate for people who want to
+   look at near the tip of a big project with a deep history and
+   send patches in e-mail format.
index 646b6e7..285781d 100644 (file)
@@ -23,7 +23,8 @@ probably need to split up your commit to finer grained pieces.
 
 Oh, another thing.  I am picky about whitespaces.  Make sure your
 changes do not trigger errors with the sample pre-commit hook shipped
-in templates/hooks--pre-commit.
+in templates/hooks--pre-commit.  To help ensure this does not happen,
+run git diff --check on your changes before you commit.
 
 
 (2) Generate your patch using git tools out of your commits.
@@ -72,7 +73,9 @@ other than the commit message itself.  Place such "cover letter"
 material between the three dash lines and the diffstat.
 
 Do not attach the patch as a MIME attachment, compressed or not.
-Do not let your e-mail client send quoted-printable.  Many
+Do not let your e-mail client send quoted-printable.  Do not let
+your e-mail client send format=flowed which would destroy
+whitespaces in your patches. Many
 popular e-mail applications will not always transmit a MIME
 attachment as plain text, making it impossible to comment on
 your code.  A MIME attachment also takes a bit more time to
@@ -312,3 +315,35 @@ settings but I haven't tried, yet.
        mail.identity.default.compose_html      => false
        mail.identity.id?.compose_html          => false
 
+
+Gnus
+----
+
+'|' in the *Summary* buffer can be used to pipe the current
+message to an external program, and this is a handy way to drive
+"git am".  However, if the message is MIME encoded, what is
+piped into the program is the representation you see in your
+*Article* buffer after unwrapping MIME.  This is often not what
+you would want for two reasons.  It tends to screw up non ASCII
+characters (most notably in people's names), and also
+whitespaces (fatal in patches).  Running 'C-u g' to display the
+message in raw form before using '|' to run the pipe can work
+this problem around.
+
+
+KMail
+-----
+
+This should help you to submit patches inline using KMail.
+
+1) Prepare the patch as a text file.
+
+2) Click on New Mail.
+
+3) Go under "Options" in the Composer window and be sure that
+"Word wrap" is not set.
+
+4) Use Message -> Insert file... and insert the patch.
+
+5) Back in the compose window: add whatever other text you wish to the
+message, complete the addressing and subject fields, and press send.
diff --git a/Documentation/cmd-list.perl b/Documentation/cmd-list.perl
new file mode 100755 (executable)
index 0000000..d4fd72d
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,185 @@
+#
+
+sub format_one {
+       my ($out, $name) = @_;
+       my ($state, $description);
+       open I, '<', "$name.txt" or die "No such file $name.txt";
+       while (<I>) {
+               if (/^NAME$/) {
+                       $state = 1;
+                       next;
+               }
+               if ($state == 1 && /^----$/) {
+                       $state = 2;
+                       next;
+               }
+               next if ($state != 2);
+               chomp;
+               $description = $_;
+               last;
+       }
+       close I;
+       if (!defined $description) {
+               die "No description found in $name.txt";
+       }
+       if (my ($verify_name, $text) = ($description =~ /^($name) - (.*)/)) {
+               print $out "gitlink:$name\[1\]::\n";
+               print $out "\t$text.\n\n";
+       }
+       else {
+               die "Description does not match $name: $description";
+       }
+}
+
+my %cmds = ();
+while (<DATA>) {
+       next if /^#/;
+
+       chomp;
+       my ($name, $cat) = /^(\S+)\s+(.*)$/;
+       push @{$cmds{$cat}}, $name;
+}
+
+for my $cat (qw(ancillaryinterrogators
+               ancillarymanipulators
+               mainporcelain
+               plumbinginterrogators
+               plumbingmanipulators
+               synchingrepositories
+               foreignscminterface
+               purehelpers
+               synchelpers)) {
+       my $out = "cmds-$cat.txt";
+       open O, '>', "$out+" or die "Cannot open output file $out+";
+       for (@{$cmds{$cat}}) {
+               format_one(\*O, $_);
+       }
+       close O;
+       rename "$out+", "$out";
+}
+
+__DATA__
+git-add                                 mainporcelain
+git-am                                  mainporcelain
+git-annotate                            ancillaryinterrogators
+git-applymbox                           ancillaryinterrogators
+git-applypatch                          purehelpers
+git-apply                               plumbingmanipulators
+git-archimport                          foreignscminterface
+git-archive                             mainporcelain
+git-bisect                              mainporcelain
+git-blame                               ancillaryinterrogators
+git-branch                              mainporcelain
+git-cat-file                            plumbinginterrogators
+git-checkout-index                      plumbingmanipulators
+git-checkout                            mainporcelain
+git-check-ref-format                    purehelpers
+git-cherry                              ancillaryinterrogators
+git-cherry-pick                         mainporcelain
+git-clean                               mainporcelain
+git-clone                               mainporcelain
+git-commit                              mainporcelain
+git-commit-tree                         plumbingmanipulators
+git-convert-objects                     ancillarymanipulators
+git-count-objects                       ancillaryinterrogators
+git-cvsexportcommit                     foreignscminterface
+git-cvsimport                           foreignscminterface
+git-cvsserver                           foreignscminterface
+git-daemon                              synchingrepositories
+git-describe                            mainporcelain
+git-diff-files                          plumbinginterrogators
+git-diff-index                          plumbinginterrogators
+git-diff                                mainporcelain
+git-diff-tree                           plumbinginterrogators
+git-fast-import                                ancillarymanipulators
+git-fetch                               mainporcelain
+git-fetch-pack                          synchingrepositories
+git-fmt-merge-msg                       purehelpers
+git-for-each-ref                        plumbinginterrogators
+git-format-patch                        mainporcelain
+git-fsck                               ancillaryinterrogators
+git-gc                                  mainporcelain
+git-get-tar-commit-id                   ancillaryinterrogators
+git-grep                                mainporcelain
+git-hash-object                         plumbingmanipulators
+git-http-fetch                          synchelpers
+git-http-push                           synchelpers
+git-imap-send                           foreignscminterface
+git-index-pack                          plumbingmanipulators
+git-init                                mainporcelain
+git-instaweb                            ancillaryinterrogators
+gitk                                    mainporcelain
+git-local-fetch                         synchingrepositories
+git-log                                 mainporcelain
+git-lost-found                          ancillarymanipulators
+git-ls-files                            plumbinginterrogators
+git-ls-remote                           plumbinginterrogators
+git-ls-tree                             plumbinginterrogators
+git-mailinfo                            purehelpers
+git-mailsplit                           purehelpers
+git-merge-base                          plumbinginterrogators
+git-merge-file                          plumbingmanipulators
+git-merge-index                         plumbingmanipulators
+git-merge                               mainporcelain
+git-merge-one-file                      purehelpers
+git-merge-tree                          ancillaryinterrogators
+git-mktag                               plumbingmanipulators
+git-mktree                              plumbingmanipulators
+git-mv                                  mainporcelain
+git-name-rev                            plumbinginterrogators
+git-pack-objects                        plumbingmanipulators
+git-pack-redundant                      plumbinginterrogators
+git-pack-refs                           ancillarymanipulators
+git-parse-remote                        synchelpers
+git-patch-id                            purehelpers
+git-peek-remote                         purehelpers
+git-prune                               ancillarymanipulators
+git-prune-packed                        plumbingmanipulators
+git-pull                                mainporcelain
+git-push                                mainporcelain
+git-quiltimport                         foreignscminterface
+git-read-tree                           plumbingmanipulators
+git-rebase                              mainporcelain
+git-receive-pack                        synchelpers
+git-reflog                              ancillarymanipulators
+git-relink                              ancillarymanipulators
+git-repack                              ancillarymanipulators
+git-config                              ancillarymanipulators
+git-request-pull                        foreignscminterface
+git-rerere                              ancillaryinterrogators
+git-reset                               mainporcelain
+git-revert                              mainporcelain
+git-rev-list                            plumbinginterrogators
+git-rev-parse                           ancillaryinterrogators
+git-rm                                  mainporcelain
+git-runstatus                           ancillaryinterrogators
+git-send-email                          foreignscminterface
+git-send-pack                           synchingrepositories
+git-shell                               synchelpers
+git-shortlog                            mainporcelain
+git-show                                mainporcelain
+git-show-branch                         ancillaryinterrogators
+git-show-index                          plumbinginterrogators
+git-show-ref                            plumbinginterrogators
+git-sh-setup                            purehelpers
+git-ssh-fetch                           synchingrepositories
+git-ssh-upload                          synchingrepositories
+git-status                              mainporcelain
+git-stripspace                          purehelpers
+git-svn                                 foreignscminterface
+git-svnimport                           foreignscminterface
+git-symbolic-ref                        plumbingmanipulators
+git-tag                                 mainporcelain
+git-tar-tree                            plumbinginterrogators
+git-unpack-file                         plumbinginterrogators
+git-unpack-objects                      plumbingmanipulators
+git-update-index                        plumbingmanipulators
+git-update-ref                          plumbingmanipulators
+git-update-server-info                  synchingrepositories
+git-upload-archive                      synchelpers
+git-upload-pack                         synchelpers
+git-var                                 plumbinginterrogators
+git-verify-pack                         plumbinginterrogators
+git-verify-tag                          ancillaryinterrogators
+git-whatchanged                         ancillaryinterrogators
+git-write-tree                          plumbingmanipulators
index b4aae0d..3865535 100644 (file)
@@ -2,21 +2,84 @@ CONFIGURATION FILE
 ------------------
 
 The git configuration file contains a number of variables that affect
-the git command's behavior. They can be used by both the git plumbing
+the git command's behavior. `.git/config` file for each repository
+is used to store the information for that repository, and
+`$HOME/.gitconfig` is used to store per user information to give
+fallback values for `.git/config` file.
+
+They can be used by both the git plumbing
 and the porcelains. The variables are divided into sections, where
 in the fully qualified variable name the variable itself is the last
 dot-separated segment and the section name is everything before the last
 dot. The variable names are case-insensitive and only alphanumeric
 characters are allowed. Some variables may appear multiple times.
 
+Syntax
+~~~~~~
+
 The syntax is fairly flexible and permissive; whitespaces are mostly
-ignored. The '#' and ';' characters begin comments to the end of line,
-blank lines are ignored, lines containing strings enclosed in square
-brackets start sections and all the other lines are recognized
-as setting variables, in the form 'name = value'. If there is no equal
-sign on the line, the entire line is taken as 'name' and the variable
-is recognized as boolean "true". String values may be entirely or partially
-enclosed in double quotes; some variables may require special value format.
+ignored.  The '#' and ';' characters begin comments to the end of line,
+blank lines are ignored.
+
+The file consists of sections and variables.  A section begins with
+the name of the section in square brackets and continues until the next
+section begins.  Section names are not case sensitive.  Only alphanumeric
+characters, '`-`' and '`.`' are allowed in section names.  Each variable
+must belong to some section, which means that there must be section
+header before first setting of a variable.
+
+Sections can be further divided into subsections.  To begin a subsection
+put its name in double quotes, separated by space from the section name,
+in the section header, like in example below:
+
+--------
+       [section "subsection"]
+
+--------
+
+Subsection names can contain any characters except newline (doublequote
+'`"`' and backslash have to be escaped as '`\"`' and '`\\`',
+respectively) and are case sensitive.  Section header cannot span multiple
+lines.  Variables may belong directly to a section or to a given subsection.
+You can have `[section]` if you have `[section "subsection"]`, but you
+don't need to.
+
+There is also (case insensitive) alternative `[section.subsection]` syntax.
+In this syntax subsection names follow the same restrictions as for section
+name.
+
+All the other lines are recognized as setting variables, in the form
+'name = value'.  If there is no equal sign on the line, the entire line
+is taken as 'name' and the variable is recognized as boolean "true".
+The variable names are case-insensitive and only alphanumeric
+characters and '`-`' are allowed.  There can be more than one value
+for a given variable; we say then that variable is multivalued.
+
+Leading and trailing whitespace in a variable value is discarded.
+Internal whitespace within a variable value is retained verbatim.
+
+The values following the equals sign in variable assign are all either
+a string, an integer, or a boolean.  Boolean values may be given as yes/no,
+0/1 or true/false.  Case is not significant in boolean values, when
+converting value to the canonical form using '--bool' type specifier;
+`git-config` will ensure that the output is "true" or "false".
+
+String values may be entirely or partially enclosed in double quotes.
+You need to enclose variable value in double quotes if you want to
+preserve leading or trailing whitespace, or if variable value contains
+beginning of comment characters (if it contains '#' or ';').
+Double quote '`"`' and backslash '`\`' characters in variable value must
+be escaped: use '`\"`' for '`"`' and '`\\`' for '`\`'.
+
+The following escape sequences (beside '`\"`' and '`\\`') are recognized:
+'`\n`' for newline character (NL), '`\t`' for horizontal tabulation (HT, TAB)
+and '`\b`' for backspace (BS).  No other char escape sequence, nor octal
+char sequences are valid.
+
+Variable value ending in a '`\`' is continued on the next line in the
+customary UNIX fashion.
+
+Some variables may require special value format.
 
 Example
 ~~~~~~~
@@ -35,6 +98,10 @@ Example
                remote = origin
                merge = refs/heads/devel
 
+       # Proxy settings
+       [core]
+               gitProxy="ssh" for "ssh://kernel.org/"
+               gitProxy=default-proxy ; for the rest
 
 Variables
 ~~~~~~~~~
@@ -100,7 +167,7 @@ core.sharedRepository::
        group-writable). When 'all' (or 'world' or 'everybody'), the
        repository will be readable by all users, additionally to being
        group-shareable. When 'umask' (or 'false'), git will use permissions
-       reported by umask(2). See gitlink:git-init-db[1]. False by default.
+       reported by umask(2). See gitlink:git-init[1]. False by default.
 
 core.warnAmbiguousRefs::
        If true, git will warn you if the ref name you passed it is ambiguous
@@ -155,6 +222,12 @@ alias.*::
        spaces, the usual shell quoting and escaping is supported.
        quote pair and a backslash can be used to quote them.
 
+       If the alias expansion is prefixed with an exclamation point,
+       it will be treated as a shell command.  For example, defining
+       "alias.new = !gitk --all --not ORIG_HEAD", the invocation
+       "git new" is equivalent to running the shell command
+       "gitk --all --not ORIG_HEAD".
+
 apply.whitespace::
        Tells `git-apply` how to handle whitespaces, in the same way
        as the '--whitespace' option. See gitlink:git-apply[1].
@@ -183,10 +256,15 @@ color.branch.<slot>::
        Use customized color for branch coloration. `<slot>` is one of
        `current` (the current branch), `local` (a local branch),
        `remote` (a tracking branch in refs/remotes/), `plain` (other
-       refs), or `reset` (the normal terminal color).  The value for
-       these configuration variables can be one of: `normal`, `bold`,
-       `dim`, `ul`, `blink`, `reverse`, `reset`, `black`, `red`,
-       `green`, `yellow`, `blue`, `magenta`, `cyan`, or `white`.
+       refs).
++
+The value for these configuration variables is a list of colors (at most
+two) and attributes (at most one), separated by spaces.  The colors
+accepted are `normal`, `black`, `red`, `green`, `yellow`, `blue`,
+`magenta`, `cyan` and `white`; the attributes are `bold`, `dim`, `ul`,
+`blink` and `reverse`.  The first color given is the foreground; the
+second is the background.  The position of the attribute, if any,
+doesn't matter.
 
 color.diff::
        When true (or `always`), always use colors in patch.
@@ -194,12 +272,13 @@ color.diff::
        colors only when the output is to the terminal.
 
 color.diff.<slot>::
-       Use customized color for diff colorization.  `<slot>`
-       specifies which part of the patch to use the specified
-       color, and is one of `plain` (context text), `meta`
-       (metainformation), `frag` (hunk header), `old` (removed
-       lines), or `new` (added lines).  The values of these
-       variables may be specified as in color.branch.<slot>.
+       Use customized color for diff colorization.  `<slot>` specifies
+       which part of the patch to use the specified color, and is one
+       of `plain` (context text), `meta` (metainformation), `frag`
+       (hunk header), `old` (removed lines), `new` (added lines),
+       `commit` (commit headers), or `whitespace` (highlighting dubious
+       whitespace).  The values of these variables may be specified as
+       in color.branch.<slot>.
 
 color.pager::
        A boolean to enable/disable colored output when the pager is in
@@ -228,10 +307,31 @@ diff.renames::
        will enable basic rename detection.  If set to "copies" or
        "copy", it will detect copies, as well.
 
+fetch.unpackLimit::
+       If the number of objects fetched over the git native
+       transfer is below this
+       limit, then the objects will be unpacked into loose object
+       files. However if the number of received objects equals or
+       exceeds this limit then the received pack will be stored as
+       a pack, after adding any missing delta bases.  Storing the
+       pack from a push can make the push operation complete faster,
+       especially on slow filesystems.
+
 format.headers::
        Additional email headers to include in a patch to be submitted
        by mail.  See gitlink:git-format-patch[1].
 
+gc.packrefs::
+       `git gc` does not run `git pack-refs` in a bare repository by
+       default so that older dumb-transport clients can still fetch
+       from the repository.  Setting this to `true` lets `git
+       gc` to run `git pack-refs`.  Setting this to `false` tells
+       `git gc` never to run `git pack-refs`. The default setting is
+       `notbare`. Enable it only when you know you do not have to
+       support such clients.  The default setting will change to `true`
+       at some stage, and setting this to `false` will continue to
+       prevent `git pack-refs` from being run from `git gc`.
+
 gc.reflogexpire::
        `git reflog expire` removes reflog entries older than
        this time; defaults to 90 days.
@@ -321,6 +421,13 @@ merge.summary::
        Whether to include summaries of merged commits in newly created
        merge commit messages. False by default.
 
+merge.verbosity::
+       Controls the amount of output shown by the recursive merge
+       strategy.  Level 0 outputs nothing except a final error
+       message if conflicts were detected. Level 1 outputs only
+       conflicts, 2 outputs conflicts and file changes.  Level 5 and
+       above outputs debugging information.  The default is level 2.
+
 pack.window::
        The size of the window used by gitlink:git-pack-objects[1] when no
        window size is given on the command line. Defaults to 10.
@@ -344,6 +451,14 @@ remote.<name>.push::
        The default set of "refspec" for gitlink:git-push[1]. See
        gitlink:git-push[1].
 
+remote.<name>.receivepack::
+       The default program to execute on the remote side when pushing.  See
+       option \--exec of gitlink:git-push[1].
+
+remote.<name>.uploadpack::
+       The default program to execute on the remote side when fetching.  See
+       option \--exec of gitlink:git-fetch-pack[1].
+
 repack.usedeltabaseoffset::
        Allow gitlink:git-repack[1] to create packs that uses
        delta-base offset.  Defaults to false.
@@ -377,6 +492,13 @@ user.name::
        Can be overridden by the 'GIT_AUTHOR_NAME' and 'GIT_COMMITTER_NAME'
        environment variables.  See gitlink:git-commit-tree[1].
 
+user.signingkey::
+       If gitlink:git-tag[1] is not selecting the key you want it to
+       automatically when creating a signed tag, you can override the
+       default selection with this variable.  This option is passed
+       unchanged to gpg's --local-user parameter, so you may specify a key
+       using any method that gpg supports.
+
 whatchanged.difftree::
        The default gitlink:git-diff-tree[1] arguments to be used
        for gitlink:git-whatchanged[1].
@@ -400,3 +522,8 @@ receive.denyNonFastForwards::
        even if that push is forced. This configuration variable is
        set when initializing a shared repository.
 
