5775cd28acfb391e585e6ec401ae2e21170ff46a
[git/git.git] / Documentation / everyday.txt
1 Everyday GIT With 20 Commands Or So
2 ===================================
3
4 GIT suite has over 100 commands, and the manual page for each of
5 them discusses what the command does and how it is used in
6 detail, but until you know what command should be used in order
7 to achieve what you want to do, you cannot tell which manual
8 page to look at, and if you know that already you do not need
9 the manual.
10
11 Does that mean you need to know all of them before you can use
12 git? Not at all. Depending on the role you play, the set of
13 commands you need to know is slightly different, but in any case
14 what you need to learn is far smaller than the full set of
15 commands to carry out your day-to-day work. This document is to
16 serve as a cheat-sheet and a set of pointers for people playing
17 various roles.
18
19 <<Basic Repository>> commands are needed by people who has a
20 repository --- that is everybody, because every working tree of
21 git is a repository.
22
23 In addition, <<Individual Developer (Standalone)>> commands are
24 essential for anybody who makes a commit, even for somebody who
25 works alone.
26
27 If you work with other people, you will need commands listed in
28 <<Individual Developer (Participant)>> section as well.
29
30 People who play <<Integrator>> role need to learn some more
31 commands in addition to the above.
32
33 <<Repository Administration>> commands are for system
34 administrators who are responsible to care and feed git
35 repositories to support developers.
36
37
38 Basic Repository[[Basic Repository]]
39 ------------------------------------
40
41 Everybody uses these commands to feed and care git repositories.
42
43 * gitlink:git-init-db[1] or gitlink:git-clone[1] to create a
44 new repository.
45
46 * gitlink:git-fsck-objects[1] to validate the repository.
47
48 * gitlink:git-prune[1] to garbage collect crufts in the
49 repository.
50
51 * gitlink:git-repack[1] to pack loose objects for efficiency.
52
53 Individual Developer (Standalone)[[Individual Developer (Standalone)]]
54 ----------------------------------------------------------------------
55
56 A standalone individual developer does not exchange patches with
57 other poeple, and works alone in a single repository, using the
58 following commands.
59
60 * gitlink:git-show-branch[1] to see where you are.
61
62 * gitlink:git-diff[1] and gitlink:git-status[1] to see what
63 you are in the middle of doing.
64
65 * gitlink:git-log[1] to see what happened.
66
67 * gitlink:git-whatchanged[1] to find out where things have
68 come from.
69
70 * gitlink:git-checkout[1] and gitlink:git-branch[1] to switch
71 branches.
72
73 * gitlink:git-update-index[1] to manage the index file.
74
75 * gitlink:git-commit[1] to advance the current branch.
76
77 * gitlink:git-reset[1] and gitlink:git-checkout[1] (with
78 pathname parameters) to undo changes.
79
80 * gitlink:git-pull[1] with "." as the remote to merge between
81 local branches.
82
83 * gitlink:git-rebase[1] to maintain topic branches.
84
85
86 Individual Developer (Participant)[[Individual Developer (Participant)]]
87 ------------------------------------------------------------------------
88
89 A developer working as a participant in a group project needs to
90 learn how to communicate with others, and uses these commands in
91 addition to the ones needed by a standalone developer.
92
93 * gitlink:git-pull[1] from "origin" to keep up-to-date with
94 the upstream.
95
96 * gitlink:git-push[1] to shared repository if you adopt CVS
97 style shared repository workflow.
98
99 * gitlink:git-format-patch[1] to prepare e-mail submission, if
100 you adopt Linux kernel-style public forum workflow.
101
102
103 Integrator[[Integrator]]
104 ------------------------
105
106 A fairly central person acting as the integrator in a group
107 project receives changes made by others, reviews and integrates
108 them and publishes the result for others to use, using these
109 commands in addition to the ones needed by participants.
110
111 * gitlink:git-am[1] to apply patches e-mailed in from your
112 contributors.
113
114 * gitlink:git-pull[1] to merge from your trusted lieutenants.
115
116 * gitlink:git-format-patch[1] to prepare and send suggested
117 alternative to contributors.
118
119 * gitlink:git-revert[1] to undo botched commits.
120
121 * gitlink:git-push[1] to publish the bleeding edge.
122
123
124 Repository Administration[[Repository Administration]]
125 ------------------------------------------------------
126
127 A repository administrator uses the following tools to set up
128 and maintain access to the repository by developers.
129
130 * gitlink:git-daemon[1] to allow anonymous download from
131 repository.
132
133 * gitlink:git-shell[1] can be used as a 'restricted login shell'
134 for shared central repository users.
135
136 * link:howto/update-hook-example.txt[update hook howto] has a
137 good example of managing a shared central repository.
138