contrib/subtree: ensure only one rev is provided
[git/git.git] / Documentation / config / fsck.txt
1 fsck.<msg-id>::
2 During fsck git may find issues with legacy data which
3 wouldn't be generated by current versions of git, and which
4 wouldn't be sent over the wire if `transfer.fsckObjects` was
5 set. This feature is intended to support working with legacy
6 repositories containing such data.
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8 Setting `fsck.<msg-id>` will be picked up by linkgit:git-fsck[1], but
9 to accept pushes of such data set `receive.fsck.<msg-id>` instead, or
10 to clone or fetch it set `fetch.fsck.<msg-id>`.
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12 The rest of the documentation discusses `fsck.*` for brevity, but the
13 same applies for the corresponding `receive.fsck.*` and
14 `fetch.<msg-id>.*`. variables.
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16 Unlike variables like `color.ui` and `core.editor` the
17 `receive.fsck.<msg-id>` and `fetch.fsck.<msg-id>` variables will not
18 fall back on the `fsck.<msg-id>` configuration if they aren't set. To
19 uniformly configure the same fsck settings in different circumstances
20 all three of them they must all set to the same values.
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22 When `fsck.<msg-id>` is set, errors can be switched to warnings and
23 vice versa by configuring the `fsck.<msg-id>` setting where the
24 `<msg-id>` is the fsck message ID and the value is one of `error`,
25 `warn` or `ignore`. For convenience, fsck prefixes the error/warning
26 with the message ID, e.g. "missingEmail: invalid author/committer line
27 - missing email" means that setting `fsck.missingEmail = ignore` will
28 hide that issue.
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30 In general, it is better to enumerate existing objects with problems
31 with `fsck.skipList`, instead of listing the kind of breakages these
32 problematic objects share to be ignored, as doing the latter will
33 allow new instances of the same breakages go unnoticed.
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35 Setting an unknown `fsck.<msg-id>` value will cause fsck to die, but
36 doing the same for `receive.fsck.<msg-id>` and `fetch.fsck.<msg-id>`
37 will only cause git to warn.
38
39 fsck.skipList::
40 The path to a list of object names (i.e. one unabbreviated SHA-1 per
41 line) that are known to be broken in a non-fatal way and should
42 be ignored. On versions of Git 2.20 and later comments ('#'), empty
43 lines, and any leading and trailing whitespace is ignored. Everything
44 but a SHA-1 per line will error out on older versions.
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46 This feature is useful when an established project should be accepted
47 despite early commits containing errors that can be safely ignored
48 such as invalid committer email addresses. Note: corrupt objects
49 cannot be skipped with this setting.
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51 Like `fsck.<msg-id>` this variable has corresponding
52 `receive.fsck.skipList` and `fetch.fsck.skipList` variants.
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54 Unlike variables like `color.ui` and `core.editor` the
55 `receive.fsck.skipList` and `fetch.fsck.skipList` variables will not
56 fall back on the `fsck.skipList` configuration if they aren't set. To
57 uniformly configure the same fsck settings in different circumstances
58 all three of them they must all set to the same values.
59 +
60 Older versions of Git (before 2.20) documented that the object names
61 list should be sorted. This was never a requirement, the object names
62 could appear in any order, but when reading the list we tracked whether
63 the list was sorted for the purposes of an internal binary search
64 implementation, which could save itself some work with an already sorted
65 list. Unless you had a humongous list there was no reason to go out of
66 your way to pre-sort the list. After Git version 2.20 a hash implementation
67 is used instead, so there's now no reason to pre-sort the list.