+transfer.unpackLimit::
+       When `fetch.unpackLimit` or `receive.unpackLimit` are
+       not set, the value of this variable is used instead.
+
+
diff --git a/Documentation/core-intro.txt b/Documentation/core-intro.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..24b060b
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,591 @@
+////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
+
+       GIT - the stupid content tracker
+
+////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
+
+"git" can mean anything, depending on your mood.
+
+ - random three-letter combination that is pronounceable, and not
+   actually used by any common UNIX command.  The fact that it is a
+   mispronunciation of "get" may or may not be relevant.
+ - stupid. contemptible and despicable. simple. Take your pick from the
+   dictionary of slang.
+ - "global information tracker": you're in a good mood, and it actually
+   works for you. Angels sing, and a light suddenly fills the room.
+ - "goddamn idiotic truckload of sh*t": when it breaks
+
+This is a (not so) stupid but extremely fast directory content manager.
+It doesn't do a whole lot at its core, but what it 'does' do is track
+directory contents efficiently.
+
+There are two object abstractions: the "object database", and the
+"current directory cache" aka "index".
+
+The Object Database
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+The object database is literally just a content-addressable collection
+of objects.  All objects are named by their content, which is
+approximated by the SHA1 hash of the object itself.  Objects may refer
+to other objects (by referencing their SHA1 hash), and so you can
+build up a hierarchy of objects.
+
+All objects have a statically determined "type" aka "tag", which is
+determined at object creation time, and which identifies the format of
+the object (i.e. how it is used, and how it can refer to other
+objects).  There are currently four different object types: "blob",
+"tree", "commit" and "tag".
+
+A "blob" object cannot refer to any other object, and is, like the type
+implies, a pure storage object containing some user data.  It is used to
+actually store the file data, i.e. a blob object is associated with some
+particular version of some file.
+
+A "tree" object is an object that ties one or more "blob" objects into a
+directory structure. In addition, a tree object can refer to other tree
+objects, thus creating a directory hierarchy.
+
+A "commit" object ties such directory hierarchies together into
+a DAG of revisions - each "commit" is associated with exactly one tree
+(the directory hierarchy at the time of the commit). In addition, a
+"commit" refers to one or more "parent" commit objects that describe the
+history of how we arrived at that directory hierarchy.
+
+As a special case, a commit object with no parents is called the "root"
+object, and is the point of an initial project commit.  Each project
+must have at least one root, and while you can tie several different
+root objects together into one project by creating a commit object which
+has two or more separate roots as its ultimate parents, that's probably
+just going to confuse people.  So aim for the notion of "one root object
+per project", even if git itself does not enforce that.
+
+A "tag" object symbolically identifies and can be used to sign other
+objects. It contains the identifier and type of another object, a
+symbolic name (of course!) and, optionally, a signature.
+
+Regardless of object type, all objects share the following
+characteristics: they are all deflated with zlib, and have a header
+that not only specifies their type, but also provides size information
+about the data in the object.  It's worth noting that the SHA1 hash
+that is used to name the object is the hash of the original data
+plus this header, so `sha1sum` 'file' does not match the object name
+for 'file'.
+(Historical note: in the dawn of the age of git the hash
+was the sha1 of the 'compressed' object.)
+
+As a result, the general consistency of an object can always be tested
+independently of the contents or the type of the object: all objects can
+be validated by verifying that (a) their hashes match the content of the
+file and (b) the object successfully inflates to a stream of bytes that
+forms a sequence of <ascii type without space> + <space> + <ascii decimal
+size> + <byte\0> + <binary object data>.
+
+The structured objects can further have their structure and
+connectivity to other objects verified. This is generally done with
+the `git-fsck` program, which generates a full dependency graph
+of all objects, and verifies their internal consistency (in addition
+to just verifying their superficial consistency through the hash).
+
+The object types in some more detail:
+
+Blob Object
+~~~~~~~~~~~
+A "blob" object is nothing but a binary blob of data, and doesn't
+refer to anything else.  There is no signature or any other
+verification of the data, so while the object is consistent (it 'is'
+indexed by its sha1 hash, so the data itself is certainly correct), it
+has absolutely no other attributes.  No name associations, no
+permissions.  It is purely a blob of data (i.e. normally "file
+contents").
+
+In particular, since the blob is entirely defined by its data, if two
+files in a directory tree (or in multiple different versions of the
+repository) have the same contents, they will share the same blob
+object. The object is totally independent of its location in the
+directory tree, and renaming a file does not change the object that
+file is associated with in any way.
+
+A blob is typically created when gitlink:git-update-index[1]
+is run, and its data can be accessed by gitlink:git-cat-file[1].
+
+Tree Object
+~~~~~~~~~~~
+The next hierarchical object type is the "tree" object.  A tree object
+is a list of mode/name/blob data, sorted by name.  Alternatively, the
+mode data may specify a directory mode, in which case instead of
+naming a blob, that name is associated with another TREE object.
+
+Like the "blob" object, a tree object is uniquely determined by the
+set contents, and so two separate but identical trees will always
+share the exact same object. This is true at all levels, i.e. it's
+true for a "leaf" tree (which does not refer to any other trees, only
+blobs) as well as for a whole subdirectory.
+
+For that reason a "tree" object is just a pure data abstraction: it
+has no history, no signatures, no verification of validity, except
+that since the contents are again protected by the hash itself, we can
+trust that the tree is immutable and its contents never change.
+
+So you can trust the contents of a tree to be valid, the same way you
+can trust the contents of a blob, but you don't know where those
+contents 'came' from.
+
+Side note on trees: since a "tree" object is a sorted list of
+"filename+content", you can create a diff between two trees without
+actually having to unpack two trees.  Just ignore all common parts,
+and your diff will look right.  In other words, you can effectively
+(and efficiently) tell the difference between any two random trees by
+O(n) where "n" is the size of the difference, rather than the size of
+the tree.
+
+Side note 2 on trees: since the name of a "blob" depends entirely and
+exclusively on its contents (i.e. there are no names or permissions
+involved), you can see trivial renames or permission changes by
+noticing that the blob stayed the same.  However, renames with data
+changes need a smarter "diff" implementation.
+
+A tree is created with gitlink:git-write-tree[1] and
+its data can be accessed by gitlink:git-ls-tree[1].
+Two trees can be compared with gitlink:git-diff-tree[1].
+
+Commit Object
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+The "commit" object is an object that introduces the notion of
+history into the picture.  In contrast to the other objects, it
+doesn't just describe the physical state of a tree, it describes how
+we got there, and why.
+
+A "commit" is defined by the tree-object that it results in, the
+parent commits (zero, one or more) that led up to that point, and a
+comment on what happened.  Again, a commit is not trusted per se:
+the contents are well-defined and "safe" due to the cryptographically
+strong signatures at all levels, but there is no reason to believe
+that the tree is "good" or that the merge information makes sense.
+The parents do not have to actually have any relationship with the
+result, for example.
+
+Note on commits: unlike real SCM's, commits do not contain
+rename information or file mode change information.  All of that is
+implicit in the trees involved (the result tree, and the result trees
+of the parents), and describing that makes no sense in this idiotic
+file manager.
+
+A commit is created with gitlink:git-commit-tree[1] and
+its data can be accessed by gitlink:git-cat-file[1].
+
+Trust
+~~~~~
+An aside on the notion of "trust". Trust is really outside the scope
+of "git", but it's worth noting a few things.  First off, since
+everything is hashed with SHA1, you 'can' trust that an object is
+intact and has not been messed with by external sources.  So the name
+of an object uniquely identifies a known state - just not a state that
+you may want to trust.
+
+Furthermore, since the SHA1 signature of a commit refers to the
+SHA1 signatures of the tree it is associated with and the signatures
+of the parent, a single named commit specifies uniquely a whole set
+of history, with full contents.  You can't later fake any step of the
+way once you have the name of a commit.
+
+So to introduce some real trust in the system, the only thing you need
+to do is to digitally sign just 'one' special note, which includes the
+name of a top-level commit.  Your digital signature shows others
+that you trust that commit, and the immutability of the history of
+commits tells others that they can trust the whole history.
+
+In other words, you can easily validate a whole archive by just
+sending out a single email that tells the people the name (SHA1 hash)
+of the top commit, and digitally sign that email using something
+like GPG/PGP.
+
+To assist in this, git also provides the tag object...
+
+Tag Object
+~~~~~~~~~~
+Git provides the "tag" object to simplify creating, managing and
+exchanging symbolic and signed tokens.  The "tag" object at its
+simplest simply symbolically identifies another object by containing
+the sha1, type and symbolic name.
+
+However it can optionally contain additional signature information
+(which git doesn't care about as long as there's less than 8k of
+it). This can then be verified externally to git.
+
+Note that despite the tag features, "git" itself only handles content
+integrity; the trust framework (and signature provision and
+verification) has to come from outside.
+
+A tag is created with gitlink:git-mktag[1],
+its data can be accessed by gitlink:git-cat-file[1],
+and the signature can be verified by
+gitlink:git-verify-tag[1].
+
+
+The "index" aka "Current Directory Cache"
+-----------------------------------------
+The index is a simple binary file, which contains an efficient
+representation of a virtual directory content at some random time.  It
+does so by a simple array that associates a set of names, dates,
+permissions and content (aka "blob") objects together.  The cache is
+always kept ordered by name, and names are unique (with a few very
+specific rules) at any point in time, but the cache has no long-term
+meaning, and can be partially updated at any time.
+
+In particular, the index certainly does not need to be consistent with
+the current directory contents (in fact, most operations will depend on
+different ways to make the index 'not' be consistent with the directory
+hierarchy), but it has three very important attributes:
+
+'(a) it can re-generate the full state it caches (not just the
+directory structure: it contains pointers to the "blob" objects so
+that it can regenerate the data too)'
+
+As a special case, there is a clear and unambiguous one-way mapping
+from a current directory cache to a "tree object", which can be
+efficiently created from just the current directory cache without
+actually looking at any other data.  So a directory cache at any one
+time uniquely specifies one and only one "tree" object (but has
+additional data to make it easy to match up that tree object with what
+has happened in the directory)
+
+'(b) it has efficient methods for finding inconsistencies between that
+cached state ("tree object waiting to be instantiated") and the
+current state.'
+
+'(c) it can additionally efficiently represent information about merge
+conflicts between different tree objects, allowing each pathname to be
+associated with sufficient information about the trees involved that
+you can create a three-way merge between them.'
+
+Those are the three ONLY things that the directory cache does.  It's a
+cache, and the normal operation is to re-generate it completely from a
+known tree object, or update/compare it with a live tree that is being
+developed.  If you blow the directory cache away entirely, you generally
+haven't lost any information as long as you have the name of the tree
+that it described.
+
+At the same time, the index is at the same time also the
+staging area for creating new trees, and creating a new tree always
+involves a controlled modification of the index file.  In particular,
+the index file can have the representation of an intermediate tree that
+has not yet been instantiated.  So the index can be thought of as a
+write-back cache, which can contain dirty information that has not yet
+been written back to the backing store.
+
+
+
+The Workflow
+------------
+Generally, all "git" operations work on the index file. Some operations
+work *purely* on the index file (showing the current state of the
+index), but most operations move data to and from the index file. Either
+from the database or from the working directory. Thus there are four
+main combinations:
+
+1) working directory -> index
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+You update the index with information from the working directory with
+the gitlink:git-update-index[1] command.  You
+generally update the index information by just specifying the filename
+you want to update, like so:
+
+       git-update-index filename
+
+but to avoid common mistakes with filename globbing etc, the command
+will not normally add totally new entries or remove old entries,
+i.e. it will normally just update existing cache entries.
+
+To tell git that yes, you really do realize that certain files no
+longer exist, or that new files should be added, you
+should use the `--remove` and `--add` flags respectively.
+
+NOTE! A `--remove` flag does 'not' mean that subsequent filenames will
+necessarily be removed: if the files still exist in your directory
+structure, the index will be updated with their new status, not
+removed. The only thing `--remove` means is that update-cache will be
+considering a removed file to be a valid thing, and if the file really
+does not exist any more, it will update the index accordingly.
+
+As a special case, you can also do `git-update-index --refresh`, which
+will refresh the "stat" information of each index to match the current
+stat information. It will 'not' update the object status itself, and
+it will only update the fields that are used to quickly test whether
+an object still matches its old backing store object.
+
+2) index -> object database
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+You write your current index file to a "tree" object with the program
+
+       git-write-tree
+
+that doesn't come with any options - it will just write out the
+current index into the set of tree objects that describe that state,
+and it will return the name of the resulting top-level tree. You can
+use that tree to re-generate the index at any time by going in the
+other direction:
+
+3) object database -> index
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+You read a "tree" file from the object database, and use that to
+populate (and overwrite - don't do this if your index contains any
+unsaved state that you might want to restore later!) your current
+index.  Normal operation is just
+
+               git-read-tree <sha1 of tree>
+
+and your index file will now be equivalent to the tree that you saved
+earlier. However, that is only your 'index' file: your working
+directory contents have not been modified.
+
+4) index -> working directory
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+You update your working directory from the index by "checking out"
+files. This is not a very common operation, since normally you'd just
+keep your files updated, and rather than write to your working
+directory, you'd tell the index files about the changes in your
+working directory (i.e. `git-update-index`).
+
+However, if you decide to jump to a new version, or check out somebody
+else's version, or just restore a previous tree, you'd populate your
+index file with read-tree, and then you need to check out the result
+with
+
+               git-checkout-index filename
+
+or, if you want to check out all of the index, use `-a`.
+
+NOTE! git-checkout-index normally refuses to overwrite old files, so
+if you have an old version of the tree already checked out, you will
+need to use the "-f" flag ('before' the "-a" flag or the filename) to
+'force' the checkout.
+
+
+Finally, there are a few odds and ends which are not purely moving
+from one representation to the other:
+
+5) Tying it all together
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+To commit a tree you have instantiated with "git-write-tree", you'd
+create a "commit" object that refers to that tree and the history
+behind it - most notably the "parent" commits that preceded it in
+history.
+
+Normally a "commit" has one parent: the previous state of the tree
+before a certain change was made. However, sometimes it can have two
+or more parent commits, in which case we call it a "merge", due to the
+fact that such a commit brings together ("merges") two or more
+previous states represented by other commits.
+
+In other words, while a "tree" represents a particular directory state
+of a working directory, a "commit" represents that state in "time",
+and explains how we got there.
+
+You create a commit object by giving it the tree that describes the
+state at the time of the commit, and a list of parents:
+
+       git-commit-tree <tree> -p <parent> [-p <parent2> ..]
+
+and then giving the reason for the commit on stdin (either through
+redirection from a pipe or file, or by just typing it at the tty).
+
+git-commit-tree will return the name of the object that represents
+that commit, and you should save it away for later use. Normally,
+you'd commit a new `HEAD` state, and while git doesn't care where you
+save the note about that state, in practice we tend to just write the
+result to the file pointed at by `.git/HEAD`, so that we can always see
+what the last committed state was.
+
+Here is an ASCII art by Jon Loeliger that illustrates how
+various pieces fit together.
+
+------------
+
+                     commit-tree
+                      commit obj
+                       +----+
+                       |    |
+                       |    |
+                       V    V
+                    +-----------+
+                    | Object DB |
+                    |  Backing  |
+                    |   Store   |
+                    +-----------+
+                       ^
+           write-tree  |     |
+             tree obj  |     |
+                       |     |  read-tree
+                       |     |  tree obj
+                             V
+                    +-----------+
+                    |   Index   |
+                    |  "cache"  |
+                    +-----------+
+         update-index  ^
+             blob obj  |     |
+                       |     |
+    checkout-index -u  |     |  checkout-index
+             stat      |     |  blob obj
+                             V
+                    +-----------+
+                    |  Working  |
+                    | Directory |
+                    +-----------+
+
+------------
+
+
+6) Examining the data
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+You can examine the data represented in the object database and the
+index with various helper tools. For every object, you can use
+gitlink:git-cat-file[1] to examine details about the
+object:
+
+               git-cat-file -t <objectname>
+
+shows the type of the object, and once you have the type (which is
+usually implicit in where you find the object), you can use
+
+               git-cat-file blob|tree|commit|tag <objectname>
+
+to show its contents. NOTE! Trees have binary content, and as a result
+there is a special helper for showing that content, called
+`git-ls-tree`, which turns the binary content into a more easily
+readable form.
+
+It's especially instructive to look at "commit" objects, since those
+tend to be small and fairly self-explanatory. In particular, if you
+follow the convention of having the top commit name in `.git/HEAD`,
+you can do
+
+               git-cat-file commit HEAD
+
+to see what the top commit was.
+
+7) Merging multiple trees
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+Git helps you do a three-way merge, which you can expand to n-way by
+repeating the merge procedure arbitrary times until you finally
+"commit" the state.  The normal situation is that you'd only do one
+three-way merge (two parents), and commit it, but if you like to, you
+can do multiple parents in one go.
+
+To do a three-way merge, you need the two sets of "commit" objects
+that you want to merge, use those to find the closest common parent (a
+third "commit" object), and then use those commit objects to find the
+state of the directory ("tree" object) at these points.
+
+To get the "base" for the merge, you first look up the common parent
+of two commits with
+
+               git-merge-base <commit1> <commit2>
+
+which will return you the commit they are both based on.  You should
+now look up the "tree" objects of those commits, which you can easily
+do with (for example)
+
+               git-cat-file commit <commitname> | head -1
+
+since the tree object information is always the first line in a commit
+object.
+
+Once you know the three trees you are going to merge (the one
+"original" tree, aka the common case, and the two "result" trees, aka
+the branches you want to merge), you do a "merge" read into the
+index. This will complain if it has to throw away your old index contents, so you should
+make sure that you've committed those - in fact you would normally
+always do a merge against your last commit (which should thus match
+what you have in your current index anyway).
+
+To do the merge, do
+
+               git-read-tree -m -u <origtree> <yourtree> <targettree>
+
+which will do all trivial merge operations for you directly in the
+index file, and you can just write the result out with
+`git-write-tree`.
+
+Historical note.  We did not have `-u` facility when this
+section was first written, so we used to warn that
+the merge is done in the index file, not in your
+working tree, and your working tree will not match your
+index after this step.
+This is no longer true.  The above command, thanks to `-u`
+option, updates your working tree with the merge results for
+paths that have been trivially merged.
+
+
+8) Merging multiple trees, continued
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+Sadly, many merges aren't trivial. If there are files that have
+been added.moved or removed, or if both branches have modified the
+same file, you will be left with an index tree that contains "merge
+entries" in it. Such an index tree can 'NOT' be written out to a tree
+object, and you will have to resolve any such merge clashes using
+other tools before you can write out the result.
+
+You can examine such index state with `git-ls-files --unmerged`
+command.  An example:
+
+------------------------------------------------
+$ git-read-tree -m $orig HEAD $target
+$ git-ls-files --unmerged
+100644 263414f423d0e4d70dae8fe53fa34614ff3e2860 1      hello.c
+100644 06fa6a24256dc7e560efa5687fa84b51f0263c3a 2      hello.c
+100644 cc44c73eb783565da5831b4d820c962954019b69 3      hello.c
+------------------------------------------------
+
+Each line of the `git-ls-files --unmerged` output begins with
+the blob mode bits, blob SHA1, 'stage number', and the
+filename.  The 'stage number' is git's way to say which tree it
+came from: stage 1 corresponds to `$orig` tree, stage 2 `HEAD`
+tree, and stage3 `$target` tree.
+
+Earlier we said that trivial merges are done inside
+`git-read-tree -m`.  For example, if the file did not change
+from `$orig` to `HEAD` nor `$target`, or if the file changed
+from `$orig` to `HEAD` and `$orig` to `$target` the same way,
+obviously the final outcome is what is in `HEAD`.  What the
+above example shows is that file `hello.c` was changed from
+`$orig` to `HEAD` and `$orig` to `$target` in a different way.
+You could resolve this by running your favorite 3-way merge
+program, e.g.  `diff3` or `merge`, on the blob objects from
+these three stages yourself, like this:
+
+------------------------------------------------
+$ git-cat-file blob 263414f... >hello.c~1
+$ git-cat-file blob 06fa6a2... >hello.c~2
+$ git-cat-file blob cc44c73... >hello.c~3
+$ merge hello.c~2 hello.c~1 hello.c~3
+------------------------------------------------
+
+This would leave the merge result in `hello.c~2` file, along
+with conflict markers if there are conflicts.  After verifying
+the merge result makes sense, you can tell git what the final
+merge result for this file is by:
+
+       mv -f hello.c~2 hello.c
+       git-update-index hello.c
+
+When a path is in unmerged state, running `git-update-index` for
+that path tells git to mark the path resolved.
+
+The above is the description of a git merge at the lowest level,
+to help you understand what conceptually happens under the hood.
+In practice, nobody, not even git itself, uses three `git-cat-file`
+for this.  There is `git-merge-index` program that extracts the
+stages to temporary files and calls a "merge" script on it:
+
+       git-merge-index git-merge-one-file hello.c
+
+and that is what higher level `git merge -s resolve` is implemented
+with.
index 5ea6117..97cdb90 100644 (file)
@@ -46,12 +46,12 @@ to import into git.
 For our first example, we're going to start a totally new repository from
 scratch, with no pre-existing files, and we'll call it `git-tutorial`.
 To start up, create a subdirectory for it, change into that
-subdirectory, and initialize the git infrastructure with `git-init-db`:
+subdirectory, and initialize the git infrastructure with `git-init`:
 
 ------------------------------------------------
 $ mkdir git-tutorial
 $ cd git-tutorial
-$ git-init-db
+$ git-init
 ------------------------------------------------
 
 to which git will reply
@@ -624,7 +624,7 @@ name for the state at that point.
 Copying repositories
 --------------------
 
-git repositories are normally totally self-sufficient and relocatable
+git repositories are normally totally self-sufficient and relocatable.
 Unlike CVS, for example, there is no separate notion of
 "repository" and "working tree". A git repository normally *is* the
 working tree, with the local git information hidden in the `.git`
@@ -906,18 +906,13 @@ of it as it can automatically (which in this case is just merge the `example`
 file, which had no differences in the `mybranch` branch), and say:
 
 ----------------
-       Trying really trivial in-index merge...
-       fatal: Merge requires file-level merging
-       Nope.
-       ...
        Auto-merging hello 
        CONFLICT (content): Merge conflict in hello 
        Automatic merge failed; fix up by hand
 ----------------
 
-which is way too verbose, but it basically tells you that it failed the
-really trivial merge ("Simple merge") and did an "Automatic merge"
-instead, but that too failed due to conflicts in `hello`.
+It tells you that it did an "Automatic merge", which
+failed due to conflicts in `hello`.
 
 Not to worry. It left the (trivial) conflict in `hello` in the same form you
 should already be well used to if you've ever used CVS, so let's just
@@ -982,7 +977,7 @@ see more complex cases.
 Now, let's pretend you are the one who did all the work in
 `mybranch`, and the fruit of your hard work has finally been merged
 to the `master` branch. Let's go back to `mybranch`, and run
-resolve to get the "upstream changes" back to your branch.
+`git merge` to get the "upstream changes" back to your branch.
 
 ------------
 $ git checkout mybranch
@@ -1001,7 +996,7 @@ Fast forward
 ----------------
 
 Because your branch did not contain anything more than what are
-already merged into the `master` branch, the resolve operation did
+already merged into the `master` branch, the merge operation did
 not actually do a merge. Instead, it just updated the top of
 the tree of your branch to that of the `master` branch. This is
 often called 'fast forward' merge.
@@ -1104,11 +1099,11 @@ programs, which are 'commit walkers'; they outlived their
 usefulness when git Native and SSH transports were introduced,
 and not used by `git pull` or `git push` scripts.
 
-Once you fetch from the remote repository, you `resolve` that
+Once you fetch from the remote repository, you `merge` that
 with your current branch.
 
 However -- it's such a common thing to `fetch` and then
-immediately `resolve`, that it's called `git pull`, and you can
+immediately `merge`, that it's called `git pull`, and you can
 simply do
 
 ----------------
@@ -1123,52 +1118,32 @@ You could do without using any branches at all, by
 keeping as many local repositories as you would like to have
 branches, and merging between them with `git pull`, just like
 you merge between branches. The advantage of this approach is
-that it lets you keep set of files for each `branch` checked
+that it lets you keep set of files for each `branch` checked
 out and you may find it easier to switch back and forth if you
 juggle multiple lines of development simultaneously. Of
 course, you will pay the price of more disk usage to hold
 multiple working trees, but disk space is cheap these days.
 
-[NOTE]
-You could even pull from your own repository by
-giving '.' as <remote-repository> parameter to `git pull`.  This
-is useful when you want to merge a local branch (or more, if you
-are making an Octopus) into the current branch.
-
 It is likely that you will be pulling from the same remote
 repository from time to time. As a short hand, you can store
-the remote repository URL in a file under .git/remotes/
-directory, like this:
-
-------------------------------------------------
-$ mkdir -p .git/remotes/
-$ cat >.git/remotes/linus <<\EOF
-URL: http://www.kernel.org/pub/scm/git/git.git/
-EOF
-------------------------------------------------
-
-and use the filename to `git pull` instead of the full URL.
-The URL specified in such file can even be a prefix
-of a full URL, like this:
+the remote repository URL in the local repository's config file
+like this:
 
 ------------------------------------------------
-$ cat >.git/remotes/jgarzik <<\EOF
-URL: http://www.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/git/jgarzik/
-EOF
+$ git config remote.linus.url http://www.kernel.org/pub/scm/git/git.git/
 ------------------------------------------------
 
+and use the "linus" keyword with `git pull` instead of the full URL.
 
 Examples.
 
 . `git pull linus`
 . `git pull linus tag v0.99.1`
-. `git pull jgarzik/netdev-2.6.git/ e100`
 
 the above are equivalent to:
 
 . `git pull http://www.kernel.org/pub/scm/git/git.git/ HEAD`
 . `git pull http://www.kernel.org/pub/scm/git/git.git/ tag v0.99.1`
-. `git pull http://www.kernel.org/pub/.../jgarzik/netdev-2.6.git e100`
 
 
 How does the merge work?
@@ -1325,7 +1300,7 @@ differences since stage 2 (i.e. your version).
 Publishing your work
 --------------------
 
-So we can use somebody else's work from a remote repository; but
+So, we can use somebody else's work from a remote repository, but
 how can *you* prepare a repository to let other people pull from
 it?
 
@@ -1371,11 +1346,11 @@ $ mkdir my-git.git
 ------------
 
 Then, make that directory into a git repository by running
-`git init-db`, but this time, since its name is not the usual
+`git init`, but this time, since its name is not the usual
 `.git`, we do things slightly differently:
 
 ------------
-$ GIT_DIR=my-git.git git-init-db
+$ GIT_DIR=my-git.git git-init
 ------------
 
 Make sure this directory is available for others you want your
@@ -1494,8 +1469,8 @@ Working with Others
 Although git is a truly distributed system, it is often
 convenient to organize your project with an informal hierarchy
 of developers. Linux kernel development is run this way. There
-is a nice illustration (page 17, "Merges to Mainline") in Randy
-Dunlap's presentation (`http://tinyurl.com/a2jdg`).
+is a nice illustration (page 17, "Merges to Mainline") in
+link:http://tinyurl.com/a2jdg[Randy Dunlap's presentation].
 
 It should be stressed that this hierarchy is purely *informal*.
 There is nothing fundamental in git that enforces the "chain of
@@ -1511,7 +1486,7 @@ A recommended workflow for a "project lead" goes like this:
 +
 If other people are pulling from your repository over dumb
 transport protocols (HTTP), you need to keep this repository
-'dumb transport friendly'.  After `git init-db`,
+'dumb transport friendly'.  After `git init`,
 `$GIT_DIR/hooks/post-update` copied from the standard templates
 would contain a call to `git-update-server-info` but the
 `post-update` hook itself is disabled by default -- enable it
@@ -1546,7 +1521,8 @@ on that project and has an own "public repository" goes like this:
 
 1. Prepare your work repository, by `git clone` the public
    repository of the "project lead". The URL used for the
-   initial cloning is stored in `.git/remotes/origin`.
+   initial cloning is stored in the remote.origin.url
+   configuration variable.
 
 2. Prepare a public repository accessible to others, just like
    the "project lead" person does.
@@ -1586,14 +1562,15 @@ like this:
 1. Prepare your work repository, by `git clone` the public
    repository of the "project lead" (or a "subsystem
    maintainer", if you work on a subsystem). The URL used for
-   the initial cloning is stored in `.git/remotes/origin`.
+   the initial cloning is stored in the remote.origin.url
+   configuration variable.
 
 2. Do your work in your repository on 'master' branch.
 
 3. Run `git fetch origin` from the public repository of your
    upstream every once in a while. This does only the first
    half of `git pull` but does not merge. The head of the
-   public repository is stored in `.git/refs/heads/origin`.
+   public repository is stored in `.git/refs/remotes/origin/master`.
 
 4. Use `git cherry origin` to see which ones of your patches
    were accepted, and/or use `git rebase origin` to port your
@@ -1681,11 +1658,11 @@ $ git reset --hard master~2
 
 You can make sure 'git show-branch' matches the state before
 those two 'git merge' you just did.  Then, instead of running
-two 'git merge' commands in a row, you would pull these two
+two 'git merge' commands in a row, you would merge these two
 branch heads (this is known as 'making an Octopus'):
 
 ------------
-$ git pull . commit-fix diff-fix
+$ git merge commit-fix diff-fix
 $ git show-branch
 ! [commit-fix] Fix commit message normalization.
  ! [diff-fix] Fix rename detection.
@@ -1701,7 +1678,7 @@ $ git show-branch
 
 Note that you should not do Octopus because you can.  An octopus
 is a valid thing to do and often makes it easier to view the
-commit history if you are pulling more than two independent
+commit history if you are merging more than two independent
 changes at the same time.  However, if you have merge conflicts
 with any of the branches you are merging in and need to hand
 resolve, that is an indication that the development happened in
index 8e09bea..764cc56 100644 (file)
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ them first before running git pull.
 ================================
 The `pull` command knows where to get updates from because of certain
 configuration variables that were set by the first `git clone`
-command; see `git repo-config -l` and the gitlink:git-repo-config[1] man
+command; see `git config -l` and the gitlink:git-config[1] man
 page for details.
 ================================
 
@@ -80,7 +80,7 @@ it:
 ------------------------------------------------
 $ mkdir /pub/my-repo.git
 $ cd /pub/my-repo.git
-$ git --bare init-db --shared
+$ git --bare init --shared
 $ git --bare fetch /home/alice/myproject master:master
 ------------------------------------------------
 
index 883c1bb..378e72f 100644 (file)
@@ -159,7 +159,7 @@ or like this (when '--cc' option is used):
        deleted file mode <mode>,<mode>
 +
 The `mode <mode>,<mode>..<mode>` line appears only if at least one of
-the <mode> is diferent from the rest. Extended headers with
+the <mode> is different from the rest. Extended headers with
 information about detected contents movement (renames and
 copying detection) are designed to work with diff of two
 <tree-ish> and are not used by combined diff format.
index da1cc60..019a39f 100644 (file)
        Turn off rename detection, even when the configuration
        file gives the default to do so.
 
+--check::
+       Warn if changes introduce trailing whitespace
+       or an indent that uses a space before a tab.
+
 --full-index::
        Instead of the first handful characters, show full
        object name of pre- and post-image blob on the "index"
index cb4e562..34cd306 100644 (file)
@@ -6,8 +6,8 @@ June 2005
 Introduction
 ------------
 
-The diff commands git-diff-index, git-diff-files, git-diff-tree, and
-git-diff-stages can be told to manipulate differences they find in
+The diff commands git-diff-index, git-diff-files, and git-diff-tree
+can be told to manipulate differences they find in
 unconventional ways before showing diff(1) output.  The manipulation
 is collectively called "diffcore transformation".  This short note
 describes what they are and how to use them to produce diff outputs
@@ -30,9 +30,6 @@ files:
 
  - git-diff-tree compares contents of two "tree" objects;
 
- - git-diff-stages compares contents of blobs at two stages in an
-   unmerged index file.
-
 In all of these cases, the commands themselves compare
 corresponding paths in the two sets of files.  The result of
 comparison is passed from these commands to what is internally
diff --git a/Documentation/docbook-xsl.css b/Documentation/docbook-xsl.css
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..8821e30
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,286 @@
+/*\r
+  CSS stylesheet for XHTML produced by DocBook XSL stylesheets.\r
+  Tested with XSL stylesheets 1.61.2, 1.67.2\r
+*/\r
+\r
+span.strong {\r
+  font-weight: bold;\r
+}\r
+\r
+body blockquote {\r
+  margin-top: .75em;\r
+  line-height: 1.5;\r
+  margin-bottom: .75em;\r
+}\r
+\r
+html body {\r
+  margin: 1em 5% 1em 5%;\r
+  line-height: 1.2;\r
+}\r
+\r
+body div {\r
+  margin: 0;\r
+}\r
+\r
+h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6,\r
+div.toc p b,\r
+div.list-of-figures p b,\r
+div.list-of-tables p b,\r
+div.abstract p.title\r
+{\r
+  color: #527bbd;\r
+  font-family: tahoma, verdana, sans-serif;\r
+}\r
+\r
+div.toc p:first-child,\r
+div.list-of-figures p:first-child,\r
+div.list-of-tables p:first-child,\r
+div.example p.title\r
+{\r
+  margin-bottom: 0.2em;\r
+}\r
+\r
+body h1 {\r
+  margin: .0em 0 0 -4%;\r
+  line-height: 1.3;\r
+  border-bottom: 2px solid silver;\r
+}\r
+\r
+body h2 {\r
+  margin: 0.5em 0 0 -4%;\r
+  line-height: 1.3;\r
+  border-bottom: 2px solid silver;\r
+}\r
+\r
+body h3 {\r
+  margin: .8em 0 0 -3%;\r
+  line-height: 1.3;\r
+}\r
+\r
+body h4 {\r
+  margin: .8em 0 0 -3%;\r
+  line-height: 1.3;\r
+}\r
+\r
+body h5 {\r
+  margin: .8em 0 0 -2%;\r
+  line-height: 1.3;\r
+}\r
+\r
+body h6 {\r
+  margin: .8em 0 0 -1%;\r
+  line-height: 1.3;\r
+}\r
+\r
+body hr {\r
+  border: none; /* Broken on IE6 */\r
+}\r
+div.footnotes hr {\r
+  border: 1px solid silver;\r
+}\r
+\r
+div.navheader th, div.navheader td, div.navfooter td {\r
+  font-family: sans-serif;\r
+  font-size: 0.9em;\r
+  font-weight: bold;\r
+  color: #527bbd;\r
+}\r
+div.navheader img, div.navfooter img {\r
+  border-style: none;\r
+}\r
+div.navheader a, div.navfooter a {\r
+  font-weight: normal;\r
+}\r
+div.navfooter hr {\r
+  border: 1px solid silver;\r
+}\r
+\r
+body td {\r
+  line-height: 1.2\r
+}\r
+\r
+body th {\r
+  line-height: 1.2;\r
+}\r
+\r
+ol {\r
+  line-height: 1.2;\r
+}\r
+\r
+ul, body dir, body menu {\r
+  line-height: 1.2;\r
+}\r
+\r
+html {\r
+  margin: 0; \r
+  padding: 0;\r
+}\r
+\r
+body h1, body h2, body h3, body h4, body h5, body h6 {\r
+  margin-left: 0\r
+} \r
+\r
+body pre {\r
+  margin: 0.5em 10% 0.5em 1em;\r
+  line-height: 1.0;\r
+  color: navy;\r
+}\r
+\r
+tt.literal, code.literal {\r
+  color: navy;\r
+}\r
+\r
+div.literallayout p {\r
+  padding: 0em;\r
+  margin: 0em;\r
+}\r
+\r
+div.literallayout {\r
+  font-family: monospace;\r
+#  margin: 0.5em 10% 0.5em 1em;\r
+  margin: 0em;\r
+  color: navy;\r
+  border: 1px solid silver;\r
+  background: #f4f4f4;\r
+  padding: 0.5em;\r
+}\r
+\r
+.programlisting, .screen {\r
+  border: 1px solid silver;\r
+  background: #f4f4f4;\r
+  margin: 0.5em 10% 0.5em 0;\r
+  padding: 0.5em 1em;\r
+}\r
+\r
+div.sidebar {\r
+  background: #ffffee;\r
+  margin: 1.0em 10% 0.5em 0;\r
+  padding: 0.5em 1em;\r
+  border: 1px solid silver;\r
+}\r
+div.sidebar * { padding: 0; }\r
+div.sidebar div { margin: 0; }\r
+div.sidebar p.title {\r
+  font-family: sans-serif;\r
+  margin-top: 0.5em;\r
+  margin-bottom: 0.2em;\r
+}\r
+\r
+div.bibliomixed {\r
+  margin: 0.5em 5% 0.5em 1em;\r
+}\r
+\r
+div.glossary dt {\r
+  font-weight: bold;\r
+}\r
+div.glossary dd p {\r
+  margin-top: 0.2em;\r
+}\r
+\r
+dl {\r
+  margin: .8em 0;\r
+  line-height: 1.2;\r
+}\r
+\r
+dt {\r
+  margin-top: 0.5em;\r
+}\r
+\r
+dt span.term {\r
+  font-style: italic;\r
+}\r
+\r
+div.variablelist dd p {\r
+  margin-top: 0;\r
+}\r
+\r
+div.itemizedlist li, div.orderedlist li {\r
+  margin-left: -0.8em;\r
+  margin-top: 0.5em;\r
+}\r
+\r
+ul, ol {\r
+    list-style-position: outside;\r
+}\r
+\r
+div.sidebar ul, div.sidebar ol {\r
+    margin-left: 2.8em;\r
+}\r
+\r
+div.itemizedlist p.title,\r
+div.orderedlist p.title,\r
+div.variablelist p.title\r
+{\r
+  margin-bottom: -0.8em;\r
+}\r
+\r
+div.revhistory table {\r
+  border-collapse: collapse;\r
+  border: none;\r
+}\r
+div.revhistory th {\r
+  border: none;\r
+  color: #527bbd;\r
+  font-family: tahoma, verdana, sans-serif;\r
+}\r
+div.revhistory td {\r
+  border: 1px solid silver;\r
+}\r
+\r
+/* Keep TOC and index lines close together. */\r
+div.toc dl, div.toc dt,\r
+div.list-of-figures dl, div.list-of-figures dt,\r
+div.list-of-tables dl, div.list-of-tables dt,\r
+div.indexdiv dl, div.indexdiv dt\r
+{\r
+  line-height: normal;\r
+  margin-top: 0;\r
+  margin-bottom: 0;\r
+}\r
+\r
+/*\r
+  Table styling does not work because of overriding attributes in\r
+  generated HTML.\r
+*/\r
+div.table table,\r
+div.informaltable table\r
+{\r
+    margin-left: 0;\r
+    margin-right: 5%;\r
+    margin-bottom: 0.8em;\r
+}\r
+div.informaltable table\r
+{\r
+    margin-top: 0.4em\r
+}\r
+div.table thead,\r
+div.table tfoot,\r
+div.table tbody,\r
+div.informaltable thead,\r
+div.informaltable tfoot,\r
+div.informaltable tbody\r
+{\r
+    /* No effect in IE6. */\r
+    border-top: 2px solid #527bbd;\r
+    border-bottom: 2px solid #527bbd;\r
+}\r
+div.table thead, div.table tfoot,\r
+div.informaltable thead, div.informaltable tfoot\r
+{\r
+    font-weight: bold;\r
+}\r
+\r
+div.mediaobject img {\r
+    border: 1px solid silver;\r
+    margin-bottom: 0.8em;\r
+}\r
+div.figure p.title,\r
+div.table p.title\r
+{\r
+  margin-top: 1em;\r
+  margin-bottom: 0.4em;\r
+}\r
+\r
+@media print {\r
+  div.navheader, div.navfooter { display: none; }\r
+}\r
index 4e83994..08c61b1 100644 (file)
@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ Everybody uses these commands to maintain git repositories.
   * gitlink:git-init[1] or gitlink:git-clone[1] to create a
     new repository.
 
-  * gitlink:git-fsck-objects[1] to check the repository for errors.
+  * gitlink:git-fsck[1] to check the repository for errors.
 
   * gitlink:git-prune[1] to remove unused objects in the repository.
 
@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ Examples
 Check health and remove cruft.::
 +
 ------------
-$ git fsck-objects <1>
+$ git fsck <1>
 $ git count-objects <2>
 $ git repack <3>
 $ git gc <4>
@@ -148,8 +148,7 @@ modification will be caught if you do `git commit -a` later.
 <8> redo the commit undone in the previous step, using the message
 you originally wrote.
 <9> switch to the master branch.
-<10> merge a topic branch into your master branch.  You can also use
-`git pull . alsa-audio`, i.e. pull from the local repository.
+<10> merge a topic branch into your master branch.
 <11> review commit logs; other forms to limit output can be
 combined and include `\--max-count=10` (show 10 commits),
 `\--until=2005-12-10`, etc.
@@ -213,12 +212,12 @@ Push into another repository.::
 ------------
 satellite$ git clone mothership:frotz frotz <1>
 satellite$ cd frotz
-satellite$ git repo-config --get-regexp '^(remote|branch)\.' <2>
+satellite$ git config --get-regexp '^(remote|branch)\.' <2>
 remote.origin.url mothership:frotz
 remote.origin.fetch refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*
 branch.master.remote origin
 branch.master.merge refs/heads/master
-satellite$ git repo-config remote.origin.push \
+satellite$ git config remote.origin.push \
            master:refs/remotes/satellite/master <3>
 satellite$ edit/compile/test/commit
 satellite$ git push origin <4>
index 95bea66..b73a99d 100644 (file)
@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@ git-add - Add file contents to the changeset to be committed next
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
-'git-add' [-n] [-v] [-f] [--interactive] [--] <file>...
+'git-add' [-n] [-v] [-f] [--interactive | -i] [--] <file>...
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
@@ -52,7 +52,7 @@ OPTIONS
 -f::
        Allow adding otherwise ignored files.
 
-\--interactive::
+\i, \--interactive::
        Add modified contents in the working tree interactively to
        the index.
 
@@ -83,7 +83,7 @@ git-add git-*.sh::
 Interactive mode
 ----------------
 When the command enters the interactive mode, it shows the
-output of the 'status' subcommand, and then goes into ints
+output of the 'status' subcommand, and then goes into its
 interactive command loop.
 
 The command loop shows the list of subcommands available, and
index 53e81cb..4fb1d84 100644 (file)
@@ -3,14 +3,15 @@ git-am(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-am - Apply a series of patches in a mailbox
+git-am - Apply a series of patches from a mailbox
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
 [verse]
 'git-am' [--signoff] [--dotest=<dir>] [--utf8 | --no-utf8] [--binary] [--3way]
-         [--interactive] [--whitespace=<option>] <mbox>...
+         [--interactive] [--whitespace=<option>] [-C<n>] [-p<n>]
+        <mbox>...
 'git-am' [--skip | --resolved]
 
 DESCRIPTION
@@ -21,6 +22,10 @@ current branch.
 
 OPTIONS
 -------
+<mbox>...::
+       The list of mailbox files to read patches from. If you do not
+       supply this argument, reads from the standard input.
+
 --signoff::
        Add `Signed-off-by:` line to the commit message, using
        the committer identity of yourself.
@@ -64,6 +69,10 @@ default.   You could use `--no-utf8` to override this.
        This flag is passed to the `git-apply` program that applies
        the patch.
 
+-C<n>, -p<n>::
+       These flag are passed to the `git-apply` program that applies
+       the patch.
+
 --interactive::
        Run interactively, just like git-applymbox.
 
index 33b93db..065ba1b 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-apply(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-apply - Apply patch on a git index file and a work tree
+git-apply - Apply a patch on a git index file and a working tree
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index f74c6a4..95dc65a 100644 (file)
@@ -42,13 +42,13 @@ OPTIONS
        and the current tree.
 
 -u::
-       By default, the commit log message, author name and
-       author email are taken from the e-mail without any
-       charset conversion, after minimally decoding MIME
-       transfer encoding.  This flag causes the resulting
-       commit to be encoded in utf-8 by transliterating them.
-       Note that the patch is always used as is without charset
-       conversion, even with this flag.
+       The commit log message, author name and author email are
+       taken from the e-mail, and after minimally decoding MIME
+       transfer encoding, re-coded in UTF-8 by transliterating
+       them.  This used to be optional but now it is the default.
++
+Note that the patch is always used as-is without charset
+conversion, even with this flag.
 
 -c .dotest/<num>::
        When the patch contained in an e-mail does not cleanly
index 2b1ff14..451434a 100644 (file)
@@ -12,6 +12,9 @@ SYNOPSIS
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
+This is usually not what an end user wants to run directly.  See
+gitlink:git-am[1] instead.
+
 Takes three files <msg>, <patch>, and <info> prepared from an
 e-mail message by 'git-mailinfo', and creates a commit.  It is
 usually not necessary to use this command directly.
index 031fcd5..493474b 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-archive(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-archive - Creates a archive of the files in the named tree
+git-archive - Creates an archive of files from a named tree
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index ac4b496..16ec726 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-bisect(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-bisect - Find the change that introduced a bug
+git-bisect - Find the change that introduced a bug by binary search
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index bdfc666..5c9888d 100644 (file)
@@ -8,8 +8,8 @@ git-blame - Show what revision and author last modified each line of a file
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
 [verse]
-'git-blame' [-c] [-l] [-t] [-f] [-n] [-p] [-L n,m] [-S <revs-file>]
-            [-M] [-C] [-C] [--since=<date>] [<rev>] [--] <file>
+'git-blame' [-c] [-l] [-t] [-f] [-n] [-p] [--incremental] [-L n,m] [-S <revs-file>]
+            [-M] [-C] [-C] [--since=<date>] [<rev> | --contents <file>] [--] <file>
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ replaced; you need to use a tool such as gitlink:git-diff[1] or the "pickaxe"
 interface briefly mentioned in the following paragraph.
 
 Apart from supporting file annotation, git also supports searching the
-development history for when a code snippet occured in a change. This makes it
+development history for when a code snippet occurred in a change. This makes it
 possible to track when a code snippet was added to a file, moved or copied
 between files, and eventually deleted or replaced. It works by searching for
 a text string in the diff. A small example:
@@ -63,6 +63,17 @@ OPTIONS
 -p, --porcelain::
        Show in a format designed for machine consumption.
 
+--incremental::
+       Show the result incrementally in a format designed for
+       machine consumption.
+
+--contents <file>::
+       When <rev> is not specified, the command annotates the
+       changes starting backwards from the working tree copy.
+       This flag makes the command pretend as if the working
+       tree copy has the contents of he named file (specify
+       `-` to make the command read from the standard input).
+
 -M::
        Detect moving lines in the file as well.  When a commit
        moves a block of lines in a file (e.g. the original file
@@ -89,7 +100,7 @@ THE PORCELAIN FORMAT
 --------------------
 
 In this format, each line is output after a header; the
-header at the minumum has the first line which has:
+header at the minimum has the first line which has:
 
 - 40-byte SHA-1 of the commit the line is attributed to;
 - the line number of the line in the original file;
@@ -112,15 +123,18 @@ header, prefixed by a TAB. This is to allow adding more
 header elements later.
 
 
-SPECIFIYING RANGES
-------------------
+SPECIFYING RANGES
+-----------------
 
 Unlike `git-blame` and `git-annotate` in older git, the extent
 of annotation can be limited to both line ranges and revision
 ranges.  When you are interested in finding the origin for
-ll. 40-60 for file `foo`, you can use `-L` option like this:
+ll. 40-60 for file `foo`, you can use `-L` option like these
+(they mean the same thing -- both ask for 21 lines starting at
+line 40):
 
        git blame -L 40,60 foo
+       git blame -L 40,+21 foo
 
 Also you can use regular expression to specify the line range.
 
@@ -155,6 +169,47 @@ parents, using `commit{caret}!` notation:
        git blame -C -C -f $commit^! -- foo
 
 
+INCREMENTAL OUTPUT
+------------------
+
+When called with `--incremental` option, the command outputs the
+result as it is built.  The output generally will talk about
+lines touched by more recent commits first (i.e. the lines will
+be annotated out of order) and is meant to be used by
+interactive viewers.
+
+The output format is similar to the Porcelain format, but it
+does not contain the actual lines from the file that is being
+annotated.
+
+. Each blame entry always starts with a line of:
+
+       <40-byte hex sha1> <sourceline> <resultline> <num_lines>
++
+Line numbers count from 1.
+
+. The first time that commit shows up in the stream, it has various
+  other information about it printed out with a one-word tag at the
+  beginning of each line about that "extended commit info" (author,
+  email, committer, dates, summary etc).
+
+. Unlike Porcelain format, the filename information is always
+  given and terminates the entry:
+
+       "filename" <whitespace-quoted-filename-goes-here>
++
+and thus it's really quite easy to parse for some line- and word-oriented
+parser (which should be quite natural for most scripting languages).
++
+[NOTE]
+For people who do parsing: to make it more robust, just ignore any
+lines in between the first and last one ("<sha1>" and "filename" lines)
+where you don't recognize the tag-words (or care about that particular
+one) at the beginning of the "extended information" lines. That way, if
+there is ever added information (like the commit encoding or extended
+commit commentary), a blame viewer won't ever care.
+
+
 SEE ALSO
 --------
 gitlink:git-annotate[1]
index e872fc8..aa1fdd4 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-branch(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-branch - List, create, or delete branches.
+git-branch - List, create, or delete branches
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
@@ -74,7 +74,7 @@ OPTIONS
        List both remote-tracking branches and local branches.
 
 -v::
-       Show sha1 and commit subjectline for each head.
+       Show sha1 and commit subject line for each head.
 
 --abbrev=<length>::
        Alter minimum display length for sha1 in output listing,
index 5e9cbf8..075c0d0 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-cat-file(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-cat-file - Provide content or type information for repository objects
+git-cat-file - Provide content or type/size information for repository objects
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
@@ -19,7 +19,9 @@ or '-s' is used to find the object size.
 OPTIONS
 -------
 <object>::
-       The sha1 identifier of the object.
+       The name of the object to show.
+       For a more complete list of ways to spell object names, see
+       "SPECIFYING REVISIONS" section in gitlink:git-rev-parse[1].
 
 -t::
        Instead of the content, show the object type identified by
index 765c173..6dd6db0 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-checkout-index(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-checkout-index - Copy files from the index to the working directory
+git-checkout-index - Copy files from the index to the working tree
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index fbdbadc..e4ffde4 100644 (file)
@@ -8,8 +8,8 @@ git-checkout - Checkout and switch to a branch
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
 [verse]
-'git-checkout' [-f] [-b <new_branch> [-l]] [-m] [<branch>]
-'git-checkout' [-m] [<branch>] <paths>...
+'git-checkout' [-q] [-f] [-b <new_branch> [-l]] [-m] [<branch>]
+'git-checkout' [<tree-ish>] <paths>...
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
@@ -22,15 +22,20 @@ be created.
 
 When <paths> are given, this command does *not* switch
 branches.  It updates the named paths in the working tree from
-the index file (i.e. it runs `git-checkout-index -f -u`).  In
+the index file (i.e. it runs `git-checkout-index -f -u`), or a
+named commit.  In
 this case, `-f` and `-b` options are meaningless and giving
-either of them results in an error.  <branch> argument can be
-used to specify a specific tree-ish to update the index for the
-given paths before updating the working tree.
+either of them results in an error.  <tree-ish> argument can be
+used to specify a specific tree-ish (i.e. commit, tag or tree)
+to update the index for the given paths before updating the
+working tree.
 
 
 OPTIONS
 -------
+-q::
+       Quiet, supress feedback messages.
+
 -f::
        Force a re-read of everything.
 
@@ -63,7 +68,47 @@ and mark the resolved paths with `git update-index`.
 
 <branch>::
        Branch to checkout; may be any object ID that resolves to a
-       commit. Defaults to HEAD.
+       commit.  Defaults to HEAD.
++
+When this parameter names a non-branch (but still a valid commit object),
+your HEAD becomes 'detached'.
+
+
+Detached HEAD
+-------------
+
+It is sometimes useful to be able to 'checkout' a commit that is
+not at the tip of one of your branches.  The most obvious
+example is to check out the commit at a tagged official release
+point, like this:
+
+------------
+$ git checkout v2.6.18
+------------
+
+Earlier versions of git did not allow this and asked you to
+create a temporary branch using `-b` option, but starting from
+version 1.5.0, the above command 'detaches' your HEAD from the
+current branch and directly point at the commit named by the tag
+(`v2.6.18` in the above example).
+
+You can use usual git commands while in this state.  You can use
+`git-reset --hard $othercommit` to further move around, for
+example.  You can make changes and create a new commit on top of
+a detached HEAD.  You can even create a merge by using `git
+merge $othercommit`.
+
+The state you are in while your HEAD is detached is not recorded
+by any branch (which is natural --- you are not on any branch).
+What this means is that you can discard your temporary commits
+and merges by switching back to an existing branch (e.g. `git
+checkout master`), and a later `git prune` or `git gc` would
+garbage-collect them.  If you did this by mistake, you can ask
+the reflog for HEAD where you were, e.g.
+
+------------
+$ git log -g -2 HEAD
+------------
 
 
 EXAMPLES
index 875edb6..3149d08 100644 (file)
@@ -19,6 +19,8 @@ OPTIONS
 -------
 <commit>::
        Commit to cherry-pick.
+       For a more complete list of ways to spell commits, see
+       "SPECIFYING REVISIONS" section in gitlink:git-rev-parse[1].
 
 -e|--edit::
        With this option, `git-cherry-pick` will let you edit the commit
index a782074..707376f 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-clone(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-clone - Clones a repository
+git-clone - Clones a repository into a new directory
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index 77ba96e..cf25507 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-commit-tree(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-commit-tree - Creates a new commit object
+git-commit-tree - Create a new commit object
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
@@ -12,6 +12,9 @@ SYNOPSIS
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
+This is usually not what an end user wants to run directly.  See
+gitlink:git-commit[1] instead.
+
 Creates a new commit object based on the provided tree object and
 emits the new commit object id on stdout. If no parent is given then
 it is considered to be an initial tree.
index a7adf24..2187eee 100644 (file)
@@ -3,13 +3,13 @@ git-commit(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-commit - Record your changes
+git-commit - Record changes to the repository
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
 [verse]
-'git-commit' [-a] [-s] [-v] [(-c | -C) <commit> | -F <file> | -m <msg>]
-          [--no-verify] [--amend] [-e] [--author <author>]
+'git-commit' [-a] [-s] [-v] [(-c | -C) <commit> | -F <file> | -m <msg> |
+           --amend] [--no-verify] [-e] [--author <author>]
           [--] [[-i | -o ]<file>...]
 
 DESCRIPTION
@@ -32,7 +32,8 @@ methods:
 
 4. by using the -a switch with the 'commit' command to automatically "add"
    changes from all known files i.e. files that have already been committed
-   before, and perform the actual commit.
+   before, and to automatically "rm" files that have been
+   removed from the working tree, and perform the actual commit.
 
 The gitlink:git-status[1] command can be used to obtain a
 summary of what is included by any of the above for the next
@@ -72,12 +73,8 @@ OPTIONS
        Add Signed-off-by line at the end of the commit message.
 
 --no-verify::
-       By default, the command looks for suspicious lines the
-       commit introduces, and aborts committing if there is one.
-       The definition of 'suspicious lines' is currently the
-       lines that has trailing whitespaces, and the lines whose
-       indentation has a SP character immediately followed by a
-       TAB character.  This option turns off the check.
+       This option bypasses the pre-commit hook.
+       See also link:hooks.html[hooks].
 
 -e|--edit::
        The message taken from file with `-F`, command line with
@@ -114,7 +111,7 @@ but can be used to amend a merge commit.
        are concluding a conflicted merge.
 
 -q|--quiet::
-       Supress commit summary message.
+       Suppress commit summary message.
 
 \--::
        Do not interpret any more arguments as options.
@@ -145,11 +142,6 @@ $ git add hello.c
 $ git commit
 ------------
 
-////////////
-We should fix 'git rm' to remove goodbye.c from both index and
-working tree for the above example.
-////////////
-
 Instead of staging files after each individual change, you can
 tell `git commit` to notice the changes to the files whose
 contents are tracked in
@@ -226,6 +218,12 @@ refuses to run when given pathnames (but see `-i` option).
 DISCUSSION
 ----------
 
+Though not required, it's a good idea to begin the commit message
+with a single short (less than 50 character) line summarizing the
+change, followed by a blank line and then a more thorough description.
+Tools that turn commits into email, for example, use the first line
+on the Subject: line and the rest of the commit in the body.
+
 include::i18n.txt[]
 
 ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
diff --git a/Documentation/git-config.txt b/Documentation/git-config.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..6624484
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,227 @@
+git-config(1)
+=============
+
+NAME
+----
+git-config - Get and set repository or global options
+
+
+SYNOPSIS
+--------
+[verse]
+'git-config' [--global] [type] name [value [value_regex]]
+'git-config' [--global] [type] --add name value
+'git-config' [--global] [type] --replace-all name [value [value_regex]]
+'git-config' [--global] [type] --get name [value_regex]
+'git-config' [--global] [type] --get-all name [value_regex]
+'git-config' [--global] [type] --unset name [value_regex]
+'git-config' [--global] [type] --unset-all name [value_regex]
+'git-config' [--global] -l | --list
+
+DESCRIPTION
+-----------
+You can query/set/replace/unset options with this command. The name is
+actually the section and the key separated by a dot, and the value will be
+escaped.
+
+Multiple lines can be added to an option by using the '--add' option.
+If you want to update or unset an option which can occur on multiple
+lines, a POSIX regexp `value_regex` needs to be given.  Only the
+existing values that match the regexp are updated or unset.  If
+you want to handle the lines that do *not* match the regex, just
+prepend a single exclamation mark in front (see EXAMPLES).
+
+The type specifier can be either '--int' or '--bool', which will make
+'git-config' ensure that the variable(s) are of the given type and
+convert the value to the canonical form (simple decimal number for int,
+a "true" or "false" string for bool). If no type specifier is passed,
+no checks or transformations are performed on the value.
+
+This command will fail if:
+
+. The .git/config file is invalid,
+. Can not write to .git/config,
+. no section was provided,
+. the section or key is invalid,
+. you try to unset an option which does not exist,
+. you try to unset/set an option for which multiple lines match, or
+. you use --global option without $HOME being properly set.
+
+
+OPTIONS
+-------
+
+--replace-all::
+       Default behavior is to replace at most one line. This replaces
+       all lines matching the key (and optionally the value_regex).
+
+--add::
+       Adds a new line to the option without altering any existing
+       values.  This is the same as providing '^$' as the value_regex.
+
+--get::
+       Get the value for a given key (optionally filtered by a regex
+       matching the value). Returns error code 1 if the key was not
+       found and error code 2 if multiple key values were found.
+
+--get-all::
+       Like get, but does not fail if the number of values for the key
+       is not exactly one.
+
+--get-regexp::
+       Like --get-all, but interprets the name as a regular expression.
+
+--global::
+       Use global ~/.gitconfig file rather than the repository .git/config.
+
+--unset::
+       Remove the line matching the key from config file.
+
+--unset-all::
+       Remove all matching lines from config file.
+
+-l, --list::
+       List all variables set in config file.
+
+--bool::
+       git-config will ensure that the output is "true" or "false"
+
+--int::
+       git-config will ensure that the output is a simple
+       decimal number.  An optional value suffix of 'k', 'm', or 'g'
+       in the config file will cause the value to be multiplied
+       by 1024, 1048576, or 1073741824 prior to output.
+
+
+ENVIRONMENT
+-----------
+
+GIT_CONFIG::
+       Take the configuration from the given file instead of .git/config.
+       Using the "--global" option forces this to ~/.gitconfig.
+
+GIT_CONFIG_LOCAL::
+       Currently the same as $GIT_CONFIG; when Git will support global
+       configuration files, this will cause it to take the configuration
+       from the global configuration file in addition to the given file.
+
+
+EXAMPLE
+-------
+
+Given a .git/config like this:
+
+       #
+       # This is the config file, and
+       # a '#' or ';' character indicates
+       # a comment
+       #
+
+       ; core variables
+       [core]
+               ; Don't trust file modes
+               filemode = false
+
+       ; Our diff algorithm
+       [diff]
+               external = "/usr/local/bin/gnu-diff -u"
+               renames = true
+
+       ; Proxy settings
+       [core]
+               gitproxy="ssh" for "ssh://kernel.org/"
+               gitproxy="proxy-command" for kernel.org
+               gitproxy="myprotocol-command" for "my://"
+               gitproxy=default-proxy ; for all the rest
+
+you can set the filemode to true with
+
+------------
+% git config core.filemode true
+------------
+
+The hypothetical proxy command entries actually have a postfix to discern
+what URL they apply to. Here is how to change the entry for kernel.org
+to "ssh".
+
+------------
+% git config core.gitproxy '"ssh" for kernel.org' 'for kernel.org$'
+------------
+
+This makes sure that only the key/value pair for kernel.org is replaced.
+
+To delete the entry for renames, do
+
+------------
+% git config --unset diff.renames
+------------
+
+If you want to delete an entry for a multivar (like core.gitproxy above),
+you have to provide a regex matching the value of exactly one line.
+
+To query the value for a given key, do
+
+------------
+% git config --get core.filemode
+------------
+
+or
+
+------------
+% git config core.filemode
+------------
+
+or, to query a multivar:
+
+------------
+% git config --get core.gitproxy "for kernel.org$"
+------------
+
+If you want to know all the values for a multivar, do:
+
+------------
+% git config --get-all core.gitproxy
+------------
+
+If you like to live dangerous, you can replace *all* core.gitproxy by a
+new one with
+
+------------
+% git config --replace-all core.gitproxy ssh
+------------
+
+However, if you really only want to replace the line for the default proxy,
+i.e. the one without a "for ..." postfix, do something like this:
+
+------------
+% git config core.gitproxy ssh '! for '
+------------
+
+To actually match only values with an exclamation mark, you have to
+
+------------
+% git config section.key value '[!]'
+------------
+
+To add a new proxy, without altering any of the existing ones, use
+
+------------
+% git config core.gitproxy '"proxy" for example.com'
+------------
+
+
+include::config.txt[]
+
+
+Author
+------
+Written by Johannes Schindelin <Johannes.Schindelin@gmx.de>
+
+Documentation
+--------------
+Documentation by Johannes Schindelin, Petr Baudis and the git-list <git@vger.kernel.org>.
+
+GIT
+---
+Part of the gitlink:git[7] suite
+
index c59df64..91c8c92 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-count-objects(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-count-objects - Reports on unpacked objects
+git-count-objects - Count unpacked number of objects and their disk consumption
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
index 092d0d6..27d531b 100644 (file)
@@ -3,12 +3,12 @@ git-cvsexportcommit(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-cvsexportcommit - Export a commit to a CVS checkout
+git-cvsexportcommit - Export a single commit to a CVS checkout
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
-'git-cvsexportcommit' [-h] [-v] [-c] [-p] [-a] [-f] [-m msgprefix] [PARENTCOMMIT] COMMITID
+'git-cvsexportcommit' [-h] [-v] [-c] [-P] [-p] [-a] [-f] [-m msgprefix] [PARENTCOMMIT] COMMITID
 
 
 DESCRIPTION
@@ -46,6 +46,9 @@ OPTIONS
 -f::
        Force the merge even if the files are not up to date.
 
+-P::
+       Force the parent commit, even if it is not a direct parent.
+
 -m::
        Prepend the commit message with the provided prefix. 
        Useful for patch series and the like.
index 5c402de..f5450de 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-cvsimport(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-cvsimport - Import a CVS repository into git
+git-cvsimport - Salvage your data out of another SCM people love to hate
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ If you need to pass multiple options, separate them with a comma.
        Substitute the character "/" in branch names with <subst>
 
 -A <author-conv-file>::
-       CVS by default uses the unix username when writing its
+       CVS by default uses the Unix username when writing its
        commit logs. Using this option and an author-conv-file
        in this format
 
index 993adc7..9ddab71 100644 (file)
@@ -131,14 +131,14 @@ Giving these options is an error when used with `--inetd`; use
 the facility of inet daemon to achieve the same before spawning
 `git-daemon` if needed.
 
---enable-service, --disable-service::
+--enable=service, --disable=service::
        Enable/disable the service site-wide per default.  Note
        that a service disabled site-wide can still be enabled
        per repository if it is marked overridable and the
        repository enables the service with an configuration
        item.
 
---allow-override, --forbid-override::
+--allow-override=service, --forbid-override=service::
        Allow/forbid overriding the site-wide default with per
        repository configuration.  By default, all the services
        are overridable.
index 2700f35..47a583d 100644 (file)
@@ -14,8 +14,8 @@ DESCRIPTION
 -----------
 The command finds the most recent tag that is reachable from a
 commit, and if the commit itself is pointed at by the tag, shows
-the tag.  Otherwise, it suffixes the tag name with abbreviated
-object name of the commit.
+the tag.  Otherwise, it suffixes the tag name with the number of
+additional commits and the abbreviated object name of the commit.
 
 
 OPTIONS
@@ -35,6 +35,16 @@ OPTIONS
        Instead of using the default 8 hexadecimal digits as the
        abbreviated object name, use <n> digits.
 
+--candidates=<n>::
+       Instead of considering only the 10 most recent tags as
+       candidates to describe the input committish consider
+       up to <n> candidates.  Increasing <n> above 10 will take
+       slightly longer but may produce a more accurate result.
+
+--debug::
+       Verbosely display information about the searching strategy
+       being employed to standard error.  The tag name will still
+       be printed to standard out.
 
 EXAMPLES
 --------
@@ -42,12 +52,18 @@ EXAMPLES
 With something like git.git current tree, I get:
 
        [torvalds@g5 git]$ git-describe parent
-       v1.0.4-g2414721b
+       v1.0.4-14-g2414721
 
 i.e. the current head of my "parent" branch is based on v1.0.4,
-but since it has a few commits on top of that, it has added the
-git hash of the thing to the end: "-g" + 8-char shorthand for
-the commit `2414721b194453f058079d897d13c4e377f92dc6`.
+but since it has a handful commits on top of that,
+describe has added the number of additional commits ("14") and
+an abbreviated object name for the commit itself ("2414721")
+at the end.
+
+The number of additional commits is the number
+of commits which would be displayed by "git log v1.0.4..parent".
+The hash suffix is "-g" + 7-char abbreviation for the tip commit
+of parent (which was `2414721b194453f058079d897d13c4e377f92dc6`).
 
 Doing a "git-describe" on a tag-name will just show the tag name:
 
@@ -58,16 +74,43 @@ With --all, the command can use branch heads as references, so
 the output shows the reference path as well:
 
        [torvalds@g5 git]$ git describe --all --abbrev=4 v1.0.5^2
-       tags/v1.0.0-g975b
+       tags/v1.0.0-21-g975b
 
        [torvalds@g5 git]$ git describe --all HEAD^
-       heads/lt/describe-g975b
+       heads/lt/describe-7-g975b
+
+With --abbrev set to 0, the command can be used to find the
+closest tagname without any suffix:
+
+       [torvalds@g5 git]$ git describe --abbrev=0 v1.0.5^2
+       tags/v1.0.0
+
+SEARCH STRATEGY
+---------------
+
+For each committish supplied "git describe" will first look for
+a tag which tags exactly that commit.  Annotated tags will always
+be preferred over lightweight tags, and tags with newer dates will
+always be preferred over tags with older dates.  If an exact match
+is found, its name will be output and searching will stop.
+
+If an exact match was not found "git describe" will walk back
+through the commit history to locate an ancestor commit which
+has been tagged.  The ancestor's tag will be output along with an
+abbreviation of the input committish's SHA1.
+
+If multiple tags were found during the walk then the tag which
+has the fewest commits different from the input committish will be
+selected and output.  Here fewest commits different is defined as
+the number of commits which would be shown by "git log tag..input"
+will be the smallest number of commits possible.
 
 
 Author
 ------
 Written by Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>, but somewhat
-butchered by Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
+butchered by Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>.  Later significantly
+updated by Shawn Pearce <spearce@spearce.org>.
 
 Documentation
 --------------
diff --git a/Documentation/git-diff-stages.txt b/Documentation/git-diff-stages.txt
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 3273918..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,40 +0,0 @@
-git-diff-stages(1)
-==================
-
-NAME
-----
-git-diff-stages - Compares content and mode of blobs between stages in an unmerged index file
-
-
-SYNOPSIS
---------
-'git-diff-stages' [<common diff options>] <stage1> <stage2> [<path>...]
-
-DESCRIPTION
------------
-Compares the content and mode of the blobs in two stages in an
-unmerged index file.
-
-OPTIONS
--------
-include::diff-options.txt[]
-
-<stage1>,<stage2>::
-       The stage number to be compared.
-
-Output format
--------------
-include::diff-format.txt[]
-
-
-Author
-------
-Written by Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>
-
-Documentation
---------------
-Documentation by Junio C Hamano.
-
-GIT
----
-Part of the gitlink:git[7] suite
index 8977877..6a098df 100644 (file)
@@ -47,6 +47,9 @@ Just in case if you are doing something exotic, it should be
 noted that all of the <commit> in the above description can be
 any <tree-ish>.
 
+For a more complete list of ways to spell <commit>, see
+"SPECIFYING REVISIONS" section in gitlink:git-rev-parse[1].
+
 
 OPTIONS
 -------
diff --git a/Documentation/git-fast-import.txt b/Documentation/git-fast-import.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..445f6b8
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,901 @@
+git-fast-import(1)
+==================
+
+NAME
+----
+git-fast-import - Backend for fast Git data importers.
+
+
+SYNOPSIS
+--------
+frontend | 'git-fast-import' [options]
+
+DESCRIPTION
+-----------
+This program is usually not what the end user wants to run directly.
+Most end users want to use one of the existing frontend programs,
+which parses a specific type of foreign source and feeds the contents
+stored there to git-fast-import.
+
+fast-import reads a mixed command/data stream from standard input and
+writes one or more packfiles directly into the current repository.
+When EOF is received on standard input, fast import writes out
+updated branch and tag refs, fully updating the current repository
+with the newly imported data.
+
+The fast-import backend itself can import into an empty repository (one that
+has already been initialized by gitlink:git-init[1]) or incrementally
+update an existing populated repository.  Whether or not incremental
+imports are supported from a particular foreign source depends on
+the frontend program in use.
+
+
+OPTIONS
+-------
+--date-format=<fmt>::
+       Specify the type of dates the frontend will supply to
+       fast-import within `author`, `committer` and `tagger` commands.
+       See ``Date Formats'' below for details about which formats
+       are supported, and their syntax.
+
+--force::
+       Force updating modified existing branches, even if doing
+       so would cause commits to be lost (as the new commit does
+       not contain the old commit).
+
+--max-pack-size=<n>::
+       Maximum size of each output packfile, expressed in MiB.
+       The default is 4096 (4 GiB) as that is the maximum allowed
+       packfile size (due to file format limitations). Some
+       importers may wish to lower this, such as to ensure the
+       resulting packfiles fit on CDs.
+
+--depth=<n>::
+       Maximum delta depth, for blob and tree deltification.
+       Default is 10.
+
+--active-branches=<n>::
+       Maximum number of branches to maintain active at once.
+       See ``Memory Utilization'' below for details.  Default is 5.
+
+--export-marks=<file>::
+       Dumps the internal marks table to <file> when complete.
+       Marks are written one per line as `:markid SHA-1`.
+       Frontends can use this file to validate imports after they
+       have been completed.
+
+--export-pack-edges=<file>::
+       After creating a packfile, print a line of data to
+       <file> listing the filename of the packfile and the last
+       commit on each branch that was written to that packfile.
+       This information may be useful after importing projects
+       whose total object set exceeds the 4 GiB packfile limit,
+       as these commits can be used as edge points during calls
+       to gitlink:git-pack-objects[1].
+
+--quiet::
+       Disable all non-fatal output, making fast-import silent when it
+       is successful.  This option disables the output shown by
+       \--stats.
+
+--stats::
+       Display some basic statistics about the objects fast-import has
+       created, the packfiles they were stored into, and the
+       memory used by fast-import during this run.  Showing this output
+       is currently the default, but can be disabled with \--quiet.
+
+
+Performance
+-----------
+The design of fast-import allows it to import large projects in a minimum
+amount of memory usage and processing time.  Assuming the frontend
+is able to keep up with fast-import and feed it a constant stream of data,
+import times for projects holding 10+ years of history and containing
+100,000+ individual commits are generally completed in just 1-2
+hours on quite modest (~$2,000 USD) hardware.
+
+Most bottlenecks appear to be in foreign source data access (the
+source just cannot extract revisions fast enough) or disk IO (fast-import
+writes as fast as the disk will take the data).  Imports will run
+faster if the source data is stored on a different drive than the
+destination Git repository (due to less IO contention).
+
+
+Development Cost
+----------------
+A typical frontend for fast-import tends to weigh in at approximately 200
+lines of Perl/Python/Ruby code.  Most developers have been able to
+create working importers in just a couple of hours, even though it
+is their first exposure to fast-import, and sometimes even to Git.  This is
+an ideal situation, given that most conversion tools are throw-away
+(use once, and never look back).
+
+
+Parallel Operation
+------------------
+Like `git-push` or `git-fetch`, imports handled by fast-import are safe to
+run alongside parallel `git repack -a -d` or `git gc` invocations,
+or any other Git operation (including `git prune`, as loose objects
+are never used by fast-import).
+
+fast-import does not lock the branch or tag refs it is actively importing.
+After the import, during its ref update phase, fast-import tests each
+existing branch ref to verify the update will be a fast-forward
+update (the commit stored in the ref is contained in the new
+history of the commit to be written).  If the update is not a
+fast-forward update, fast-import will skip updating that ref and instead
+prints a warning message.  fast-import will always attempt to update all
+branch refs, and does not stop on the first failure.
+
+Branch updates can be forced with \--force, but its recommended that
+this only be used on an otherwise quiet repository.  Using \--force
+is not necessary for an initial import into an empty repository.
+
+
+Technical Discussion
+--------------------
+fast-import tracks a set of branches in memory.  Any branch can be created
+or modified at any point during the import process by sending a
+`commit` command on the input stream.  This design allows a frontend
+program to process an unlimited number of branches simultaneously,
+generating commits in the order they are available from the source
+data.  It also simplifies the frontend programs considerably.
+
+fast-import does not use or alter the current working directory, or any
+file within it.  (It does however update the current Git repository,
+as referenced by `GIT_DIR`.)  Therefore an import frontend may use
+the working directory for its own purposes, such as extracting file
+revisions from the foreign source.  This ignorance of the working
+directory also allows fast-import to run very quickly, as it does not
+need to perform any costly file update operations when switching
+between branches.
+
+Input Format
+------------
+With the exception of raw file data (which Git does not interpret)
+the fast-import input format is text (ASCII) based.  This text based
+format simplifies development and debugging of frontend programs,
+especially when a higher level language such as Perl, Python or
+Ruby is being used.
+
+fast-import is very strict about its input.  Where we say SP below we mean
+*exactly* one space.  Likewise LF means one (and only one) linefeed.
+Supplying additional whitespace characters will cause unexpected
+results, such as branch names or file names with leading or trailing
+spaces in their name, or early termination of fast-import when it encounters
+unexpected input.
+
+Date Formats
+~~~~~~~~~~~~
+The following date formats are supported.  A frontend should select
+the format it will use for this import by passing the format name
+in the \--date-format=<fmt> command line option.
+
+`raw`::
+       This is the Git native format and is `<time> SP <offutc>`.
+       It is also fast-import's default format, if \--date-format was
+       not specified.
++
+The time of the event is specified by `<time>` as the number of
+seconds since the UNIX epoch (midnight, Jan 1, 1970, UTC) and is
+written as an ASCII decimal integer.
++
+The local offset is specified by `<offutc>` as a positive or negative
+offset from UTC.  For example EST (which is 5 hours behind UTC)
+would be expressed in `<tz>` by ``-0500'' while UTC is ``+0000''.
+The local offset does not affect `<time>`; it is used only as an
+advisement to help formatting routines display the timestamp.
++
+If the local offset is not available in the source material, use
+``+0000'', or the most common local offset.  For example many
+organizations have a CVS repository which has only ever been accessed
+by users who are located in the same location and timezone.  In this
+case a reasonable offset from UTC could be assumed.
++
+Unlike the `rfc2822` format, this format is very strict.  Any
+variation in formatting will cause fast-import to reject the value.
+
+`rfc2822`::
+       This is the standard email format as described by RFC 2822.
++
+An example value is ``Tue Feb 6 11:22:18 2007 -0500''.  The Git
+parser is accurate, but a little on the lenient side.  It is the
+same parser used by gitlink:git-am[1] when applying patches
+received from email.
++
+Some malformed strings may be accepted as valid dates.  In some of
+these cases Git will still be able to obtain the correct date from
+the malformed string.  There are also some types of malformed
+strings which Git will parse wrong, and yet consider valid.
+Seriously malformed strings will be rejected.
++
+Unlike the `raw` format above, the timezone/UTC offset information
+contained in an RFC 2822 date string is used to adjust the date
+value to UTC prior to storage.  Therefore it is important that
+this information be as accurate as possible.
++
+If the source material uses RFC 2822 style dates,
+the frontend should let fast-import handle the parsing and conversion
+(rather than attempting to do it itself) as the Git parser has
+been well tested in the wild.
++
+Frontends should prefer the `raw` format if the source material
+already uses UNIX-epoch format, can be coaxed to give dates in that
+format, or its format is easiliy convertible to it, as there is no
+ambiguity in parsing.
+
+`now`::
+       Always use the current time and timezone.  The literal
+       `now` must always be supplied for `<when>`.
++
+This is a toy format.  The current time and timezone of this system
+is always copied into the identity string at the time it is being
+created by fast-import.  There is no way to specify a different time or
+timezone.
++
+This particular format is supplied as its short to implement and
+may be useful to a process that wants to create a new commit
+right now, without needing to use a working directory or
+gitlink:git-update-index[1].
++
+If separate `author` and `committer` commands are used in a `commit`
+the timestamps may not match, as the system clock will be polled
+twice (once for each command).  The only way to ensure that both
+author and committer identity information has the same timestamp
+is to omit `author` (thus copying from `committer`) or to use a
+date format other than `now`.
+
+Commands
+~~~~~~~~
+fast-import accepts several commands to update the current repository
+and control the current import process.  More detailed discussion
+(with examples) of each command follows later.
+
+`commit`::
+       Creates a new branch or updates an existing branch by
+       creating a new commit and updating the branch to point at
+       the newly created commit.
+
+`tag`::
+       Creates an annotated tag object from an existing commit or
+       branch.  Lightweight tags are not supported by this command,
+       as they are not recommended for recording meaningful points
+       in time.
+
+`reset`::
+       Reset an existing branch (or a new branch) to a specific
+       revision.  This command must be used to change a branch to
+       a specific revision without making a commit on it.
+
+`blob`::
+       Convert raw file data into a blob, for future use in a
+       `commit` command.  This command is optional and is not
+       needed to perform an import.
+
+`checkpoint`::
+       Forces fast-import to close the current packfile, generate its
+       unique SHA-1 checksum and index, and start a new packfile.
+       This command is optional and is not needed to perform
+       an import.
+
+`commit`
+~~~~~~~~
+Create or update a branch with a new commit, recording one logical
+change to the project.
+
+....
+       'commit' SP <ref> LF
+       mark?
+       ('author' SP <name> SP LT <email> GT SP <when> LF)?
+       'committer' SP <name> SP LT <email> GT SP <when> LF
+       data
+       ('from' SP <committish> LF)?
+       ('merge' SP <committish> LF)?
+       (filemodify | filedelete | filedeleteall)*
+       LF
+....
+
+where `<ref>` is the name of the branch to make the commit on.
+Typically branch names are prefixed with `refs/heads/` in
+Git, so importing the CVS branch symbol `RELENG-1_0` would use
+`refs/heads/RELENG-1_0` for the value of `<ref>`.  The value of
+`<ref>` must be a valid refname in Git.  As `LF` is not valid in
+a Git refname, no quoting or escaping syntax is supported here.
+
+A `mark` command may optionally appear, requesting fast-import to save a
+reference to the newly created commit for future use by the frontend
+(see below for format).  It is very common for frontends to mark
+every commit they create, thereby allowing future branch creation
+from any imported commit.
+
+The `data` command following `committer` must supply the commit
+message (see below for `data` command syntax).  To import an empty
+commit message use a 0 length data.  Commit messages are free-form
+and are not interpreted by Git.  Currently they must be encoded in
+UTF-8, as fast-import does not permit other encodings to be specified.
+
+Zero or more `filemodify`, `filedelete` and `filedeleteall` commands
+may be included to update the contents of the branch prior to
+creating the commit.  These commands may be supplied in any order.
+However it is recommended that a `filedeleteall` command preceed
+all `filemodify` commands in the same commit, as `filedeleteall`
+wipes the branch clean (see below).
+
+`author`
+^^^^^^^^
+An `author` command may optionally appear, if the author information
+might differ from the committer information.  If `author` is omitted
+then fast-import will automatically use the committer's information for
+the author portion of the commit.  See below for a description of
+the fields in `author`, as they are identical to `committer`.
+
+`committer`
+^^^^^^^^^^^
+The `committer` command indicates who made this commit, and when
+they made it.
+
+Here `<name>` is the person's display name (for example
+``Com M Itter'') and `<email>` is the person's email address
+(``cm@example.com'').  `LT` and `GT` are the literal less-than (\x3c)
+and greater-than (\x3e) symbols.  These are required to delimit
+the email address from the other fields in the line.  Note that
+`<name>` is free-form and may contain any sequence of bytes, except
+`LT` and `LF`.  It is typically UTF-8 encoded.
+
+The time of the change is specified by `<when>` using the date format
+that was selected by the \--date-format=<fmt> command line option.
+See ``Date Formats'' above for the set of supported formats, and
+their syntax.
+
+`from`
+^^^^^^
+The `from` command is used to specify the commit to initialize
+this branch from.  This revision will be the first ancestor of the
+new commit.
+
+Omitting the `from` command in the first commit of a new branch
+will cause fast-import to create that commit with no ancestor. This
+tends to be desired only for the initial commit of a project.
+Omitting the `from` command on existing branches is usually desired,
+as the current commit on that branch is automatically assumed to
+be the first ancestor of the new commit.
+
+As `LF` is not valid in a Git refname or SHA-1 expression, no
+quoting or escaping syntax is supported within `<committish>`.
+
+Here `<committish>` is any of the following:
+
+* The name of an existing branch already in fast-import's internal branch
+  table.  If fast-import doesn't know the name, its treated as a SHA-1
+  expression.
+
+* A mark reference, `:<idnum>`, where `<idnum>` is the mark number.
++
+The reason fast-import uses `:` to denote a mark reference is this character
+is not legal in a Git branch name.  The leading `:` makes it easy
+to distingush between the mark 42 (`:42`) and the branch 42 (`42`
+or `refs/heads/42`), or an abbreviated SHA-1 which happened to
+consist only of base-10 digits.
++
+Marks must be declared (via `mark`) before they can be used.
+
+* A complete 40 byte or abbreviated commit SHA-1 in hex.
+
+* Any valid Git SHA-1 expression that resolves to a commit.  See
+  ``SPECIFYING REVISIONS'' in gitlink:git-rev-parse[1] for details.
+
+The special case of restarting an incremental import from the
+current branch value should be written as:
+----
+       from refs/heads/branch^0
+----
+The `{caret}0` suffix is necessary as fast-import does not permit a branch to
+start from itself, and the branch is created in memory before the
+`from` command is even read from the input.  Adding `{caret}0` will force
+fast-import to resolve the commit through Git's revision parsing library,
+rather than its internal branch table, thereby loading in the
+existing value of the branch.
+
+`merge`
+^^^^^^^
+Includes one additional ancestor commit, and makes the current
+commit a merge commit.  An unlimited number of `merge` commands per
+commit are permitted by fast-import, thereby establishing an n-way merge.
+However Git's other tools never create commits with more than 15
+additional ancestors (forming a 16-way merge).  For this reason
+it is suggested that frontends do not use more than 15 `merge`
+commands per commit.
+
+Here `<committish>` is any of the commit specification expressions
+also accepted by `from` (see above).
+
+`filemodify`
+^^^^^^^^^^^^
+Included in a `commit` command to add a new file or change the
+content of an existing file.  This command has two different means
+of specifying the content of the file.
+
+External data format::
+       The data content for the file was already supplied by a prior
+       `blob` command.  The frontend just needs to connect it.
++
+....
+       'M' SP <mode> SP <dataref> SP <path> LF
+....
++
+Here `<dataref>` can be either a mark reference (`:<idnum>`)
+set by a prior `blob` command, or a full 40-byte SHA-1 of an
+existing Git blob object.
+
+Inline data format::
+       The data content for the file has not been supplied yet.
+       The frontend wants to supply it as part of this modify
+       command.
++
+....
+       'M' SP <mode> SP 'inline' SP <path> LF
+       data
+....
++
+See below for a detailed description of the `data` command.
+
+In both formats `<mode>` is the type of file entry, specified
+in octal.  Git only supports the following modes:
+
+* `100644` or `644`: A normal (not-executable) file.  The majority
+  of files in most projects use this mode.  If in doubt, this is
+  what you want.
+* `100755` or `755`: A normal, but executable, file.
+* `120000`: A symlink, the content of the file will be the link target.
+
+In both formats `<path>` is the complete path of the file to be added
+(if not already existing) or modified (if already existing).
+
+A `<path>` string must use UNIX-style directory seperators (forward
+slash `/`), may contain any byte other than `LF`, and must not
+start with double quote (`"`).
+
+If an `LF` or double quote must be encoded into `<path>` shell-style
+quoting should be used, e.g. `"path/with\n and \" in it"`.
+
+The value of `<path>` must be in canoncial form. That is it must not:
+
+* contain an empty directory component (e.g. `foo//bar` is invalid),
+* end with a directory seperator (e.g. `foo/` is invalid),
+* start with a directory seperator (e.g. `/foo` is invalid),
+* contain the special component `.` or `..` (e.g. `foo/./bar` and
+  `foo/../bar` are invalid).
+
+It is recommended that `<path>` always be encoded using UTF-8.
+
+`filedelete`
+^^^^^^^^^^^^
+Included in a `commit` command to remove a file from the branch.
+If the file removal makes its directory empty, the directory will
+be automatically removed too.  This cascades up the tree until the
+first non-empty directory or the root is reached.
+
+....
+       'D' SP <path> LF
+....
+
+here `<path>` is the complete path of the file to be removed.
+See `filemodify` above for a detailed description of `<path>`.
+
+`filedeleteall`
+^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
+Included in a `commit` command to remove all files (and also all
+directories) from the branch.  This command resets the internal
+branch structure to have no files in it, allowing the frontend
+to subsequently add all interesting files from scratch.
+
+....
+       'deleteall' LF
+....
+
+This command is extremely useful if the frontend does not know
+(or does not care to know) what files are currently on the branch,
+and therefore cannot generate the proper `filedelete` commands to
+update the content.
+
+Issuing a `filedeleteall` followed by the needed `filemodify`
+commands to set the correct content will produce the same results
+as sending only the needed `filemodify` and `filedelete` commands.
+The `filedeleteall` approach may however require fast-import to use slightly
+more memory per active branch (less than 1 MiB for even most large
+projects); so frontends that can easily obtain only the affected
+paths for a commit are encouraged to do so.
+
+`mark`
+~~~~~~
+Arranges for fast-import to save a reference to the current object, allowing
+the frontend to recall this object at a future point in time, without
+knowing its SHA-1.  Here the current object is the object creation
+command the `mark` command appears within.  This can be `commit`,
+`tag`, and `blob`, but `commit` is the most common usage.
+
+....
+       'mark' SP ':' <idnum> LF
+....
+
+where `<idnum>` is the number assigned by the frontend to this mark.
+The value of `<idnum>` is expressed as an ASCII decimal integer.
+The value 0 is reserved and cannot be used as
+a mark.  Only values greater than or equal to 1 may be used as marks.
+
+New marks are created automatically.  Existing marks can be moved
+to another object simply by reusing the same `<idnum>` in another
+`mark` command.
+
+`tag`
+~~~~~
+Creates an annotated tag referring to a specific commit.  To create
+lightweight (non-annotated) tags see the `reset` command below.
+
+....
+       'tag' SP <name> LF
+       'from' SP <committish> LF
+       'tagger' SP <name> SP LT <email> GT SP <when> LF
+       data
+       LF
+....
+
+where `<name>` is the name of the tag to create.
+
+Tag names are automatically prefixed with `refs/tags/` when stored
+in Git, so importing the CVS branch symbol `RELENG-1_0-FINAL` would
+use just `RELENG-1_0-FINAL` for `<name>`, and fast-import will write the
+corresponding ref as `refs/tags/RELENG-1_0-FINAL`.
+
+The value of `<name>` must be a valid refname in Git and therefore
+may contain forward slashes.  As `LF` is not valid in a Git refname,
+no quoting or escaping syntax is supported here.
+
+The `from` command is the same as in the `commit` command; see
+above for details.
+
+The `tagger` command uses the same format as `committer` within
+`commit`; again see above for details.
+
+The `data` command following `tagger` must supply the annotated tag
+message (see below for `data` command syntax).  To import an empty
+tag message use a 0 length data.  Tag messages are free-form and are
+not interpreted by Git.  Currently they must be encoded in UTF-8,
+as fast-import does not permit other encodings to be specified.
+
+Signing annotated tags during import from within fast-import is not
+supported.  Trying to include your own PGP/GPG signature is not
+recommended, as the frontend does not (easily) have access to the
+complete set of bytes which normally goes into such a signature.
+If signing is required, create lightweight tags from within fast-import with
+`reset`, then create the annotated versions of those tags offline
+with the standard gitlink:git-tag[1] process.
+
+`reset`
+~~~~~~~
+Creates (or recreates) the named branch, optionally starting from
+a specific revision.  The reset command allows a frontend to issue
+a new `from` command for an existing branch, or to create a new
+branch from an existing commit without creating a new commit.
+
+....
+       'reset' SP <ref> LF
+       ('from' SP <committish> LF)?
+       LF
+....
+
+For a detailed description of `<ref>` and `<committish>` see above
+under `commit` and `from`.
+
+The `reset` command can also be used to create lightweight
+(non-annotated) tags.  For example:
+
+====
+       reset refs/tags/938
+       from :938
+====
+
+would create the lightweight tag `refs/tags/938` referring to
+whatever commit mark `:938` references.
+
+`blob`
+~~~~~~
+Requests writing one file revision to the packfile.  The revision
+is not connected to any commit; this connection must be formed in
+a subsequent `commit` command by referencing the blob through an
+assigned mark.
+
+....
+       'blob' LF
+       mark?
+       data
+....
+
+The mark command is optional here as some frontends have chosen
+to generate the Git SHA-1 for the blob on their own, and feed that
+directly to `commit`.  This is typically more work than its worth
+however, as marks are inexpensive to store and easy to use.
+
+`data`
+~~~~~~
+Supplies raw data (for use as blob/file content, commit messages, or
+annotated tag messages) to fast-import.  Data can be supplied using an exact
+byte count or delimited with a terminating line.  Real frontends
+intended for production-quality conversions should always use the
+exact byte count format, as it is more robust and performs better.
+The delimited format is intended primarily for testing fast-import.
+
+Exact byte count format::
+       The frontend must specify the number of bytes of data.
++
+....
+       'data' SP <count> LF
+       <raw> LF
+....
++
+where `<count>` is the exact number of bytes appearing within
+`<raw>`.  The value of `<count>` is expressed as an ASCII decimal
+integer.  The `LF` on either side of `<raw>` is not
+included in `<count>` and will not be included in the imported data.
+
+Delimited format::
+       A delimiter string is used to mark the end of the data.
+       fast-import will compute the length by searching for the delimiter.
+       This format is primarly useful for testing and is not
+       recommended for real data.
++
+....
+       'data' SP '<<' <delim> LF
+       <raw> LF
+       <delim> LF
+....
++
+where `<delim>` is the chosen delimiter string.  The string `<delim>`
+must not appear on a line by itself within `<raw>`, as otherwise
+fast-import will think the data ends earlier than it really does.  The `LF`
+immediately trailing `<raw>` is part of `<raw>`.  This is one of
+the limitations of the delimited format, it is impossible to supply
+a data chunk which does not have an LF as its last byte.
+
+`checkpoint`
+~~~~~~~~~~~~
+Forces fast-import to close the current packfile, start a new one, and to
+save out all current branch refs, tags and marks.
+
+....
+       'checkpoint' LF
+       LF
+....
+
+Note that fast-import automatically switches packfiles when the current
+packfile reaches \--max-pack-size, or 4 GiB, whichever limit is
+smaller.  During an automatic packfile switch fast-import does not update
+the branch refs, tags or marks.
+
+As a `checkpoint` can require a significant amount of CPU time and
+disk IO (to compute the overall pack SHA-1 checksum, generate the
+corresponding index file, and update the refs) it can easily take
+several minutes for a single `checkpoint` command to complete.
+
+Frontends may choose to issue checkpoints during extremely large
+and long running imports, or when they need to allow another Git
+process access to a branch.  However given that a 30 GiB Subversion
+repository can be loaded into Git through fast-import in about 3 hours,
+explicit checkpointing may not be necessary.
+
+
+Tips and Tricks
+---------------
+The following tips and tricks have been collected from various
+users of fast-import, and are offered here as suggestions.
+
+Use One Mark Per Commit
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+When doing a repository conversion, use a unique mark per commit
+(`mark :<n>`) and supply the \--export-marks option on the command
+line.  fast-import will dump a file which lists every mark and the Git
+object SHA-1 that corresponds to it.  If the frontend can tie
+the marks back to the source repository, it is easy to verify the
+accuracy and completeness of the import by comparing each Git
+commit to the corresponding source revision.
+
+Coming from a system such as Perforce or Subversion this should be
+quite simple, as the fast-import mark can also be the Perforce changeset
+number or the Subversion revision number.
+
+Freely Skip Around Branches
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+Don't bother trying to optimize the frontend to stick to one branch
+at a time during an import.  Although doing so might be slightly
+faster for fast-import, it tends to increase the complexity of the frontend
+code considerably.
+
+The branch LRU builtin to fast-import tends to behave very well, and the
+cost of activating an inactive branch is so low that bouncing around
+between branches has virtually no impact on import performance.
+
+Handling Renames
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+When importing a renamed file or directory, simply delete the old
+name(s) and modify the new name(s) during the corresponding commit.
+Git performs rename detection after-the-fact, rather than explicitly
+during a commit.
+
+Use Tag Fixup Branches
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+Some other SCM systems let the user create a tag from multiple
+files which are not from the same commit/changeset.  Or to create
+tags which are a subset of the files available in the repository.
+
+Importing these tags as-is in Git is impossible without making at
+least one commit which ``fixes up'' the files to match the content
+of the tag.  Use fast-import's `reset` command to reset a dummy branch
+outside of your normal branch space to the base commit for the tag,
+then commit one or more file fixup commits, and finally tag the
+dummy branch.
+
+For example since all normal branches are stored under `refs/heads/`
+name the tag fixup branch `TAG_FIXUP`.  This way it is impossible for
+the fixup branch used by the importer to have namespace conflicts
+with real branches imported from the source (the name `TAG_FIXUP`
+is not `refs/heads/TAG_FIXUP`).
+
+When committing fixups, consider using `merge` to connect the
+commit(s) which are supplying file revisions to the fixup branch.
+Doing so will allow tools such as gitlink:git-blame[1] to track
+through the real commit history and properly annotate the source
+files.
+
+After fast-import terminates the frontend will need to do `rm .git/TAG_FIXUP`
+to remove the dummy branch.
+
+Import Now, Repack Later
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+As soon as fast-import completes the Git repository is completely valid
+and ready for use.  Typicallly this takes only a very short time,
+even for considerably large projects (100,000+ commits).
+
+However repacking the repository is necessary to improve data
+locality and access performance.  It can also take hours on extremely
+large projects (especially if -f and a large \--window parameter is
+used).  Since repacking is safe to run alongside readers and writers,
+run the repack in the background and let it finish when it finishes.
+There is no reason to wait to explore your new Git project!
+
+If you choose to wait for the repack, don't try to run benchmarks
+or performance tests until repacking is completed.  fast-import outputs
+suboptimal packfiles that are simply never seen in real use
+situations.
+
+Repacking Historical Data
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+If you are repacking very old imported data (e.g. older than the
+last year), consider expending some extra CPU time and supplying
+\--window=50 (or higher) when you run gitlink:git-repack[1].
+This will take longer, but will also produce a smaller packfile.
+You only need to expend the effort once, and everyone using your
+project will benefit from the smaller repository.
+
+
+Packfile Optimization
+---------------------
+When packing a blob fast-import always attempts to deltify against the last
+blob written.  Unless specifically arranged for by the frontend,
+this will probably not be a prior version of the same file, so the
+generated delta will not be the smallest possible.  The resulting
+packfile will be compressed, but will not be optimal.
+
+Frontends which have efficient access to all revisions of a
+single file (for example reading an RCS/CVS ,v file) can choose
+to supply all revisions of that file as a sequence of consecutive
+`blob` commands.  This allows fast-import to deltify the different file
+revisions against each other, saving space in the final packfile.
+Marks can be used to later identify individual file revisions during
+a sequence of `commit` commands.
+
+The packfile(s) created by fast-import do not encourage good disk access
+patterns.  This is caused by fast-import writing the data in the order
+it is received on standard input, while Git typically organizes
+data within packfiles to make the most recent (current tip) data
+appear before historical data.  Git also clusters commits together,
+speeding up revision traversal through better cache locality.
+
+For this reason it is strongly recommended that users repack the
+repository with `git repack -a -d` after fast-import completes, allowing
+Git to reorganize the packfiles for faster data access.  If blob
+deltas are suboptimal (see above) then also adding the `-f` option
+to force recomputation of all deltas can significantly reduce the
+final packfile size (30-50% smaller can be quite typical).
+
+
+Memory Utilization
+------------------
+There are a number of factors which affect how much memory fast-import
+requires to perform an import.  Like critical sections of core
+Git, fast-import uses its own memory allocators to ammortize any overheads
+associated with malloc.  In practice fast-import tends to ammoritize any
+malloc overheads to 0, due to its use of large block allocations.
+
+per object
+~~~~~~~~~~
+fast-import maintains an in-memory structure for every object written in
+this execution.  On a 32 bit system the structure is 32 bytes,
+on a 64 bit system the structure is 40 bytes (due to the larger
+pointer sizes).  Objects in the table are not deallocated until
+fast-import terminates.  Importing 2 million objects on a 32 bit system
+will require approximately 64 MiB of memory.
+
+The object table is actually a hashtable keyed on the object name
+(the unique SHA-1).  This storage configuration allows fast-import to reuse
+an existing or already written object and avoid writing duplicates
+to the output packfile.  Duplicate blobs are surprisingly common
+in an import, typically due to branch merges in the source.
+
+per mark
+~~~~~~~~
+Marks are stored in a sparse array, using 1 pointer (4 bytes or 8
+bytes, depending on pointer size) per mark.  Although the array
+is sparse, frontends are still strongly encouraged to use marks
+between 1 and n, where n is the total number of marks required for
+this import.
+
+per branch
+~~~~~~~~~~
+Branches are classified as active and inactive.  The memory usage
+of the two classes is significantly different.
+
+Inactive branches are stored in a structure which uses 96 or 120
+bytes (32 bit or 64 bit systems, respectively), plus the length of
+the branch name (typically under 200 bytes), per branch.  fast-import will
+easily handle as many as 10,000 inactive branches in under 2 MiB
+of memory.
+
+Active branches have the same overhead as inactive branches, but
+also contain copies of every tree that has been recently modified on
+that branch.  If subtree `include` has not been modified since the
+branch became active, its contents will not be loaded into memory,
+but if subtree `src` has been modified by a commit since the branch
+became active, then its contents will be loaded in memory.
+
+As active branches store metadata about the files contained on that
+branch, their in-memory storage size can grow to a considerable size
+(see below).
+
+fast-import automatically moves active branches to inactive status based on
+a simple least-recently-used algorithm.  The LRU chain is updated on
+each `commit` command.  The maximum number of active branches can be
+increased or decreased on the command line with \--active-branches=.
+
+per active tree
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+Trees (aka directories) use just 12 bytes of memory on top of the
+memory required for their entries (see ``per active file'' below).
+The cost of a tree is virtually 0, as its overhead ammortizes out
+over the individual file entries.
+
+per active file entry
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+Files (and pointers to subtrees) within active trees require 52 or 64
+bytes (32/64 bit platforms) per entry.  To conserve space, file and
+tree names are pooled in a common string table, allowing the filename
+``Makefile'' to use just 16 bytes (after including the string header
+overhead) no matter how many times it occurs within the project.
+
+The active branch LRU, when coupled with the filename string pool
+and lazy loading of subtrees, allows fast-import to efficiently import
+projects with 2,000+ branches and 45,114+ files in a very limited
+memory footprint (less than 2.7 MiB per active branch).
+
+
+Author
+------
+Written by Shawn O. Pearce <spearce@spearce.org>.
+
+Documentation
+--------------
+Documentation by Shawn O. Pearce <spearce@spearce.org>.
+
+GIT
+---
+Part of the gitlink:git[7] suite
+
index 3e6cd88..105d76b 100644 (file)
@@ -8,10 +8,13 @@ git-fetch-pack - Receive missing objects from another repository
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
-'git-fetch-pack' [-q] [-k] [--exec=<git-upload-pack>] [<host>:]<directory> [<refs>...]
+'git-fetch-pack' [--all] [--quiet|-q] [--keep|-k] [--thin] [--upload-pack=<git-upload-pack>] [--depth=<n>] [-v] [<host>:]<directory> [<refs>...]
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
+Usually you would want to use gitlink:git-fetch[1] which is a
+higher level wrapper of this command instead.
+
 Invokes 'git-upload-pack' on a potentially remote repository,
 and asks it to send objects missing from this repository, to
 update the named heads.  The list of commits available locally
@@ -25,17 +28,24 @@ have a common ancestor commit.
 
 OPTIONS
 -------
--q::
+\--all::
+       Fetch all remote refs.
+
+\--quiet, \-q::
        Pass '-q' flag to 'git-unpack-objects'; this makes the
        cloning process less verbose.
 
--k::
+\--keep, \-k::
        Do not invoke 'git-unpack-objects' on received data, but
        create a single packfile out of it instead, and store it
        in the object database. If provided twice then the pack is
        locked against repacking.
 
---exec=<git-upload-pack>::
+\--thin::
+       Spend extra cycles to minimize the number of objects to be sent.
+       Use it on slower connection.
+
+\--upload-pack=<git-upload-pack>::
        Use this to specify the path to 'git-upload-pack' on the
        remote side, if is not found on your $PATH.
        Installations of sshd ignores the user's environment
@@ -47,6 +57,15 @@ OPTIONS
        shells by having a lean .bashrc file (they set most of
        the things up in .bash_profile).
 
+\--exec=<git-upload-pack>::
+       Same as \--upload-pack=<git-upload-pack>.
+
+\--depth=<n>::
+       Limit fetching to ancestor-chains not longer than n.
+
+\-v::
+       Run verbosely.
+
 <host>::
        A remote host that houses the repository.  When this
        part is specified, 'git-upload-pack' is invoked via
index a9e86fd..5fbeab7 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-fetch(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-fetch - Download objects and a head from another repository
+git-fetch - Download objects and refs from another repository
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
@@ -20,6 +20,14 @@ The ref names and their object names of fetched refs are stored
 in `.git/FETCH_HEAD`.  This information is left for a later merge
 operation done by "git merge".
 
+When <refspec> stores the fetched result in tracking branches,
+the tags that point at these branches are automatically
+followed.  This is done by first fetching from the remote using
+the given <refspec>s, and if the repository has objects that are
+pointed by remote tags that it does not yet have, then fetch
+those missing tags.  If the other end has tags that point at
+branches you are not interested in, you will not get them.
+
 
 OPTIONS
 -------
index 2bf6aef..f49b0d9 100644 (file)
@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@ git-for-each-ref - Output information on each ref
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
-'git-for-each-ref' [--count=<count>]\* [--shell|--perl|--python] [--sort=<key>]\* [--format=<format>] [<pattern>]
+'git-for-each-ref' [--count=<count>]\* [--shell|--perl|--python|--tcl] [--sort=<key>]\* [--format=<format>] [<pattern>]
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
@@ -15,7 +15,7 @@ DESCRIPTION
 Iterate over all refs that match `<pattern>` and show them
 according to the given `<format>`, after sorting them according
 to the given set of `<key>`.  If `<max>` is given, stop after
-showing that many refs.  The interporated values in `<format>`
+showing that many refs.  The interpolated values in `<format>`
 can optionally be quoted as string literals in the specified
 host language allowing their direct evaluation in that language.
 
@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ OPTIONS
        using fnmatch(3).  Refs that do not match the pattern
        are not shown.
 
---shell, --perl, --python::
+--shell, --perl, --python, --tcl::
        If given, strings that substitute `%(fieldname)`
        placeholders are quoted as string literals suitable for
        the specified host language.  This is meant to produce
@@ -66,7 +66,7 @@ keys.
 For all objects, the following names can be used:
 
 refname::
-       The name of the ref (the part after $GIT_DIR/refs/).
+       The name of the ref (the part after $GIT_DIR/).
 
 objecttype::
        The type of the object (`blob`, `tree`, `commit`, `tag`).
index 67425dc..59f34b9 100644 (file)
@@ -11,7 +11,8 @@ SYNOPSIS
 [verse]
 'git-format-patch' [-n | -k] [-o <dir> | --stdout] [--attach] [--thread]
                   [-s | --signoff] [--diff-options] [--start-number <n>]
-                  [--in-reply-to=Message-Id]
+                  [--in-reply-to=Message-Id] [--suffix=.<sfx>]
+                  [--ignore-if-in-upstream]
                   <since>[..<until>]
 
 DESCRIPTION
@@ -20,7 +21,9 @@ DESCRIPTION
 Prepare each commit between <since> and <until> with its patch in
 one file per commit, formatted to resemble UNIX mailbox format.
 If ..<until> is not specified, the head of the current working
-tree is implied.
+tree is implied.  For a more complete list of ways to spell
+<since> and <until>, see "SPECIFYING REVISIONS" section in
+gitlink:git-rev-parse[1].
 
 The output of this command is convenient for e-mail submission or
 for use with gitlink:git-am[1].
@@ -78,13 +81,34 @@ OPTIONS
        reply to the given Message-Id, which avoids breaking threads to
        provide a new patch series.
 
+--ignore-if-in-upstream::
+       Do not include a patch that matches a commit in
+       <until>..<since>.  This will examine all patches reachable
+       from <since> but not from <until> and compare them with the
+       patches being generated, and any patch that matches is
+       ignored.
+
+--suffix=.<sfx>::
+       Instead of using `.patch` as the suffix for generated
+       filenames, use specifed suffix.  A common alternative is
+       `--suffix=.txt`.
++
+Note that you would need to include the leading dot `.` if you
+want a filename like `0001-description-of-my-change.patch`, and
+the first letter does not have to be a dot.  Leaving it empty would
+not add any suffix.
+
 CONFIGURATION
 -------------
 You can specify extra mail header lines to be added to each
-message in the repository configuration as follows:
+message in the repository configuration.  Also you can specify
+the default suffix different from the built-in one:
 
+------------
 [format]
         headers = "Organization: git-foo\n"
+        suffix = .txt
+------------
 
 
 EXAMPLES
@@ -109,6 +133,9 @@ git-format-patch -M -B origin::
        understand renaming patches, so use it only when you know
        the recipient uses git to apply your patch.
 
+git-format-patch -3::
+       Extract three topmost commits from the current branch
+       and format them as e-mailable patches.
 
 See Also
 --------
index d0af99d..f21061e 100644 (file)
@@ -8,132 +8,10 @@ git-fsck-objects - Verifies the connectivity and validity of the objects in the
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
-[verse]
-'git-fsck-objects' [--tags] [--root] [--unreachable] [--cache]
-                [--full] [--strict] [<object>*]
+'git-fsck-objects' ...
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
-Verifies the connectivity and validity of the objects in the database.
-
-OPTIONS
--------
-<object>::
-       An object to treat as the head of an unreachability trace.
-+
-If no objects are given, git-fsck-objects defaults to using the
-index file and all SHA1 references in .git/refs/* as heads.
-
---unreachable::
-       Print out objects that exist but that aren't readable from any
-       of the reference nodes.
-
---root::
-       Report root nodes.
-
---tags::
-       Report tags.
-
---cache::
-       Consider any object recorded in the index also as a head node for
-       an unreachability trace.
-
---full::
-       Check not just objects in GIT_OBJECT_DIRECTORY
-       ($GIT_DIR/objects), but also the ones found in alternate
-       object pools listed in GIT_ALTERNATE_OBJECT_DIRECTORIES
-       or $GIT_DIR/objects/info/alternates,
-       and in packed git archives found in $GIT_DIR/objects/pack
-       and corresponding pack subdirectories in alternate
-       object pools.
-
---strict::
-       Enable more strict checking, namely to catch a file mode
-       recorded with g+w bit set, which was created by older
-       versions of git.  Existing repositories, including the
-       Linux kernel, git itself, and sparse repository have old
-       objects that triggers this check, but it is recommended
-       to check new projects with this flag.
-
-It tests SHA1 and general object sanity, and it does full tracking of
-the resulting reachability and everything else. It prints out any
-corruption it finds (missing or bad objects), and if you use the
-'--unreachable' flag it will also print out objects that exist but
-that aren't readable from any of the specified head nodes.
-
-So for example
-
-       git-fsck-objects --unreachable HEAD $(cat .git/refs/heads/*)
-
-will do quite a _lot_ of verification on the tree. There are a few
-extra validity tests to be added (make sure that tree objects are
-sorted properly etc), but on the whole if "git-fsck-objects" is happy, you
-do have a valid tree.
-
-Any corrupt objects you will have to find in backups or other archives
-(i.e., you can just remove them and do an "rsync" with some other site in
-the hopes that somebody else has the object you have corrupted).
-
-Of course, "valid tree" doesn't mean that it wasn't generated by some
-evil person, and the end result might be crap. git is a revision
-tracking system, not a quality assurance system ;)
-
-Extracted Diagnostics
----------------------
-
-expect dangling commits - potential heads - due to lack of head information::
-       You haven't specified any nodes as heads so it won't be
-       possible to differentiate between un-parented commits and
-       root nodes.
-
-missing sha1 directory '<dir>'::
-       The directory holding the sha1 objects is missing.
-
-unreachable <type> <object>::
-       The <type> object <object>, isn't actually referred to directly
-       or indirectly in any of the trees or commits seen. This can
-       mean that there's another root node that you're not specifying
-       or that the tree is corrupt. If you haven't missed a root node
-       then you might as well delete unreachable nodes since they
-       can't be used.
-
-missing <type> <object>::
-       The <type> object <object>, is referred to but isn't present in
-       the database.
-
-dangling <type> <object>::
-       The <type> object <object>, is present in the database but never
-       'directly' used. A dangling commit could be a root node.
-
-warning: git-fsck-objects: tree <tree> has full pathnames in it::
-       And it shouldn't...
-
-sha1 mismatch <object>::
-       The database has an object who's sha1 doesn't match the
-       database value.
-       This indicates a serious data integrity problem.
-
-Environment Variables
----------------------
-
-GIT_OBJECT_DIRECTORY::
-       used to specify the object database root (usually $GIT_DIR/objects)
-
-GIT_INDEX_FILE::
-       used to specify the index file of the index
-
-GIT_ALTERNATE_OBJECT_DIRECTORIES::
-       used to specify additional object database roots (usually unset)
-
-Author
-------
-Written by Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
-
-Documentation
---------------
-Documentation by David Greaves, Junio C Hamano and the git-list <git@vger.kernel.org>.
-
-GIT
----
-Part of the gitlink:git[7] suite
 
+This is a synonym for gitlink:git-fsck[1].  Please refer to the
+documentation of that command.
diff --git a/Documentation/git-fsck.txt b/Documentation/git-fsck.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..058009d
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,139 @@
+git-fsck(1)
+===========
+
+NAME
+----
+git-fsck - Verifies the connectivity and validity of the objects in the database
+
+
+SYNOPSIS
+--------
+[verse]
+'git-fsck' [--tags] [--root] [--unreachable] [--cache]
+                [--full] [--strict] [<object>*]
+
+DESCRIPTION
+-----------
+Verifies the connectivity and validity of the objects in the database.
+
+OPTIONS
+-------
+<object>::
+       An object to treat as the head of an unreachability trace.
++
+If no objects are given, git-fsck defaults to using the
+index file and all SHA1 references in .git/refs/* as heads.
+
+--unreachable::
+       Print out objects that exist but that aren't readable from any
+       of the reference nodes.
+
+--root::
+       Report root nodes.
+
+--tags::
+       Report tags.
+
+--cache::
+       Consider any object recorded in the index also as a head node for
+       an unreachability trace.
+
+--full::
+       Check not just objects in GIT_OBJECT_DIRECTORY
+       ($GIT_DIR/objects), but also the ones found in alternate
+       object pools listed in GIT_ALTERNATE_OBJECT_DIRECTORIES
+       or $GIT_DIR/objects/info/alternates,
+       and in packed git archives found in $GIT_DIR/objects/pack
+       and corresponding pack subdirectories in alternate
+       object pools.
+
+--strict::
+       Enable more strict checking, namely to catch a file mode
+       recorded with g+w bit set, which was created by older
+       versions of git.  Existing repositories, including the
+       Linux kernel, git itself, and sparse repository have old
+       objects that triggers this check, but it is recommended
+       to check new projects with this flag.
+
+It tests SHA1 and general object sanity, and it does full tracking of
+the resulting reachability and everything else. It prints out any
+corruption it finds (missing or bad objects), and if you use the
+'--unreachable' flag it will also print out objects that exist but
+that aren't readable from any of the specified head nodes.
+
+So for example
+
+       git-fsck --unreachable HEAD $(cat .git/refs/heads/*)
+
+will do quite a _lot_ of verification on the tree. There are a few
+extra validity tests to be added (make sure that tree objects are
+sorted properly etc), but on the whole if "git-fsck" is happy, you
+do have a valid tree.
+
+Any corrupt objects you will have to find in backups or other archives
+(i.e., you can just remove them and do an "rsync" with some other site in
+the hopes that somebody else has the object you have corrupted).
+
+Of course, "valid tree" doesn't mean that it wasn't generated by some
+evil person, and the end result might be crap. git is a revision
+tracking system, not a quality assurance system ;)
+
+Extracted Diagnostics
+---------------------
+
+expect dangling commits - potential heads - due to lack of head information::
+       You haven't specified any nodes as heads so it won't be
+       possible to differentiate between un-parented commits and
+       root nodes.
+
+missing sha1 directory '<dir>'::
+       The directory holding the sha1 objects is missing.
+
+unreachable <type> <object>::
+       The <type> object <object>, isn't actually referred to directly
+       or indirectly in any of the trees or commits seen. This can
+       mean that there's another root node that you're not specifying
+       or that the tree is corrupt. If you haven't missed a root node
+       then you might as well delete unreachable nodes since they
+       can't be used.
+
+missing <type> <object>::
+       The <type> object <object>, is referred to but isn't present in
+       the database.
+
+dangling <type> <object>::
+       The <type> object <object>, is present in the database but never
+       'directly' used. A dangling commit could be a root node.
+
+warning: git-fsck: tree <tree> has full pathnames in it::
+       And it shouldn't...
+
+sha1 mismatch <object>::
+       The database has an object who's sha1 doesn't match the
+       database value.
+       This indicates a serious data integrity problem.
+
+Environment Variables
+---------------------
+
+GIT_OBJECT_DIRECTORY::
+       used to specify the object database root (usually $GIT_DIR/objects)
+
+GIT_INDEX_FILE::
+       used to specify the index file of the index
+
+GIT_ALTERNATE_OBJECT_DIRECTORIES::
+       used to specify additional object database roots (usually unset)
+
+Author
+------
+Written by Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
+
+Documentation
+--------------
+Documentation by David Greaves, Junio C Hamano and the git-list <git@vger.kernel.org>.
+
+GIT
+---
+Part of the gitlink:git[7] suite
+
index 73d78c1..bc16584 100644 (file)
@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@ git-gc - Cleanup unnecessary files and optimize the local repository
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
-'git-gc'
+'git-gc' [--prune]
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
@@ -21,6 +21,21 @@ Users are encouraged to run this task on a regular basis within
 each repository to maintain good disk space utilization and good
 operating performance.
 
+OPTIONS
+-------
+
+--prune::
+       Usually `git-gc` packs refs, expires old reflog entries,
+       packs loose objects,
+       and removes old 'rerere' records.  Removal
+       of unreferenced loose objects is an unsafe operation
+       while other git operations are in progress, so it is not
+       done by default.  Pass this option if you want it, and only
+       when you know nobody else is creating new objects in the
+       repository at the same time (e.g. never use this option
+       in a cron script).
+
+
 Configuration
 -------------
 
@@ -35,7 +50,7 @@ can be set to indicate how long historical reflog entries which
 are not part of the current branch should remain available in
 this repository.  These types of entries are generally created as
 a result of using `git commit \--amend` or `git rebase` and are the
-commits prior to the amend or rebase occuring.  Since these changes
+commits prior to the amend or rebase occurring.  Since these changes
 are not part of the current project most users will want to expire
 them sooner.  This option defaults to '30 days'.
 
@@ -47,6 +62,10 @@ The optional configuration variable 'gc.rerereunresolved' indicates
 how long records of conflicted merge you have not resolved are
 kept.  This defaults to 15 days.
 
+The optional configuration variable 'gc.packrefs' determines if
+`git gc` runs `git-pack-refs`.  Without the configuration, `git-pack-refs`
+is not run in bare repositories by default, to allow older dumb-transport
+clients fetch from the repository,  but this will change in the future.
 
 See Also
 --------
index bfbece9..0140c8e 100644 (file)
@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@ OPTIONS
        combined by 'or'.
 
 --and | --or | --not | ( | )::
-       Specify how multiple patterns are combined using boolean
+       Specify how multiple patterns are combined using Boolean
        expressions.  `--or` is the default operator.  `--and` has
        higher precedence than `--or`.  `-e` has to be used for all
        patterns.
index 04e8d00..5edc36f 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-hash-object(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-hash-object - Computes object ID and optionally creates a blob from a file
+git-hash-object - Compute object ID and optionally creates a blob from a file
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index 3d50809..7dc2df3 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-http-fetch(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-http-fetch - downloads a remote git repository via HTTP
+git-http-fetch - Download from a remote git repository via HTTP
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index c2485c6..4b4a461 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-http-push(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-http-push - Push missing objects using HTTP/DAV
+git-http-push - Push objects over HTTP/DAV to another repository
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index bc3ba14..5412135 100644 (file)
@@ -11,96 +11,9 @@ SYNOPSIS
 'git-init-db' [--template=<template_directory>] [--shared[=<permissions>]]
 
 
-OPTIONS
--------
-
---
-
---template=<template_directory>::
-
-Provide the directory from which templates will be used.  The default template
-directory is `/usr/share/git-core/templates`.
-
-When specified, `<template_directory>` is used as the source of the template
-files rather than the default.  The template files include some directory
-structure, some suggested "exclude patterns", and copies of non-executing
-"hook" files.  The suggested patterns and hook files are all modifiable and
-extensible.
-
---shared[={false|true|umask|group|all|world|everybody}]::
-
-Specify that the git repository is to be shared amongst several users.  This
-allows users belonging to the same group to push into that
-repository.  When specified, the config variable "core.sharedRepository" is
-set so that files and directories under `$GIT_DIR` are created with the
-requested permissions.  When not specified, git will use permissions reported
-by umask(2).
-
-The option can have the following values, defaulting to 'group' if no value
-is given:
-
- - 'umask' (or 'false'): Use permissions reported by umask(2). The default,
-   when `--shared` is not specified.
-
- - 'group' (or 'true'): Make the repository group-writable, (and g+sx, since
-   the git group may be not the primary group of all users).
-
- - 'all' (or 'world' or 'everybody'): Same as 'group', but make the repository
-   readable by all users.
-
-By default, the configuration flag receive.denyNonFastforward is enabled
-in shared repositories, so that you cannot force a non fast-forwarding push
-into it.
-
---
-
-
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
-This command creates an empty git repository - basically a `.git` directory
-with subdirectories for `objects`, `refs/heads`, `refs/tags`, and
-template files.
-An initial `HEAD` file that references the HEAD of the master branch
-is also created.
-
-If the `$GIT_DIR` environment variable is set then it specifies a path
-to use instead of `./.git` for the base of the repository.
-
-If the object storage directory is specified via the `$GIT_OBJECT_DIRECTORY`
-environment variable then the sha1 directories are created underneath -
-otherwise the default `$GIT_DIR/objects` directory is used.
-
-Running `git-init-db` in an existing repository is safe. It will not overwrite
-things that are already there. The primary reason for rerunning `git-init-db`
-is to pick up newly added templates.
-
-Note that `git-init` is the same as `git-init-db`.
-
-
-EXAMPLES
---------
-
-Start a new git repository for an existing code base::
-+
-----------------
-$ cd /path/to/my/codebase
-$ git-init-db   <1>
-$ git-add .     <2>
-----------------
-+
-<1> prepare /path/to/my/codebase/.git directory
-<2> add all existing file to the index
-
-
-Author
-------
-Written by Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
-
-Documentation
---------------
-Documentation by David Greaves, Junio C Hamano and the git-list <git@vger.kernel.org>.
 
-GIT
----
-Part of the gitlink:git[7] suite
+This is a synonym for gitlink:git-init[1].  Please refer to the
+documentation of that command.
 
diff --git a/Documentation/git-init.txt b/Documentation/git-init.txt
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..1b64d3a
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,111 @@
+git-init(1)
+===========
+
+NAME
+----
+git-init - Create an empty git repository or reinitialize an existing one
+
+
+SYNOPSIS
+--------
+'git-init' [--template=<template_directory>] [--shared[=<permissions>]]
+
+
+OPTIONS
+-------
+
+--
+
+--template=<template_directory>::
+
+Provide the directory from which templates will be used.  The default template
+directory is `/usr/share/git-core/templates`.
+
+When specified, `<template_directory>` is used as the source of the template
+files rather than the default.  The template files include some directory
+structure, some suggested "exclude patterns", and copies of non-executing
+"hook" files.  The suggested patterns and hook files are all modifiable and
+extensible.
+
+--shared[={false|true|umask|group|all|world|everybody}]::
+
+Specify that the git repository is to be shared amongst several users.  This
+allows users belonging to the same group to push into that
+repository.  When specified, the config variable "core.sharedRepository" is
+set so that files and directories under `$GIT_DIR` are created with the
+requested permissions.  When not specified, git will use permissions reported
+by umask(2).
+
+The option can have the following values, defaulting to 'group' if no value
+is given:
+
+ - 'umask' (or 'false'): Use permissions reported by umask(2). The default,
+   when `--shared` is not specified.
+
+ - 'group' (or 'true'): Make the repository group-writable, (and g+sx, since
+   the git group may be not the primary group of all users).
+
+ - 'all' (or 'world' or 'everybody'): Same as 'group', but make the repository
+   readable by all users.
+
+By default, the configuration flag receive.denyNonFastforward is enabled
+in shared repositories, so that you cannot force a non fast-forwarding push
+into it.
+
+--
+
+
+DESCRIPTION
+-----------
+This command creates an empty git repository - basically a `.git` directory
+with subdirectories for `objects`, `refs/heads`, `refs/tags`, and
+template files.
+An initial `HEAD` file that references the HEAD of the master branch
+is also created.
+
+If the `$GIT_DIR` environment variable is set then it specifies a path
+to use instead of `./.git` for the base of the repository.
+
+If the object storage directory is specified via the `$GIT_OBJECT_DIRECTORY`
+environment variable then the sha1 directories are created underneath -
+otherwise the default `$GIT_DIR/objects` directory is used.
+
+Running `git-init` in an existing repository is safe. It will not overwrite
+things that are already there. The primary reason for rerunning `git-init`
+is to pick up newly added templates.
+
+Note that `git-init` is the same as `git-init-db`.  The command
+was primarily meant to initialize the object database, but over
+time it has become responsible for setting up the other aspects
+of the repository, such as installing the default hooks and
+setting the configuration variables.  The old name is retained
+for backward compatibility reasons.
+
+
+EXAMPLES
+--------
+
+Start a new git repository for an existing code base::
++
+----------------
+$ cd /path/to/my/codebase
+$ git-init      <1>
+$ git-add .     <2>
+----------------
++
+<1> prepare /path/to/my/codebase/.git directory
+<2> add all existing file to the index
+
+
+Author
+------
+Written by Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
+
+Documentation
+--------------
+Documentation by David Greaves, Junio C Hamano and the git-list <git@vger.kernel.org>.
+
+GIT
+---
+Part of the gitlink:git[7] suite
+
index 7dd393b..52a6aa6 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-instaweb(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-instaweb - instantly browse your working repository in gitweb
+git-instaweb - Instantly browse your working repository in gitweb
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
index 2fbdfe0..22048d8 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-local-fetch(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-local-fetch - Duplicates another git repository on a local system
+git-local-fetch - Duplicate another git repository on a local system
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index e9f746b..361eaec 100644 (file)
@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ Shows the commit logs.
 
 The command takes options applicable to the gitlink:git-rev-list[1]
 command to control what is shown and how, and options applicable to
-the gitlink:git-diff-tree[1] commands to control how the change
+the gitlink:git-diff-tree[1] commands to control how the changes
 each commit introduces are shown.
 
 This manual page describes only the most frequently used options.
@@ -27,13 +27,16 @@ OPTIONS
 
 include::pretty-formats.txt[]
 
---max-count=<n>::
+-<n>::
        Limits the number of commits to show.
 
 <since>..<until>::
        Show only commits between the named two commits.  When
        either <since> or <until> is omitted, it defaults to
        `HEAD`, i.e. the tip of the current branch.
+       For a more complete list of ways to spell <since>
+       and <until>, see "SPECIFYING REVISIONS" section in
+       gitlink:git-rev-parse[1].
 
 -p::
        Show the change the commit introduces in a patch form.
index 8520b97..79e0b7b 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-ls-files(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-ls-files - Information about files in the index/working directory
+git-ls-files - Show information about files in the index and the working tree
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index c8a4c5a..c254005 100644 (file)
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ OPTIONS
 -u <exec>, --upload-pack=<exec>::
        Specify the full path of gitlink:git-upload-pack[1] on the remote
        host. This allows listing references from repositories accessed via
-       SSH and where the SSH deamon does not use the PATH configured by the
+       SSH and where the SSH daemon does not use the PATH configured by the
        user. Also see the '--exec' option for gitlink:git-peek-remote[1].
 
 <repository>::
index f283bac..7899394 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-ls-tree(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-ls-tree - Lists the contents of a tree object
+git-ls-tree - List the contents of a tree object
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index ea0a065..ba18133 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-mailinfo(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-mailinfo - Extracts patch from a single e-mail message
+git-mailinfo - Extracts patch and authorship from a single e-mail message
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@ writes the commit log message in <msg> file, and the patches in
 <patch> file.  The author name, e-mail and e-mail subject are
 written out to the standard output to be used by git-applypatch
 to create a commit.  It is usually not necessary to use this
-command directly.
+command directly.  See gitlink:git-am[1] instead.
 
 
 OPTIONS
@@ -33,15 +33,13 @@ OPTIONS
        format-patch --mbox' output.
 
 -u::
-       By default, the commit log message, author name and
-       author email are taken from the e-mail without any
-       charset conversion, after minimally decoding MIME
-       transfer encoding.  This flag causes the resulting
-       commit to be encoded in the encoding specified by
-       i18n.commitencoding configuration (defaults to utf-8) by
-       transliterating them. 
-       Note that the patch is always used as is without charset
-       conversion, even with this flag.
+       The commit log message, author name and author email are
+       taken from the e-mail, and after minimally decoding MIME
+       transfer encoding, re-coded in UTF-8 by transliterating
+       them.  This used to be optional but now it is the default.
++
+Note that the patch is always used as-is without charset
+conversion, even with this flag.
 
 --encoding=<encoding>::
        Similar to -u but if the local convention is different
index 5a17801..c11d6a5 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-mailsplit(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-mailsplit - Totally braindamaged mbox splitter program
+git-mailsplit - Simple UNIX mbox splitter program
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
index 6099be2..3190aed 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-merge-base(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-merge-base - Finds as good a common ancestor as possible for a merge
+git-merge-base - Find as good common ancestors as possible for a merge
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index 29d3faa..31882ab 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-merge-file(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-merge-file - three-way file merge
+git-merge-file - Run a three-way file merge
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index 0cf505e..b8ee1ff 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-merge-index(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-merge-index - Runs a merge for files needing merging
+git-merge-index - Run a merge for files needing merging
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index 86aad37..f80ab3b 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-merge-one-file(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-merge-one-file - The standard helper program to use with "git-merge-index"
+git-merge-one-file - The standard helper program to use with git-merge-index
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index 0f79665..e53ff4b 100644 (file)
@@ -3,14 +3,14 @@ git-merge(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-merge - Grand Unified Merge Driver
+git-merge - Join two or more development histories together
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
 [verse]
 'git-merge' [-n] [--no-commit] [--squash] [-s <strategy>]...
-       -m=<msg> <remote> <remote>...
+       [-m <msg>] <remote> <remote>...
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
index 207c43a..6756b76 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-mv(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-mv - Move or rename a file, directory or symlink
+git-mv - Move or rename a file, a directory, or a symlink
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index ee9e8fa..6edb9f1 100644 (file)
@@ -93,7 +93,7 @@ perforce branch into a branch named "jammy", like so:
 ------------
 $ mkdir -p /home/sean/import/jam
 $ cd /home/sean/import/jam
-$ git init-db
+$ git init
 $ git p4import //public/jam jammy
 ------------
 
index 7d54b17..94bbea0 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-pack-redundant(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-pack-redundant - Program used to find redundant pack files
+git-pack-redundant - Find redundant pack files
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ given will be ignored when checking which packs are required. This makes the
 following command useful when wanting to remove packs which contain unreachable
 objects.
 
-git-fsck-objects --full --unreachable | cut -d ' ' -f3 | \
+git-fsck --full --unreachable | cut -d ' ' -f3 | \
 git-pack-redundant --all | xargs rm
 
 OPTIONS
index 464269f..a20fc7d 100644 (file)
@@ -29,12 +29,23 @@ file and used if found.
 Subsequent updates to branches always creates new file under
 `$GIT_DIR/refs` hierarchy.
 
+A recommended practice to deal with a repository with too many
+refs is to pack its refs with `--all --prune` once, and
+occasionally run `git-pack-refs \--prune`.  Tags are by
+definition stationary and are not expected to change.  Branch
+heads will be packed with the initial `pack-refs --all`, but
+only the currently active branch heads will become unpacked,
+and next `pack-refs` (without `--all`) will leave them
+unpacked.
+
+
 OPTIONS
 -------
 
 \--all::
 
-The command by default packs all tags and leaves branch tips
+The command by default packs all tags and refs that are already
+packed, and leaves other refs
 alone.  This is because branches are expected to be actively
 developed and packing their tips does not help performance.
 This option causes branch tips to be packed as well.  Useful for
index fc27afe..11b1f4d 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-parse-remote(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-parse-remote - Routines to help parsing $GIT_DIR/remotes/
+git-parse-remote - Routines to help parsing remote repository access parameters
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
@@ -14,7 +14,8 @@ DESCRIPTION
 -----------
 This script is included in various scripts to supply
 routines to parse files under $GIT_DIR/remotes/ and
-$GIT_DIR/branches/.
+$GIT_DIR/branches/ and configuration variables that are related
+to fetching, pulling and pushing.
 
 The primary entry points are:
 
@@ -25,7 +26,8 @@ get_remote_refs_for_fetch::
        (e.g. `refs/heads/foo`).  When `<refspec>...` is empty
        the returned list of refs consists of the defaults
        for the given `<repo>`, if specified in
-       `$GIT_DIR/remotes/` or `$GIT_DIR/branches/`.
+       `$GIT_DIR/remotes/`, `$GIT_DIR/branches/`, or `remote.*.fetch`
+       configuration.
 
 get_remote_refs_for_push::
        Given the list of user-supplied `<repo> <refspec>...`,
index 5389097..a7e9fd0 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-patch-id(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-patch-id - Generate a patch ID
+git-patch-id - Compute unique ID for a patch
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
index a00060c..74f37bd 100644 (file)
@@ -3,12 +3,12 @@ git-peek-remote(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-peek-remote - Lists the references in a remote repository
+git-peek-remote - List the references in a remote repository
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
-'git-peek-remote' [--exec=<git-upload-pack>] [<host>:]<directory>
+'git-peek-remote' [--upload-pack=<git-upload-pack>] [<host>:]<directory>
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ stores them in the local repository under the same name.
 
 OPTIONS
 -------
---exec=<git-upload-pack>::
+\--upload-pack=<git-upload-pack>::
        Use this to specify the path to 'git-upload-pack' on the
        remote side, if it is not found on your $PATH. Some
        installations of sshd ignores the user's environment
@@ -29,6 +29,9 @@ OPTIONS
        shells, but prefer having a lean .bashrc file (they set most of
        the things up in .bash_profile).
 
+\--exec=<git-upload-pack>::
+       Same \--upload-pack=<git-upload-pack>.
+
 <host>::
        A remote host that houses the repository.  When this
        part is specified, 'git-upload-pack' is invoked via
index 2348826..310033e 100644 (file)
@@ -3,13 +3,12 @@ git-prune-packed(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-prune-packed - Program used to remove the extra object files that are now
-residing in a pack file.
+git-prune-packed - Remove extra objects that are already in pack files
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
-'git-prune-packed' [-n]
+'git-prune-packed' [-n] [-q]
 
 
 DESCRIPTION
@@ -32,6 +31,9 @@ OPTIONS
         Don't actually remove any objects, only show those that would have been
         removed.
 
+-q::
+       Squelch the progress indicator.
+
 Author
 ------
 Written by Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
index a11e303..0b44f30 100644 (file)
@@ -13,7 +13,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
 
-This runs `git-fsck-objects --unreachable` using all the refs
+This runs `git-fsck --unreachable` using all the refs
 available in `$GIT_DIR/refs`, optionally with additional set of
 objects specified on the command line, and prunes all
 objects unreachable from any of these head objects from the object database.
index 13be992..94478ed 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-pull(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-pull - Pull and merge from another repository or a local branch
+git-pull - Fetch from and merge with another repository or a local branch
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
@@ -33,6 +33,60 @@ include::urls.txt[]
 
 include::merge-strategies.txt[]
 
+DEFAULT BEHAVIOUR
+-----------------
+
+Often people use `git pull` without giving any parameter.
+Traditionally, this has been equivalent to saying `git pull
+origin`.  However, when configuration `branch.<name>.remote` is
+present while on branch `<name>`, that value is used instead of
+`origin`.
+
+In order to determine what URL to use to fetch from, the value
+of the configuration `remote.<origin>.url` is consulted
+and if there is not any such variable, the value on `URL: ` line
+in `$GIT_DIR/remotes/<origin>` file is used.
+
+In order to determine what remote branches to fetch (and
+optionally store in the tracking branches) when the command is
+run without any refspec parameters on the command line, values
+of the configuration variable `remote.<origin>.fetch` are
+consulted, and if there aren't any, `$GIT_DIR/remotes/<origin>`
+file is consulted and its `Pull: ` lines are used.
+In addition to the refspec formats described in the OPTIONS
+section, you can have a globbing refspec that looks like this:
+
+------------
+refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*
+------------
+
+A globbing refspec must have a non-empty RHS (i.e. must store
+what were fetched in tracking branches), and its LHS and RHS
+must end with `/*`.  The above specifies that all remote
+branches are tracked using tracking branches in
+`refs/remotes/origin/` hierarchy under the same name.
+
+The rule to determine which remote branch to merge after
+fetching is a bit involved, in order not to break backward
+compatibility.
+
+If explicit refspecs were given on the command
+line of `git pull`, they are all merged.
+
+When no refspec was given on the command line, then `git pull`
+uses the refspec from the configuration or
+`$GIT_DIR/remotes/<origin>`.  In such cases, the following
+rules apply:
+
+. If `branch.<name>.merge` configuration for the current
+  branch `<name>` exists, that is the name of the branch at the
+  remote site that is merged.
+
+. If the refspec is a globbing one, nothing is merged.
+
+. Otherwise the remote branch of the first refspec is merged.
+
+
 EXAMPLES
 --------
 
@@ -42,7 +96,7 @@ git pull, git pull origin::
        current branch.  Normally the branch merged in is
        the HEAD of the remote repository, but the choice is
        determined by the branch.<name>.remote and
-       branch.<name>.merge options; see gitlink:git-repo-config[1]
+       branch.<name>.merge options; see gitlink:git-config[1]
        for details.
 
 git pull origin next::
@@ -52,7 +106,8 @@ git pull origin next::
 
 git pull . fixes enhancements::
        Bundle local branch `fixes` and `enhancements` on top of
-       the current branch, making an Octopus merge.
+       the current branch, making an Octopus merge.  This `git pull .`
+       syntax is equivalent to `git merge`.
 
 git pull -s ours . obsolete::
        Merge local branch `obsolete` into the current branch,
@@ -93,7 +148,7 @@ gitlink:git-reset[1].
 
 SEE ALSO
 --------
-gitlink:git-fetch[1], gitlink:git-merge[1], gitlink:git-repo-config[1]
+gitlink:git-fetch[1], gitlink:git-merge[1], gitlink:git-config[1]
 
 
 Author
index 197f4b5..f8cc2b5 100644 (file)
@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@ git-push - Update remote refs along with associated objects
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
-'git-push' [--all] [--tags] [-f | --force] <repository> <refspec>...
+'git-push' [--all] [--tags] [--receive-pack=<git-receive-pack>] [--repo=all] [-f | --force] [-v] [<repository> <refspec>...]
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
@@ -67,12 +67,33 @@ the remote repository.
        addition to refspecs explicitly listed on the command
        line.
 
+\--receive-pack=<git-receive-pack>::
+       Path to the 'git-receive-pack' program on the remote
+       end.  Sometimes useful when pushing to a remote
+       repository over ssh, and you do not have the program in
+       a directory on the default $PATH.
+
+\--exec=<git-receive-pack>::
+       Same as \--receive-pack=<git-receive-pack>.
+
 -f, \--force::
        Usually, the command refuses to update a remote ref that is
        not a descendant of the local ref used to overwrite it.
        This flag disables the check.  This can cause the
        remote repository to lose commits; use it with care.
 
+\--repo=<repo>::
+       When no repository is specified the command defaults to
+       "origin"; this overrides it.
+
+\--thin, \--no-thin::
+       These options are passed to `git-send-pack`.  Thin
+       transfer spends extra cycles to minimize the number of
+       objects to be sent and meant to be used on slower connection.
+
+-v::
+       Run verbosely.
+
 include::urls.txt[]
 
 Author
index 03e867a..f2ef1f7 100644 (file)
@@ -3,11 +3,11 @@ git-rebase(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-rebase - Rebase local commits to a new head
+git-rebase - Forward-port local commits to the updated upstream head
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
-'git-rebase' [-v] [--merge] [--onto <newbase>] <upstream> [<branch>]
+'git-rebase' [-v] [--merge] [-C<n>] [--onto <newbase>] <upstream> [<branch>]
 
 'git-rebase' --continue | --skip | --abort
 
@@ -114,6 +114,27 @@ would result in:
 
 This is useful when topicB does not depend on topicA.
 
+A range of commits could also be removed with rebase.  If we have
+the following situation:
+
+------------
+    E---F---G---H---I---J  topicA
+------------
+
+then the command
+
+    git-rebase --onto topicA~5 topicA~2 topicA
+
+would result in the removal of commits F and G:
+
+------------
+    E---H'---I'---J'  topicA
+------------
+
+This is useful if F and G were flawed in some way, or should not be
+part of topicA.  Note that the argument to --onto and the <upstream>
+parameter can be any valid commit-ish.
+
 In case of conflict, git-rebase will stop at the first problematic commit
 and leave conflict markers in the tree.  You can use git diff to locate
 the markers (<<<<<<) and make edits to resolve the conflict.  For each
@@ -141,10 +162,12 @@ OPTIONS
 <newbase>::
        Starting point at which to create the new commits. If the
        --onto option is not specified, the starting point is
-       <upstream>.
+       <upstream>.  May be any valid commit, and not just an
+       existing branch name.
 
 <upstream>::
-       Upstream branch to compare against.
+       Upstream branch to compare against.  May be any valid commit,
+       not just an existing branch name.
 
 <branch>::
        Working branch; defaults to HEAD.
@@ -173,6 +196,12 @@ OPTIONS
 -v, \--verbose::
        Display a diffstat of what changed upstream since the last rebase.
 
+-C<n>::
+       Ensure at least <n> lines of surrounding context match before
+       and after each change.  When fewer lines of surrounding
+       context exist they all must match.  By default no context is
+       ever ignored.
+
 include::merge-strategies.txt[]
 
 NOTES
index 0dfadc2..10e8c46 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-receive-pack(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-receive-pack - Receive what is pushed into it
+git-receive-pack - Receive what is pushed into the repository
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index 55a24d3..1e343bc 100644 (file)
@@ -8,13 +8,18 @@ git-reflog - Manage reflog information
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
-[verse]
-'git-reflog' expire [--dry-run]
-       [--expire=<time>] [--expire-unreachable=<time>] [--all] <refs>...
-
+'git reflog' <subcommand> <options>
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
+The command takes various subcommands, and different options
+depending on the subcommand:
+
+[verse]
+git reflog expire [--dry-run] [--stale-fix]
+       [--expire=<time>] [--expire-unreachable=<time>] [--all] <refs>...
+
+git reflog [show] [log-options]
 
 Reflog is a mechanism to record when the tip of branches are
 updated.  This command is to manage the information recorded in it.
@@ -25,6 +30,10 @@ Entries older than `expire` time, or entries older than
 tip, are removed from the reflog.  This is typically not used
 directly by the end users -- instead, see gitlink:git-gc[1].
 
+The subcommand "show" (which is also the default, in the absense of any
+subcommands) will take all the normal log options, and show the log of
+the current branch. It is basically an alias for 'git log -g --abbrev-commit
+--pretty=oneline', see gitlink:git-log[1].
 
 
 OPTIONS
index 5b93a8c..a60c31a 100644 (file)
@@ -12,23 +12,43 @@ SYNOPSIS
 'git-remote'
 'git-remote' add <name> <url>
 'git-remote' show <name>
+'git-remote' prune <name>
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
 
 Manage the set of repositories ("remotes") whose branches you track.
 
-With no arguments, shows a list of existing remotes.
 
-In the second form, adds a remote named <name> for the repository at
+COMMANDS
+--------
+
+With no arguments, shows a list of existing remotes.  Several
+subcommands are available to perform operations on the remotes.
+
+'add'::
+
+Adds a remote named <name> for the repository at
 <url>.  The command `git fetch <name>` can then be used to create and
 update remote-tracking branches <name>/<branch>.
 
-In the third form, gives some information about the remote <name>.
+'show'::
+
+Gives some information about the remote <name>.
+
+'prune'::
+
+Deletes all stale tracking branches under <name>.
+These stale branches have already been removed from the remote repository
+referenced by <name>, but are still locally available in "remotes/<name>".
+
+
+DISCUSSION
+----------
 
 The remote configuration is achieved using the `remote.origin.url` and
 `remote.origin.fetch` configuration variables.  (See
-gitlink:git-repo-config[1]).
+gitlink:git-config[1]).
 
 Examples
 --------
@@ -58,7 +78,7 @@ See Also
 --------
 gitlink:git-fetch[1]
 gitlink:git-branch[1]
-gitlink:git-repo-config[1]
+gitlink:git-config[1]
 
 Author
 ------
index 0fa47e3..d39abc1 100644 (file)
@@ -3,8 +3,7 @@ git-repack(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-repack - Script used to pack a repository from a collection of
-objects into pack files.
+git-repack - Pack unpacked objects in a repository
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
@@ -31,9 +30,9 @@ OPTIONS
        Instead of incrementally packing the unpacked objects,
        pack everything available into a single pack.
        Especially useful when packing a repository that is used
-       for a private development and there no need to worry
-       about people fetching via dumb protocols from it.  Use
-       with '-d'.
+       for private development and there is no need to worry
+       about people fetching via dumb file transfer protocols
+       from it.  Use with '-d'.
 
 -d::
        After packing, if the newly created packs make some
index c55a8ba..2deba31 100644 (file)
@@ -3,225 +3,16 @@ git-repo-config(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-repo-config - Get and set repository or global options.
+git-repo-config - Get and set repository or global options
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
-[verse]
-'git-repo-config' [--global] [type] name [value [value_regex]]
-'git-repo-config' [--global] [type] --add name value
-'git-repo-config' [--global] [type] --replace-all name [value [value_regex]]
-'git-repo-config' [--global] [type] --get name [value_regex]
-'git-repo-config' [--global] [type] --get-all name [value_regex]
-'git-repo-config' [--global] [type] --unset name [value_regex]
-'git-repo-config' [--global] [type] --unset-all name [value_regex]
-'git-repo-config' [--global] -l | --list
+'git-repo-config' ...
 
-DESCRIPTION
------------
-You can query/set/replace/unset options with this command. The name is
-actually the section and the key separated by a dot, and the value will be
-escaped.
-
-Multiple lines can be added to an option by using the '--add' option.
-If you want to update or unset an option which can occur on multiple
-lines, a POSIX regexp `value_regex` needs to be given.  Only the
-existing values that match the regexp are updated or unset.  If
-you want to handle the lines that do *not* match the regex, just
-prepend a single exclamation mark in front (see EXAMPLES).
-
-The type specifier can be either '--int' or '--bool', which will make
-'git-repo-config' ensure that the variable(s) are of the given type and
-convert the value to the canonical form (simple decimal number for int,
-a "true" or "false" string for bool). If no type specifier is passed,
-no checks or transformations are performed on the value.
-
-This command will fail if:
-
-. The .git/config file is invalid,
-. Can not write to .git/config,
-. no section was provided,
-. the section or key is invalid,
-. you try to unset an option which does not exist,
-. you try to unset/set an option for which multiple lines match, or
-. you use --global option without $HOME being properly set.
-
-
-OPTIONS
--------
-
---replace-all::
-       Default behavior is to replace at most one line. This replaces
-       all lines matching the key (and optionally the value_regex).
-
---add::
-       Adds a new line to the option without altering any existing
-       values.  This is the same as providing '^$' as the value_regex.
-
---get::
-       Get the value for a given key (optionally filtered by a regex
-       matching the value). Returns error code 1 if the key was not
-       found and error code 2 if multiple key values were found.
-
---get-all::
-       Like get, but does not fail if the number of values for the key
-       is not exactly one.
-
---get-regexp::
-       Like --get-all, but interprets the name as a regular expression.
-
---global::
-       Use global ~/.gitconfig file rather than the repository .git/config.
-
---unset::
-       Remove the line matching the key from config file.
 
---unset-all::
-       Remove all matching lines from config file.
-
--l, --list::
-       List all variables set in config file.
-
---bool::
-       git-repo-config will ensure that the output is "true" or "false"
-
---int::
-       git-repo-config will ensure that the output is a simple
-       decimal number.  An optional value suffix of 'k', 'm', or 'g'
-       in the config file will cause the value to be multiplied
-       by 1024, 1048576, or 1073741824 prior to output.
-
-
-ENVIRONMENT
+DESCRIPTION
 -----------
 
-GIT_CONFIG::
-       Take the configuration from the given file instead of .git/config.
-       Using the "--global" option forces this to ~/.gitconfig.
-
-GIT_CONFIG_LOCAL::
-       Currently the same as $GIT_CONFIG; when Git will support global
-       configuration files, this will cause it to take the configuration
-       from the global configuration file in addition to the given file.
-
-
-EXAMPLE
--------
-
-Given a .git/config like this:
-
-       #
-       # This is the config file, and
-       # a '#' or ';' character indicates
-       # a comment
-       #
-
-       ; core variables
-       [core]
-               ; Don't trust file modes
-               filemode = false
-
-       ; Our diff algorithm
-       [diff]
-               external = "/usr/local/bin/gnu-diff -u"
-               renames = true
-
-       ; Proxy settings
-       [core]
-               gitproxy="ssh" for "ssh://kernel.org/"
-               gitproxy="proxy-command" for kernel.org
-               gitproxy="myprotocol-command" for "my://"
-               gitproxy=default-proxy ; for all the rest
-
-you can set the filemode to true with
-
-------------
-% git repo-config core.filemode true
-------------
-
-The hypothetical proxy command entries actually have a postfix to discern
-what URL they apply to. Here is how to change the entry for kernel.org
-to "ssh".
-
-------------
-% git repo-config core.gitproxy '"ssh" for kernel.org' 'for kernel.org$'
-------------
-
-This makes sure that only the key/value pair for kernel.org is replaced.
-
-To delete the entry for renames, do
-
-------------
-% git repo-config --unset diff.renames
-------------
-
-If you want to delete an entry for a multivar (like core.gitproxy above),
-you have to provide a regex matching the value of exactly one line.
-
-To query the value for a given key, do
-
-------------
-% git repo-config --get core.filemode
-------------
-
-or
-
-------------
-% git repo-config core.filemode
-------------
-
-or, to query a multivar:
-
-------------
-% git repo-config --get core.gitproxy "for kernel.org$"
-------------
-
-If you want to know all the values for a multivar, do:
-
-------------
-% git repo-config --get-all core.gitproxy
-------------
-
-If you like to live dangerous, you can replace *all* core.gitproxy by a
-new one with
-
-------------
-% git repo-config --replace-all core.gitproxy ssh
-------------
-
-However, if you really only want to replace the line for the default proxy,
-i.e. the one without a "for ..." postfix, do something like this:
-
-------------
-% git repo-config core.gitproxy ssh '! for '
-------------
-
-To actually match only values with an exclamation mark, you have to
-
-------------
-% git repo-config section.key value '[!]'
-------------
-
-To add a new proxy, without altering any of the existing ones, use
-
-------------
-% git repo-config core.gitproxy '"proxy" for example.com'
-------------
-
-
-include::config.txt[]
-
-
-Author
-------
-Written by Johannes Schindelin <Johannes.Schindelin@gmx.de>
-
-Documentation
---------------
-Documentation by Johannes Schindelin, Petr Baudis and the git-list <git@vger.kernel.org>.
-
-GIT
----
-Part of the gitlink:git[7] suite
-
+This is a synonym for gitlink:git-config[1].  Please refer to the
+documentation of that command.
index b57a72b..139b6eb 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-rerere(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-rerere - Reuse recorded resolve
+git-rerere - Reuse recorded resolution of conflicted merges
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ its working state.
 
 This resets the metadata used by rerere if a merge resolution is to be
 is aborted.  Calling gitlink:git-am[1] --skip or gitlink:git-rebase[1]
-[--skip|--abort] will automatcally invoke this command.
+[--skip|--abort] will automatically invoke this command.
 
 'diff'::
 
@@ -81,7 +81,7 @@ One way to do it is to pull master into the topic branch:
 
 ------------
        $ git checkout topic
-       $ git pull . master
+       $ git merge master
 
               o---*---o---+ topic
              /           /
@@ -103,10 +103,10 @@ in which case the final commit graph would look like this:
 
 ------------
        $ git checkout topic
-       $ git pull . master
+       $ git merge master
        $ ... work on both topic and master branches
        $ git checkout master
-       $ git pull . topic
+       $ git merge topic
 
               o---*---o---+---o---o topic
              /           /         \
@@ -126,11 +126,11 @@ top of the tip before the test merge:
 
 ------------
        $ git checkout topic
-       $ git pull . master
+       $ git merge master
        $ git reset --hard HEAD^ ;# rewind the test merge
        $ ... work on both topic and master branches
        $ git checkout master
-       $ git pull . topic
+       $ git merge topic
 
               o---*---o-------o---o topic
              /                     \
index 4f42478..04475a9 100644 (file)
@@ -121,10 +121,6 @@ Undo a merge or pull::
 +
 ------------
 $ git pull                         <1>
-Trying really trivial in-index merge...
-fatal: Merge requires file-level merging
-Nope.
-...
 Auto-merging nitfol
 CONFLICT (content): Merge conflict in nitfol
 Automatic merge failed/prevented; fix up by hand
diff --git a/Documentation/git-resolve.txt b/Documentation/git-resolve.txt
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 4e57c2b..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,36 +0,0 @@
-git-resolve(1)
-==============
-
-NAME
-----
-git-resolve - Merge two commits
-
-
-SYNOPSIS
---------
-'git-resolve' <current> <merged> <message>
-
-DESCRIPTION
------------
-Given two commits and a merge message, merge the <merged> commit
-into <current> commit, with the commit log message <message>.
-
-When <current> is a descendant of <merged>, or <current> is an
-ancestor of <merged>, no new commit is created and the <message>
-is ignored.  The former is informally called "already up to
-date", and the latter is often called "fast forward".
-
-
-Author
-------
-Written by Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org> and
-Dan Holmsand <holmsand@gmail.com>.
-
-Documentation
---------------
-Documentation by David Greaves, Junio C Hamano and the git-list <git@vger.kernel.org>.
-
-GIT
----
-Part of the gitlink:git[7] suite
-
index 86c94e7..c742117 100644 (file)
@@ -27,6 +27,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
             [ \--pretty | \--header ]
             [ \--bisect ]
             [ \--merge ]
+            [ \--walk-reflogs ]
             <commit>... [ \-- <paths>... ]
 
 DESCRIPTION
@@ -190,6 +191,22 @@ limiting may be applied.
        In addition to the '<commit>' listed on the command
        line, read them from the standard input.
 
+-g, --walk-reflogs::
+
+       Instead of walking the commit ancestry chain, walk
+       reflog entries from the most recent one to older ones.
+       When this option is used you cannot specify commits to
+       exclude (that is, '{caret}commit', 'commit1..commit2',
+       nor 'commit1...commit2' notations cannot be used).
++
+With '\--pretty' format other than oneline (for obvious reasons),
+this causes the output to have two extra lines of information
+taken from the reflog.  By default, 'commit@{Nth}' notation is
+used in the output.  When the starting commit is specified as
+'commit@{now}', output also uses 'commit@{timestamp}' notation
+instead.  Under '\--pretty=oneline', the commit message is
+prefixed with this information on the same line.
+
 --merge::
 
        After a failed merge, show refs that touch files having a
index 4eaf5a0..4041a16 100644 (file)
@@ -152,6 +152,18 @@ blobs contained in a commit.
   used immediately following a ref name and the ref must have an
   existing log ($GIT_DIR/logs/<ref>).
 
+* A ref followed by the suffix '@' with an ordinal specification
+  enclosed in a brace pair (e.g. '\{1\}', '\{15\}') to specify
+  the n-th prior value of that ref.  For example 'master@\{1\}'
+  is the immediate prior value of 'master' while 'master@\{5\}'
+  is the 5th prior value of 'master'. This suffix may only be used
+  immediately following a ref name and the ref must have an existing
+  log ($GIT_DIR/logs/<ref>).
+
+* You can use the '@' construct with an empty ref part to get at a
+  reflog of the current branch. For example, if you are on the
+  branch 'blabla', then '@\{1\}' means the same as 'blabla@\{1\}'.
+
 * A suffix '{caret}' to a revision parameter means the first parent of
   that commit object.  '{caret}<n>' means the <n>th parent (i.e.
   'rev{caret}'
index 71f7815..8081bba 100644 (file)
@@ -19,6 +19,8 @@ OPTIONS
 -------
 <commit>::
        Commit to revert.
+       For a more complete list of ways to spell commit names, see
+       "SPECIFYING REVISIONS" section in gitlink:git-rev-parse[1].
 
 -e|--edit::
        With this option, `git-revert` will let you edit the commit
index 3a8f279..6feebc0 100644 (file)
@@ -60,21 +60,17 @@ a file that you have not told git about does not remove that file.
 EXAMPLES
 --------
 git-rm Documentation/\\*.txt::
-
        Removes all `\*.txt` files from the index that are under the
-       `Documentation` directory and any of its subdirectories. The
-       files are not removed from the working tree.
+       `Documentation` directory and any of its subdirectories.
 +
 Note that the asterisk `\*` is quoted from the shell in this
 example; this lets the command include the files from
 subdirectories of `Documentation/` directory.
 
 git-rm -f git-*.sh::
-
-       Remove all git-*.sh scripts that are in the index. The files
-       are removed from the index, and from the working
-       tree. Because this example lets the shell expand the
-       asterisk (i.e. you are listing the files explicitly), it
+       Remove all git-*.sh scripts that are in the index.
+       Because this example lets the shell expand the asterisk
+       (i.e. you are listing the files explicitly), it
        does not remove `subdir/git-foo.sh`.
 
 See Also
index 5376f68..205bfd2 100644 (file)
@@ -3,38 +3,51 @@ git-send-pack(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-send-pack - Push missing objects packed
+git-send-pack - Push objects over git protocol to another repository
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
-'git-send-pack' [--all] [--force] [--exec=<git-receive-pack>] [<host>:]<directory> [<ref>...]
+'git-send-pack' [--all] [--force] [--receive-pack=<git-receive-pack>] [--verbose] [--thin] [<host>:]<directory> [<ref>...]
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
+Usually you would want to use gitlink:git-push[1] which is a
+higher level wrapper of this command instead.
+
 Invokes 'git-receive-pack' on a possibly remote repository, and
 updates it from the current repository, sending named refs.
 
 
 OPTIONS
 -------
---exec=<git-receive-pack>::
+\--receive-pack=<git-receive-pack>::
        Path to the 'git-receive-pack' program on the remote
        end.  Sometimes useful when pushing to a remote
        repository over ssh, and you do not have the program in
        a directory on the default $PATH.
 
---all::
+\--exec=<git-receive-pack>::
+       Same as \--receive-pack=<git-receive-pack>.
+
+\--all::
        Instead of explicitly specifying which refs to update,
        update all refs that locally exist.
 
---force::
+\--force::
        Usually, the command refuses to update a remote ref that
        is not an ancestor of the local ref used to overwrite it.
        This flag disables the check.  What this means is that
        the remote repository can lose commits; use it with
        care.
 
+\--verbose::
+       Run verbosely.
+
+\--thin::
+       Spend extra cycles to minimize the number of objects to be sent.
+       Use it on slower connection.
+
 <host>::
        A remote host to house the repository.  When this
        part is specified, 'git-receive-pack' is invoked via
index 79217d8..2b2abeb 100644 (file)
@@ -12,14 +12,51 @@ SYNOPSIS
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
 
-Sets up the normal git environment variables and a few helper functions
-(currently just "die()"), and returns OK if it all looks like a git archive.
-So, to make the rest of the git scripts more careful and readable,
-use it as follows:
-
--------------------------------------------------
-. git-sh-setup || die "Not a git archive"
--------------------------------------------------
+This is not a command the end user would want to run.  Ever.
+This documentation is meant for people who are studying the
+Porcelain-ish scripts and/or are writing new ones.
+
+The `git-sh-setup` scriptlet is designed to be sourced (using
+`.`) by other shell scripts to set up some variables pointing at
+the normal git directories and a few helper shell functions.
+
+Before sourcing it, your script should set up a few variables;
+`USAGE` (and `LONG_USAGE`, if any) is used to define message
+given by `usage()` shell function.  `SUBDIRECTORY_OK` can be set
+if the script can run from a subdirectory of the working tree
+(some commands do not).
+
+The scriptlet sets `GIT_DIR` and `GIT_OBJECT_DIRECTORY` shell
+variables, but does *not* export them to the environment.
+
+FUNCTIONS
+---------
+
+die::
+       exit after emitting the supplied error message to the
+       standard error stream.
+
+usage::
+       die with the usage message.
+
+set_reflog_action::
+       set the message that will be recorded to describe the
+       end-user action in the reflog, when the script updates a
+       ref.
+
+is_bare_repository::
+       outputs `true` or `false` to the standard output stream
+       to indicate if the repository is a bare repository
+       (i.e. without an associated working tree).
+
+cd_to_toplevel::
+       runs chdir to the toplevel of the working tree.
+
+require_work_tree::
+       checks if the repository is a bare repository, and dies
+       if so.  Used by scripts that require working tree
+       (e.g. `checkout`).
+
 
 Author
 ------
index cc4266d..228b9f1 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-shell(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-shell - Restricted login shell for GIT over SSH only
+git-shell - Restricted login shell for GIT-only SSH access
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index 95fa901..b0df92e 100644 (file)
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ OPTIONS
        of author alphabetic order.
 
 -s::
-       Supress commit description and provide a commit count summary only.
+       Suppress commit description and provide a commit count summary only.
 
 FILES
 -----
index 912e15b..ba5313d 100644 (file)
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ SYNOPSIS
 'git-show-branch' [--all] [--remotes] [--topo-order] [--current]
                [--more=<n> | --list | --independent | --merge-base]
                [--no-name | --sha1-name] [--topics] [<rev> | <glob>]...
-'git-show-branch' --reflog[=<n>] <ref>
+'git-show-branch' (-g|--reflog)[=<n>[,<base>]] [--list] [<ref>]
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
@@ -97,9 +97,13 @@ OPTIONS
        will show the revisions given by "git rev-list {caret}master
        topic1 topic2"
 
---reflog[=<n>] <ref>::
-       Shows <n> most recent ref-log entries for the given ref.
-
+--reflog[=<n>[,<base>]] [<ref>]::
+       Shows <n> most recent ref-log entries for the given
+       ref.  If <base> is given, <n> entries going back from
+       that entry.  <base> can be specified as count or date.
+       `-g` can be used as a short-hand for this option.  When
+       no explicit <ref> parameter is given, it defaults to the
+       current branch (or `HEAD` if it is detached).
 
 Note that --more, --list, --independent and --merge-base options
 are mutually exclusive.
@@ -165,6 +169,13 @@ With this, `git show-branch` without extra parameters would show
 only the primary branches.  In addition, if you happen to be on
 your topic branch, it is shown as well.
 
+------------
+$ git show-branch --reflog='10,1 hour ago' --list master
+------------
+
+shows 10 reflog entries going back from the tip as of 1 hour ago.
+Without `--list`, the output also shows how these tips are
+topologically related with each other.
 
 
 Author
index c210b9a..f56f164 100644 (file)
@@ -25,6 +25,9 @@ with \--name-only).
 
 For plain blobs, it shows the plain contents.
 
+The command takes options applicable to the gitlink:git-diff-tree[1] command to
+control how the changes the commit introduces are shown.
+
 This manual page describes only the most frequently used options.
 
 
@@ -32,6 +35,8 @@ OPTIONS
 -------
 <object>::
        The name of the object to show.
+       For a more complete list of ways to spell object names, see
+       "SPECIFYING REVISIONS" section in gitlink:git-rev-parse[1].
 
 include::pretty-formats.txt[]
 
index b7116b3..192b1f1 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-ssh-fetch(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-ssh-fetch - Pulls from a remote repository over ssh connection
+git-ssh-fetch - Fetch from a remote repository over ssh connection
 
 
 
index 702674e..a9b7e9f 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-ssh-upload(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-ssh-upload - Pushes to a remote repository over ssh connection
+git-ssh-upload - Push to a remote repository over ssh connection
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
index ce7857e..03871e5 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-status(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-status - Show working tree status
+git-status - Show the working tree status
 
 
 SYNOPSIS
@@ -34,6 +34,15 @@ The output from this command is designed to be used as a commit
 template comments, and all the output lines are prefixed with '#'.
 
 
+CONFIGURATION
+-------------
+
+The command honors `color.status` (or `status.color` -- they
+mean the same thing and the latter is kept for backward
+compatibility) and `color.status.<slot>` configuration variables
+to colorize its output.
+
+
 Author
 ------
 Written by Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org> and
index 1b01313..6ce6a39 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ git-svn(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-svn - bidirectional operation between Subversion and git
+git-svn - Bidirectional operation between a single Subversion branch and git
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
@@ -113,7 +113,7 @@ manually joining branches on commit.
 
 'commit-diff'::
        Commits the diff of two tree-ish arguments from the
-       command-line.  This command is intended for interopability with
+       command-line.  This command is intended for interoperability with
        git-svnimport and does not rely on being inside an git-svn
        init-ed repository.  This command takes three arguments, (a) the
        original tree to diff against, (b) the new tree result, (c) the
@@ -133,7 +133,7 @@ manually joining branches on commit.
 
 'multi-init'::
        This command supports git-svnimport-like command-line syntax for
-       importing repositories that are layed out as recommended by the
+       importing repositories that are laid out as recommended by the
        SVN folks.  This is a bit more tolerant than the git-svnimport
        command-line syntax and doesn't require the user to figure out
        where the repository URL ends and where the repository path
@@ -171,7 +171,7 @@ OPTIONS
 --shared::
 --template=<template_directory>::
        Only used with the 'init' command.
-       These are passed directly to gitlink:git-init-db[1].
+       These are passed directly to gitlink:git-init[1].
 
 -r <ARG>::
 --revision <ARG>::
@@ -204,7 +204,7 @@ removed by default if there are no files left in them.  git
 cannot version empty directories.  Enabling this flag will make
 the commit to SVN act like git.
 
-repo-config key: svn.rmdir
+config key: svn.rmdir
 
 -e::
 --edit::
@@ -215,7 +215,7 @@ Edit the commit message before committing to SVN.  This is off by
 default for objects that are commits, and forced on when committing
 tree objects.
 
-repo-config key: svn.edit
+config key: svn.edit
 
 -l<num>::
 --find-copies-harder::
@@ -226,8 +226,8 @@ They are both passed directly to git-diff-tree see
 gitlink:git-diff-tree[1] for more information.
 
 [verse]
-repo-config key: svn.l
-repo-config key: svn.findcopiesharder
+config key: svn.l
+config key: svn.findcopiesharder
 
 -A<filename>::
 --authors-file=<filename>::
@@ -245,7 +245,7 @@ will abort operation. The user will then have to add the
 appropriate entry.  Re-running the previous git-svn command
 after the authors-file is modified should continue operation.
 
-repo-config key: svn.authorsfile
+config key: svn.authorsfile
 
 -q::
 --quiet::
@@ -262,8 +262,8 @@ repo-config key: svn.authorsfile
 
        --repack-flags are passed directly to gitlink:git-repack[1].
 
-repo-config key: svn.repack
-repo-config key: svn.repackflags
+config key: svn.repack
+config key: svn.repackflags
 
 -m::
 --merge::
@@ -304,7 +304,7 @@ used to track branches across multiple SVN _repositories_.
 This option may be specified multiple times, once for each
 branch.
 
-repo-config key: svn.branch
+config key: svn.branch
 
 -i<GIT_SVN_ID>::
 --id <GIT_SVN_ID>::
@@ -320,7 +320,7 @@ for more information on using GIT_SVN_ID.
        started tracking a branch and never tracked the trunk it was
        descended from.
 
-repo-config key: svn.followparent
+config key: svn.followparent
 
 --no-metadata::
        This gets rid of the git-svn-id: lines at the end of every commit.
@@ -332,7 +332,7 @@ repo-config key: svn.followparent
        The 'git-svn log' command will not work on repositories using this,
        either.
 
-repo-config key: svn.nometadata
+config key: svn.nometadata
 
 --
 
@@ -367,7 +367,7 @@ Basic Examples
 Tracking and contributing to a the trunk of a Subversion-managed project:
 
 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Initialize a repo (like git init-db):
+# Initialize a repo (like git init):
        git-svn init http://svn.foo.org/project/trunk
 # Fetch remote revisions:
        git-svn fetch
@@ -388,7 +388,7 @@ See also:
 '<<tracking-multiple-repos,Tracking Multiple Repositories or Branches>>'
 
 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# Initialize a repo (like git init-db):
+# Initialize a repo (like git init):
        git-svn multi-init http://svn.foo.org/project \
                -T trunk -b branches -t tags
 # Fetch remote revisions:
index 4bc35a1..a88f722 100644 (file)
@@ -3,11 +3,11 @@ git-symbolic-ref(1)
 
 NAME
 ----
-git-symbolic-ref - read and modify symbolic refs
+git-symbolic-ref - Read and modify symbolic refs
 
 SYNOPSIS
 --------
-'git-symbolic-ref' <name> [<ref>]
+'git-symbolic-ref' [-q] [-m <reason>] <name> [<ref>]
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
@@ -23,6 +23,18 @@ A symbolic ref is a regular file that stores a string that
 begins with `ref: refs/`.  For example, your `.git/HEAD` is
 a regular file whose contents is `ref: refs/heads/master`.
 
+OPTIONS
+-------
+
+-q::
+       Do not issue an error message if the <name> is not a
+       symbolic ref but a detached HEAD; instead exit with
+       non-zero status silently.
+
+-m::
+       Update the reflog for <name> with <reason>.  This is valid only
+       when creating or updating a symbolic ref.
+
 NOTES
 -----
 In the past, `.git/HEAD` was a symbolic link pointing at
@@ -36,6 +48,10 @@ cumbersome.  On some platforms, `ln -sf` does not even work as
 advertised (horrors).  Therefore symbolic links are now deprecated
 and symbolic refs are used by default.
 
+git-symbolic-ref will exit with status 0 if the contents of the
+symbolic ref were printed correctly, with status 1 if the requested
+name is not a symbolic ref, or 128 if another error occurs.
+
 Author
 ------
 Written by Junio C Hamano <junkio@cox.net>